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Questions and Answers

2017

  • Question
    Hello again, I sent 1 photo a few days ago. I just found the second one. I am hoping it will help with ID. It was on a swamp edge. Thank you! Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, you have photographed a species of Poa (bluegrass). It looks like Poa pratensis (Kentucky bluegrass). If you were to take the spikelets apart, you would identify cobwebby hairs attached the bases of the florets. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Euphrasia on an island near Grand Manan, New Brunswick. The bracts are ascending, but the teeth are not. Is this Euphrasia nemorosa, based on bract teeth not ascending, although the bracts themselves are ascending? I did not collect the plant, and do not know if the bract bases are cuneate or rounded.
    Answer
    Dear Thokozile, from what I can observe, this plant is most likely Euphrasia nemorosa. It is usually best to observe populations rather than individuals because the growth form is affected by microsite differences. The leaf blades appear relatively broad-based and the flowers are large (E. nemorosa has slightly larger flowers than E. stricta). While I can't be confident from one plant, it is what is suggested by the morphology to me.
  • Question
    Hello and happy holidays! Is this Glycerin acutiflora - Sharp-scaled Manna Grass? Thank you, Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, it could be. From what I can see in the image, the spikelets are of the appropriate morphology for this species. I can also observe what appears to be Hottonia inflata in the background (nice find).
  • Question
    May I know the name of this plant, please?
    Answer
    Dear Ali-Fatahalla, good morning. Please understand that without location information I am unable to help you. There are nearly 500,000 species of plants in the world, and location helps to narrow this down to one or two thousand possibilities (or even less if specific location details are offered). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern United States). If you need help with the plant of your area, I can help you find a resource. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please identify
    Answer
    Dear Prathamesh3301, good morning. Please understand that without location information I am unable to help you. There are nearly 500,000 species of plants in the world, and location helps to narrow this down to one or two thousand possibilities (or even less if specific location details are offered). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern United States). If you need help with the plant of your area, I can help you find a resource. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I need help ID'ing this Willow please! I've been working on this one a long time. How delighted I am to have found you! Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, you have photographed a willow (genus Salix). But without location information, I can't assist you. What is wonderful is that you've provided a number of images (very helpful), but I don't know where in the world this image was taken. It is a species similar to Salix cinerea or Salix humilis, but I can't tell you which one without more information. To best help you, I need photographs, location, and habitat. I'm sorry I couldn't be of more help.
  • Question
    I would appreciate your help with identification of this grass. You can readily see pretty purple seed pods if you enlarge the photo. Much thanks, Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, unfortunately, I'm simply not able to see the diagnostic structures in your photographs. I need some closer images (in addition to one you've provided) to be able to identify this grass. If you have other images, please supply them.
  • Question
    Hello, Thank you for your time. I have figured out not to ask for help with trees! Is this plant Atriplex acadiensiss - Maritime Orache? Found on the beach. Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, good afternoon. You do have a species of Atriplex (orache), but I cannot tell you which species because the diagnostic characters are not present in your photograph. I would need to see the lower leaves (their outline and orientation of basal lobes) to assist. I think in the future you should, when possible, take several photographs of the plant, being sure to capture different parts, to allow a confident identification. I'm sorry I can't assist you with the uploaded image.
  • Question
    Hello, I live in SE Michigan and these two types of horse tail have invaded my yard. The more I try to eradicate the more they spread. Please help me. They have encroached my vegetable garden so I would rather not use harsh chemicals. The bamboo looking one are only in the ditch so far so they are not as troublesome. The feathery ones spread faster and they are all over.
    Answer
    Dear nwhite, you have two different species Equisetum (horsetail, scouring-rush). Unfortunately, the images you have posted are too small for me to determine what species they are. If you have larger images, I would be able to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi- I found this plant (heavily browsed) growing on a hilltop in Mohawk Trail State Forest in Mass. Flowers were around 3/4" inch in diameter and the plants were around a foot tall, although height may be due to browsing. Please id if possible, thanks!
    Answer
    Dear aletamck, good morning. You have collected either Aureolaria pedicularia (fern-leaved false foxglove) or Aureolaria virginica (downy false foxglove), native plants of New England. I cannot see close enough to the petals or sepals to see the distinguishing characteristics that would allow me to separate these for you (sorry). If you have other images, post them and I can try to help you further.
  • Question
    Is this a plant detritus that was observed under a microscope?
    Answer
    Dear danpaulo_v, good morning. I would love to be able to assist you, but I can't help you with your question. It certainly looks like some type of plant material, but from that fragment, I can't identify it. Sorry.
  • Question
    This was growing in the yard. I have no idea what it is. It has thorns on the stem and on it leaves. Located in Cottage Grove, Oregon.
    Answer
    Dear littlepieceofheaven, good morning. I can't identify your plant with confidence because I do not have deep familiarity with plants on the western side of the continent (Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England). That written, the plants looks like a species of Solanum (nighthade). There are several species with prickles on the stems and leaves as you have photographed. I would start there with your search for a name.
  • Question
    Hello! I was wondering if you could identify this plant? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear andrewlankes, good morning. I would like to assist you, but without knowing where in the world this photograph was taken I unable to. Location is a very important part of the identification process. With nearly 500,000 species of plants, knowledge of the region the plant was growing eliminates many of the possible choices. If you can share the location, I may be able to assist or find someone who can. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello there, After looking at all the true grasses in Massachusetts I've come up with an unlikely match. this grass was found at the edge of a swamp. I am hoping you can help! I have matched my photo with Poa secunda - Curley Blue Grass. What do you think? Thank you for your help! Susan L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, good morning. You have photographed (likely) a species of Poa (blue grass). It looks much like Poa pratensis (Kentucky blue grass). If you were to pull apart the spikelets, you would notice cobwebby hairs at the bases of the individual scales.
  • Question
    Hello again, Is this an Annual or Perennial Rye Grass on the left? Thank you very much! Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, Your grass appears to be Elymus repens (creeping wild-rye). The flat side of the spikelets are against the rachis of the inflorescence and there are two glumes. If this was a species of Lolium (rye grass), it would have the edge set against the axis of the inflorescence and there would only be one glume per spikelet. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    The last two pictures of ferns on the Simple Key page have invaded my yard and nothing I do has helped. I even tried to burn out the last picture. I have been told they are both called horse tail. The feathery ones in the first picture have now spread to my strawberry patch. Please help me eradicate them, preferably without chemicals. I live in SE Michigan. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear nwhite, I'm sorry but there are no pictures associated with your question. Without images I won't be able to assist. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Could you please identify the plant? I bought it from a nursery and they could not name it. All it says is "Home foliage" Would like to know what kind of a plant this is and type of care needed. Thanks, SK
    Answer
    Dear SK, hello and good morning. I'm sorry I cannot assist with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. There are too many cultivated species coming from all over the world for me to be abreast of them all. I wish I was able to assist.
  • Question
    Hello! new here! I have a Norwegian Red cone spruce that I have put into a bonsai pot late fall/early winter here in Montana, though it has been indoors to prevent temperature shock (It was shipped to me from California) I recently noticed a very dark brown color creeping through the needles from the tips of most of the branches and wanted to see if you thought it was repotting shock... or something more worrisome. Thanks for your time!
    Answer
    Dear Zero, good morning. I'm sorry that I cannot help you. I am not versed in plant pathology. You might want to contact the horticulture department at the New England Wild Flower Society or another organization to find someone who might recognize the symptoms your plant is displaying. Good luck.
  • Question
    Identity of this plant
    Answer
    Dear Evilb71, the plant you have photographed is Portulaca oleracea (common purslane), a common, succulent plant of open and/or disturbed habitats that is really frequent in garden and planted settings.
  • Question
    Hi I have this plant infesting my lawn can you advise what it is and how to eliminate it please
    Answer
    Dear villagirl, good morning. Because I don't know where this plant was growing, I won't be able to give you a confident answer on its identification. What I can tell you is that it is a species of Cyperus (flatsedge), a member of the Cyperaceae (sedge family). There are native and non-native species, depending on where you live. I have this is helpful.
  • Question
    What type of plants have a naturally high nitrogen/phosphorus nutrient intake? Plants that absorb nitrogen and phosphorus rapidly, either in the form of ammonia, phosphates, etc. I'm looking for plant species capable of rapidly absorbing nutrients for a research project. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Twopiaresquared, good morning. This particular question I can't answer satisfactorily. While it is known that many legume plants (species in the Fabaceae) are high in protein (and thus must take up nitrogen because this element is a building block of amino acids), I'm not sure if this actually gets to the question you are asking. This is a physiological question and is outside of the realm of expertise being shared on the Go Botany website. I'm sorry I can't give you more information.
  • Question
    Hi I am doing a project in my Environmental Science class on creating a Wetland Field Guide. This is one of many plants I am having trouble identifying. I found it in Danvers, Massachusetts. We took photographs of these plants around a month ago if not a couple weeks ago. I would greatly appreciate it if this plant could be identified, along with if any botanist could help me identify more of them for this project due soon. All of my plants were found near or at a wetland. Sincerely, Dustin
    Answer
    Dustin, good morning. Your plant is Smilax rotundifolia (common greenbrier), a native, armed liana in the Greenbier Family. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in northeast Nebraska on a prairie
    Answer
    Dear Shellbi, sorry, I can't help with this one. I'm not familiar with the flora of Nebraska. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in northeast Nebraska on a prairie
    Answer
    Dear Shellbi, your plant may be Erigeron canadensis (Canada fleabane; synonym: Conyza Canadensis). I'm not confident because of my lack of familiarity with the Nebraska flora, but I suggest you check there to see if this fits well. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in northeast Nebraska on a prairie
    Answer
    Dear Shellbi, sorry, I can't help with this one. I'm not familiar with the flora of Nebraska. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in northeast Nebraska on a prairie
    Answer
    Dear Shellbi, your plant appears to be Ambrosia trifida (giant ragweed), a member of the Asteraceae. The staminate flowers have all fallen off the upper parts of the capitulescence.
  • Question
    Found in northeast Nebraska on a prairie
    Answer
    Dear Shellbi, sorry, I can't help with this one. I'm not familiar with the flora of Nebraska. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in northeast Nebraska on a prairie
    Answer
    Dear She11bi, Good morning. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. As such, Nebraska is a long way away from my area of expertise. That written, this looks like a species of Croton (also the common name is Croton) in the Euphorbiaceae. Hopefully that suggestion will get you started identifying this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Putnam County NY wooded area. Plant is about 5 foot tall. Leaves still green in late November. Note white fruit. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Roxi, your plant looks like Viburnum lantata (wayfaring tree). This is a native of Europe that is planted in the northeast and occasionally escapes the cultivated setting. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am looking for seed of different Suaeda spp. Where can I get them?
    Answer
    Dear farag100, good morning. I'm not sure where you could purchase seeds of Suaeda species. Go Botany is a website for identifying wild plants of New England. You might consider contacting the nursery staff at the New England Wild Flower Society, who may be able to direct you to a source. There email addresses can be found here: http://www.newenglandwild.org/contact .
  • Question
    Please help me identify these two ferns. Photos were taken in Litchfield County, CT in October, 2017.
    Answer
    Dear Donald, I would like to help you more than I can, but both photographs are not sufficient to confidently identify the fern in each. If you are able to, in the future, please take multiple images of each species, one closer, and one viewing the underside of the leaf. The green fern is a species of the genus Dryopteris (wood fern), but I can't tell you for certain which one. The brown fern appears to be a member of the Osmundaceae (royal fern family), but could either be Osmundastrum cinnamomeum (cinnamon fern) or Osmunda claytoniana (interrupted fern). I hope these answers are at least of some help.
  • Question
    Hello, I have this amazing houseplant on my porch and cant seem to find it ANYWHERE! I have even asked several staff members at local nurseries and nothing! Only answer I heard that comes a little close is that its related to an elk or staghorn fern. Help! :-) Should I be growing it in something else? Thanks,
    Answer
    Dear picki15, good morning. I'm sorry that I cannot help you with your question. Go Botany is a site dedicated to wild plants of New England. Cultivated species are another topic altogether, originating from all over the world. I wish I could assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm interested in developing some "living pathways" through my small garden. I've been reading about "stepable" plants, such as creeping thyme and roman chamomile, and am inspired by the work of Lionel Smith on grass-free lawns in the U.K. (http://www.grassfreelawns.co.uk/). Do you know of any resources (people I could talk to, or online) that might steer me towards some lists of native creeping (clonal) forbes that might be suitable for such a project? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear kekawaka, good morning. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. You might want to direct any questions regarding cultivation and horticulture to other departments at the New England Wild Flower Society. Here is a link to their contact page to find the appropriate person to answer your question: http://www.newenglandwild.org/contact
  • Question
    What is this? 15' shrub (tree?) in woodland, 35 Baptist Rd, Canterbury NH. Don't know if this is full grown. No larger specimen in the immediate area. No evidence of berries or spent flowers. TINY clusters of white buds(?) found on some stems. Hard to determine if one main trunk as many trunks are growing among maples, oaks, etc. Have lived in New England 81 years and don't remember ever seeing this plant. Leaves are similar to azalea or holly in texture.
    Answer
    Dear MaryB, good morning. I don't know what species of plant you have photographed. It may be a member of the genus Cotoneaster (also referred to as cotoneaster for its common name), a member of the rose family. There are many species in this genus, and they would require flowers and/or fruits to identify the plants. Perhaps we can keep watch of this plant and find the flowers on it earlier in the season. Thanks for posting.
  • Question
    I recently collected some seeds and decided to plant them, I just need help identifying what kind of herb has sprout!
    Answer
    Dear dderks1, I'm sorry I can't help you. I would need more information to possibly assist. Location is very important information for plant identification. I don't know the region these seeds were collected from. I would also need to know if they were cultivated or wild plants. I wish I could do more for you at this time.
  • Question
    I know the family is Chenopodiaceae, but what is the genus and species of this plant?
    Answer
    Dear Bobcatchick25, your plant appears to be Cycloloma atriplicifolium (winged-pigweed), a member of the Amaranthaceae (amaranth family). It is a plant that colonizes disturbed soils (e.g., roadsides, waste areas, agricultural fields). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have this sago palm that has bloomed this weird-looking Bloom this year. It's approximately 15 years old. I was wondering if you knew what it was? I live in the San Joaquin Valley in California.
    Answer
    Dear elrodbaer, good morning. There is no image associated with your question. without an image, I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email. My address is ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, feel free to use it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I live in Los Angeles area and my question is about Japanese hedges that I have grown for past 20 years. Since last year, some plants stopped branching off. Stems got naked and eventually whole plant died and i ended up replacing several of them. I dug up around the roots and no abnormal signs that I could see. Attached pictures show this condition happening on another side opposite to where I lost several plants. Anything I can do save them please? Thank you in advance!
    Answer
    Dear Kim596, I wish so much I could help you. I'm sorry that I can't. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Horticulture isn't the topic area of this particular website. You might want to contact the horticulture department (you can find contact information here: http://www.newenglandwild.org/contac) and direct this question to them. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have come upon some discrepancies regarding the naming and identification of Wild Lettuce. In Wikipedia, it is referred to as Lactuca virosa and distinguished from Prickly Lettuce (Lactuca serriola). Your description of the pharmacological effects of L. serriola seem to match those of L. virosa. Your description of L. sativa would seem to match more closely what Wikipedia is referring to as L. virosa. Can you clear this up, especially given the interest in this plant for pharmacology?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, Lactuca virosa is not part of the New England flora. It has been introduced to North America only in the western part of the continent. Lactuca sativa is the cultivated lettuce that has lost most its pharmacological potency--the bitter terpenes bred out of this species to make it more palatable. Lactuca serriola, the wild progenitor of L. sativa, still has the bitter terpenes that are used medicinally. If you have more questions, feel free to ask away.
  • Question
    Hi found this plant growing don’t recall growing it in my conservatory green house in hull East Yorkshire can u email me as need to know what the green balls are that are there after petals fell off tia
    Answer
    Dear Paula, I can't identify your plant beyond the genus (Solanum--nightshade). This is a member of the tomato family and the "green balls" are the immature fruits. Depending on what group in the genus this belongs to, they may black, yellow, or some other color at maturity.
  • Question
    I’ve got this plant but I don’t know it’s name. I need to know so i can take good care of the plant.
    Answer
    Dear Nonnatamer, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help you with this question. I do not recognize this cultivated species. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Many cultivated species originate in distant lands and may not be familiar to me. Again, sorry I cannot assist this time with your question.
  • Question
    Found near Newton by the Skating rink. This plant with yellow flowers is small.
    Answer
    Dear whtien, I can't see the leaves well enough in the image to tell for certain, but this plant may be Hieracium saboudum (Savoy hawkweed). It is a non-native composite that is found in disturbed areas.
  • Question
    Found in Cambridge, MA flowered in September.
    Answer
    Dear whtien, the plant in your images is a species of Bidens (beggar-ticks). It is either Bidens frondosa (Devil's beggar-ticks) or Bidens vulgata (tall beggar-ticks). I would need to see a close-up of the flower heads to help you know for sure which one it is.
  • Question
    Found in Lincoln, MA. Very small soft pink/purple flowers.
    Answer
    Dear whtien, you've photographed Lobelia inflata (bladder-pod lobelia), a species also known as "Indian-tobacco". It is a native member of the Campanulaceae, usually found in openings.
  • Question
    Found by Charles River, Boston side
    Answer
    Dear whtien, good morning. I can't identify your plant with confidence without seeing more images (and closer images of various parts). It may be Symphyotrichum pilosum (awl American-aster), but I can't be certain aside from the genus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in Cambridge
    Answer
    Dear whtien, there are two plants in the image. The one in the background appears to be Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed). The one in the foreground I can't identify because there is too little of the plant showing. Sorry I can't help further.
  • Question
    Found by Charles River, Boston side
    Answer
    Dear whtien, I'm sorry, but I can't see enough of this plant to be certain of its identification. It is a species of Symphyotrichum (American-aster), and may be Symphyotrichum dumosum (bushy American-aster) or something closely related. With additional images of the plant, including a close-up of the flower heads, I could likely give a more detailed answer.
  • Question
    Found in Cambridge, MA
    Answer
    Dear whtien, the flowering plant in the photograph is Tanacetum vulgare (common tansy), a non-native member of the composite family. If you crush a leaf, you will notice a strong fragrance.
  • Question
    Found in Cape Cod (Eastham)
    Answer
    Dear whtien, your plant is Saponaria officinalis (common soapwort), a non-native member of the Caryphyllaceae. It is introduced here and there in New England in fields, along roadsides, and other open areas.
  • Question
    Found by Charles River, Boston side. Mixed colorful (bubble gum colors) fruit in September.
    Answer
    Dear whtien, you have photographed a species of peppervine (genus Ampelopsis). It is most likely Ampelopsis glandulosa (Amur peppervine), a non-native liana of the grape family.
  • Question
    Found along Charles River. It does not seem to have flowers (I have been observing and looking for awhile).
    Answer
    Dear whtien, you've posted images of two different plants. The vegetative one is Lotus corniculatus (garden bird's-foot-trefoil), a non-native member of the legume family. The other is a member of the composite family, but I cannot identify it because there is not enough of the plant shown in the photograph. For identifications, it is nice to have multiple images of each plant showing leaves, flowers, stems, etc.
  • Question
    Found in Lincoln and in Cambridge. Flowered in early September.
    Answer
    Dear whtien, this plant is Lapsana communis (nipplewort), a non-native member of the Asteraceae (composite family). The lower leaves have a characteristic lobing that helps with the identification.
  • Question
    Found in Cambridge, MA. This plant has flower flowers earlier in the summer.
    Answer
    Dear whtien, this species is Hypericum perforatum (common St. John's-wort). This is a common, non-native weed of disturbed and open areas in the northeast.
  • Question
    Found in Porter Square, Cambridge. This grass is small.
    Answer
    Dear whiten, you've photographed a species of Cyperus (flatsedge), a member of the Cyperaceae (sedge family). I can't tell you which species you have without more photographs of the diagnostic traits (such as fruit, underground organs, etc.). You most likely have Cyperus lupulinus (Great Plains flatsedge), a native species of New England.
  • Question
    Found in Plymouth, MA, sandy soil. This plant has very small blue flowers.
    Answer
    Dear whiten, you've photographed Trichostema dichotomum (forked blue-curls), a native member of the mint family. This species has very characteristic arched stamens when in flower.
  • Question
    Found in Cambridge, MA
    Answer
    Dear whiten@gmail.com, your plant is likely Sonchus oleraceus (spiny-leaved sow-thistle). The image isn't from the best angle for me to be 100% sure because I can't see the shapes of the lobes on the larger leaves. However, it is likely this species, a member of the composite family.
  • Question
    Hi, I am trying to identify this shrub or tree with serrated dull green oval leaves. It is growing in sandy soil in Scarborough, Maine. Could it be ninebark? Thank you!!
    Answer
    Dear Fpolygala, there is no image associated with your question. Without this, I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email. Send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    This plant (weed?) came up a few days ago, and I have no idea what it is. I have gone through hours of searching on botany websites, but cannot find it. Can you please help with identification? It is in Massachusetts, on my front lawn on the edge of our foundation plantings.
    Answer
    Dear Jeanachang, I'm not 100% certain of the species you have, but they do look much like the basal leaves of Leonurus cardiaca (motherwort), a member of the mint family. The lower leaves of this species are usually with deeper sinuses and more pointed lobes, but some features here fit well for that species. You could try studying that lead and see if you agree. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello there, I would like to confirm or not... Is this Common Boneset - Eupatorium perfoliatum? In my research I noted that the leaves are uniformly triangular. These leaves aren't. What do you think. Thank you so much. I am very glad to have found you!
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, good morning. I'm not sure where you are located, so my answer cannot be confident (location information is vital for plant identification). This looks like Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium (blunt-leaved rabbit-tobacco). It is a species with alternate leaves that are not fused to a leaf on the opposite side of the node (Eupatorium perfoliatum has opposite leaves that are fused to each other at the common node). Note also the coating gray, woolly hairs on the stems and underside of the leaves (not found in Eupatorium perfoliatum). I hope this helps.
  • Question
    I'm going to try again with more details with the mystery plant you answered on 6/11/17. Several plants were close together, but not in a tight clump. I couldn't find anything that seemed to be a match among the Solidagos. but it did look rather similar to Euthamia graminifolia, except the leaves on this plant had widely spaced teeth. Perhaps the details on the seeds will help.
    Answer
    Chaffeemonell, there is more than one species in the original image you submitted several days ago. The one with very dried up leaves covering most of the left half of the image (and included here) is likely not a Solidago, but rather a Symphyotrichum (American-aster). The flower heads (capitula) are too large and too few for most Solidago. The leaves could be Symphyotrichum lanceolatum subsp. lanceolatum var. lanceolatum (the narrow-leaved form of this species). I can't be confident, but that is what these images suggest (as they lack the triple-veined pattern found in some goldendrods). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm hoping there is enough detail in these pictures to identify which species of Goldenrod this is on the Grounds of Joppa Flats Education Center, Plum Island Turnpike, Newburyport, MA.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, unfortunately, there isn't the necessary details for me to help you. Some items I would need to know include (1) the presence/absence and kinds of hairs on the stem, (2) the growth habit (i.e., does if form colonies by rhizomes or is it clumped), and (3) some details of the leaves (such as vein patterns, etc.). Without these items, I won't be able to help with the goldenrod at this time of year. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this an albiflora specimen of Oldfield Toadflax. I have seen many many specimens purple Toadflax plants but never a white one! Found on the coast of Salem, Ma. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, you photograph certainly appears to be a white-flowered form of Nuttalanthus canadensis (oldfield-toadflax). Not something I observe very frequently. Thanks for sharing the observation.
  • Question
    Hi, these Vaccinium spp. were found in open forest in northwest Somerset county, ME (lower elevation, well drained). One blueberry plant is abundant, has light blue berries with a distinct bloom. the leaves are lighter green with finely serrated leaves. The buds are bright red (pic without the berry). The less common blueberry has a glossy dark blue fruit with darker green leaves and green/red buds.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, good morning. These are both the same species. Individual plants may or may not produce a bloom on the berries. It is usual for there to be a bloom, but sometimes it is absent. This form has been named in the past (var. nigrum), but is now realized to be a form not worthy of formal taxonomic recognition. In fact, within a given small colony, the fruits can vary as to whether or not a bloom is present.
  • Question
    It is used for stopping the bleeding,it is a creeper plant,normally found in bushes
    Answer
    Dear King, Your plant looks like Mikania scandens (climbing hempvine). However, without knowing where this plant was seen, I can't be confident in my answer. Location information (just general, such as the state or the portion of the state) is really crucial for confirming identifications and narrowing down the possible choices. Perhaps my suggestion of the species will allow you to use images on the web to confirm this species.
  • Question
    Hello! I thought this plant was a hibiscus but it turns out I am wrong. Are you able to identify it from this picture? Thank you
    Answer
    Dear dcher002, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help you much with this one. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I don't know where this particular plant is from and I don't know if it is wild (native or naturalized). From what I can see, it does look to be part of the Malvaceae (mallow family), which Hibiscus belongs, but without additional images (and larger ones), I can't help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! The beautiful red fall color of this plant caught my eye. It is growing in pine duff. Are you able to identify it from the image?
    Answer
    Fpolygala, it is likely you have photographed Viburnum angustifolium (lowbush blueberry). It has leaves sometimes of this outline, and frequently of this vibrant color. This hypothesis also fits well with the small winter buds found on the branchlets (I can hardly see them in the photograph). Best wishes.
  • Question
    It does not look like common winter berry that grows near wetlands. Is this smooth winterberry? Located in a woodland with standing water earlier in the year. Leaves are thin, almost papery, and smooth.
    Answer
    Dear nemerson, While your plant may be smooth winterberry (Ilex laevigata), I can't confirm this for you without a better view of the fruits. Specifically, I need to see the persistent sepals on the lower side of the fruit (to observe the presence or +/- absence of cilia). It is a good candidate for your hypothesis, but I can't confirm from the image supplied. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Does Betula lenta always have a wintergreen smell? We were identifying woody species in a forest with lots of B. lenta, but came across many smaller individuals(often with multiple stems of 1-2 cm DBH each) that have characters spot on for B. lenta, but without the smell. Could they be B. alleghaniensis? (Didn't see any large B. alleghaniensis.) The bark is too young to use that for information. I was also thinking that perhaps the smell is less prominent this late in the year? (Oct 18) Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Alden, both Betula lenta and Betula alleghaniensis produce methyl salicylate (the source of the wintergreen odor). However, I have encountered individuals before with little or no smell later in season (including the winter). While some individuals seems to have a strong smell, others nearby had very little. The plants you are seeing/smelling may well be Betula lenta if they still have the other morphological characteristics.
  • Question
    Hi, I asked about the two similar asters: one white, one lavender. Here are a couple more pictures. The lavender one has basal foliage, as you'll see, but the white one doesn't seem to have any. (It's surrounded by miscellaneous leaves of dandelions, etc. Wish the pictures were better.) Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Jbrine1, it is likely the one with purple ray flowers is Symphyotrichum cordifolium (heart-leaved American-aster) or a near relative. The individual with white ray flowers I still suggest as Symphyotrichum lanceolatum. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hey Guys, Is there a way to induce a plant to create flowers sooner than it natural would if left to grow on its own? For plants that just flower, and plants which flower to create fruit. Also, which nutrients and substances does the plant provide to the flower-fruit while it grows? And, this may sound strange, can these be replicated, like if a flower falls off can it be 'fed' these nutrients to get it to grow the fruit still when separated from the plant? Thanks, was curious. Scott
    Answer
    Dear Scott, one can certainly transplant mature plants to an area to bring flowers sooner than would occur, such as a site that has been disturbed and the vegetation removed. Keep in mind that all plants that flower do so to produce fruits (i.e., flowers mature into fruits, so flowering plants are also fruiting plants). I don't know if flowers can be kept alive for a considerable period after they fall--because they fall from the plant when their function has been completed (i.e., they may not be receptive to water and nutrients at this time). Feel free to let me know if you still have questions.
  • Question
    I photographed what I thought was a hawkweed flower, but have come a crossed a reference that identifies the flower as "fall dandelion." The basal leaves do not appear to be scalloped. It was growing in a crack of asphalt bordering a creek. Thank you in advance. CY
    Answer
    Dear califyank, I cannot identify your plant without knowing what part of the world it hails from. If you can let me know where the photograph was taken, I can try to help you further. I can be reached at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org.
  • Question
    I have pulled up small woody plants with blackish or bluish green leaves that planted themselves in pine duff. Are you able to identify the plant from the photographs?
    Answer
    The photograph on the other question was Solanum dulcamara (climbing nightshade).
  • Question
    Hi, I have found somewoody seedlings on my property with leaf color that is glaucous black green (see photos). Are you able to identify this from the photos? The habitat is a small open area of pine duff.
    Answer
    Dear Fpolygala, you have photographed Solanum dulcamara (climbing nightshade), a relatively common liana in New England. If you look closely, you should find some leaves having a small pair of basal lobes (characteristic of this species). The fruits, when the plant is mature, are bright red.
  • Question
    I've been running into a type of flowering shrub often found on the sides of streets and along the highway. It grows with dense tall shoots I estimate 8' tall that form a low canopy. I've noticed variations on the plant with it's leaf form, flower and also as low ground cover. Hopefully a trained eye will be able to clear this mystery for me.
    Answer
    Dear Paul, you appear to have photographed Reynoutria X bohemica (Bohemian knotweed), formerly referred to as Fallopia X bohemica. It is the hybrid between Reynoutria japonica (Japanese knotweed) and Reynoutria sachalinensis (giant knotweed). It is quite common around New England and is routinely misidentified as Reynoutria japonica. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    I'm trying to find the type of ivy this is. It grows all along walls on our campus at the University of Minnesota. It has red stems and blue berries that grow on it. The bigger leaves have about 3 points (I don't know what the points are called). Please help me identify the type of ivy this is.
    Answer
    Dear lyon304, your plant is Parthenocissus triscupidata (Bosty-ivy), a member of the grape family. It is frequently planted on campuses and within cities, where it climbs the side of the buildings by means of adhesive disks at the apex of the tendrils. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This popped up a few weeks ago. We've been told it's a hickory tree. We do have some shag bark hickories on the opposite side of our house. If it is a hickory, we are going to transplant it. Thanks for your help. It seems to be growing off a big tap root.
    Answer
    Lisabailey, yes, it does look like a species of Carya (hickory). Small plants, such as the one you have photographed, are difficult to confidently identify from images. It may well be shagbark hickory. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found this on the cliff side overlooking the Bay of Fundy at Cape Forchu...Yarmouth Co. Nova Scotia...Oct.4/17
    Answer
    Dear Ervin, you have photographed a species of Agalinis (agalinis), a native member of the Orobanchaceae. You likely have either Agalinis paupercula or A. neoscotica. I would not be able to assist further without careful measurements to distinguish these two species. Hopefully knowing it is one of those two species will allow you to finish the identification.
  • Question
    Helianthus along the bank of a small stream in WIlliston VT 9/19/17
    Answer
    Dear joshl, I can't be confident from the image supplied, but based on the petiole, leaf vein, and capitulum morphology, along with the habitat, this is likely Helianthus decapetalus (thin-leaved sunflower). It is a common native species of that habitat. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! Is branching on Lysimachia quadrifolia due to genetic variability? The typical Lysimachia quadrifolia form (same place, same day) is posted in the right.
    Answer
    Fpolygala, it looks like the stem apex was damaged (perhaps by animal browsing or wind damage). The lateral branches taking over the role of upward growth is very typical in this situation. Thanks for sharing.
  • Question
    I am sorry that I am not in the New England area but the Midwest. I just want to ask the Botanist what this structure is that my Magnolia tree has sprouted. In May this tree will flower white flowers, before the leaves. Then it may bloom a second time. This structure is red, and has a cover over it, like a bract. Then it exposes perhaps a pod. Are there seeds inside? Why do the seeds erupt without flowers?
    Answer
    Dear TcKoh, this structure (the entire thing) is the immature fruit (an aggregate of follicles). Each individual follicle does not develop synchronously with the others, so you get these odd, deformed looking fruits during the maturation phase. If you perform a web search using the search terms "magnolia soulangeana fruit" you'll find all kinds of these. Note, I'm not suggesting that is the identity of your Magnolia, only the images of this species shows the characteristic I'm trying to convey to you really well.
  • Question
    This sensitive fern on the left has an interesting spoked form. It's neighbor has a typical form. Might this be the result an environmental mutation?
    Answer
    Dear Fpolygala, It appears that the central axis of the leaf blade was damaged (I can see a point where the axis is broken/eaten). This form is typical when such damage has occurred to the growing axis. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hey I am having difficulty identifying this plant! It was found along the College of the Atlantic parking lot and road. The habitar was very disturbed and fairly dry, trees were cut in the area. It ranged from a few inches across to almost a foot in diameter. Was not flowering.
    Answer
    Dear Mriewest, there is no image associated with your question. Without an image I will not be able to help you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    This plant was found in between a parking lot and road near College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, ME. I have used the simple and full key and have had no luck. The area it was in was a cut forest that was fairly dry.
    Answer
    Dear Mriewest, you have photographed a species of Cirsium (thistle). These are the basal leaves of the plant (prior to sending up an aerial shoot that will flower). I can't tell you which species of thistle this is without stem leaves and flower heads. But hopefully knowing the genus will be useful.
  • Question
    Hi, This small tree is growing along side white pine, oak and maple. The tree is appox. 15' tall and the crown spread appox. 10' wide. Hope you can identify it. Thank You
    Answer
    alwayslooking, your plant may be Salix cinerea (gray willow). The ridges on the stems suggest this identification. But to confirm this, we would need to peel the bark on the two-year-old branches and identify if there are fine, elongate ridges on the wood. Salix cinerea is a non-native species that looks much like the native Salix humilis and Salix bebbiana. I hope this helps.
  • Question
    What do you suppose these two "asters" are? They're similar in size: one white, one lavender. The leaves are more narrow on the white one. The leaves on the lavender one are wider and denser. I found these in Pawling, NY, Dutchess County - just over the border from Sherman, Connecticut. They're growing in more or less open areas, almost side by side.
    Answer
    Dear Jbrine1, I can't confidently identify the members of the genus Symphyotrichum (American-aster) without the lower leaves. The one on the left (white ray flowers) appears to be Symphyotrichum lanceolatum (lance-leaved American-aster) and the one on the right (purple ray flowers) may be Symphyotrichum leave (smooth American-aster), but I cannot tell for sure. If you can share with me an image of the lower leaves, I would be able to assist with more confidence.
  • Question
    I am confused by a posted sighting of White Snakeroot: "Sighting: Ageratina altissima at 42.2875, -71.82444 by Levin1 on October 16 2016" In Newcomb's wildflower guide p.436, White Snakeroot is called Eupatorium rugosum. Is this a different plant or has the name been changed? Thank You. Joan
    Answer
    Dear joanduprey, yes, the name has changed. The genus Eupatorium has been split into three different genera in new England. They are as follows: Eutrochium (whorled leaves and pink petals), Eupatorium s.s. (opposite leaves and white corollas with smooth lobes), and Ageratina (opposite leaves and white corollas with papillose lobes). Ageratina is further separated from Eupatorium by its involucral bracts of one length and pappus bristles tapering to a fine point (Euptorium has involucral bracts of 3 or more lengths and pappus bristles blunt at the apex). Ageratina altissima is the correct name for the plant referred to as Eupatoriumr rugosum in the Newcomb's wildflower guide.
  • Question
    I photographed this plant in Millers Falls Massachusetts at my sons farm. The land it is located on is conservation protected. Is this a climbing dayflower (commelina diffusa)?
    Answer
    malisayounger, you have photographed a dayflower, but it is Commelina communis (Asiatic dayflower). Note the paler lower petal that is diagnostic of this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Plant is located on rt 122 in Pelham Mass on the side of the road in a lot of growth. There were a large number of these plants and I am trying to figure out what they are and if they are edible.
    Answer
    Dear maliwayounger, you have photographed a species of Ilex (winterberry). I can't tell if you have photographed Ilex verticillata or Ilex laevigata because I cannot see the margins of the persistent sepals on the lower side of the fruit. If you need a more careful determination, just turn a fruit over and take an image for me. No, these are not edible to humans (though they are consumed by wildlife during times of need, such as American robins and red squirrels).
  • Question
    Photos show something that looks like quercus muenlenbergii to me but I gather that is rare so may not be likely. Found 4 individuals on a wooded path between the highway and an office parking lot in Burlington, MA. The tallest is about 20', trunk shown in photo. Also saw aphids on the underside of one leaf as shown which I cannot remember seeing on oak before. The area also has white oak, white pine, viburnum acerifolium, sassafrass, and juniper.
    Answer
    Dear bkatzenberg, you have photographed Castanea dentata (American chestnut). If you note, the leaf blades have fairly pronounced, sharp teeth (Quercus meuhlenbergii would have blunt lobes). Nice find, it is a pleasure to see these trees still growing in New England.
  • Question
    What is this plant's name? Short, occurs in groups, shady forest, needle like leaves. Looked all over internet but cant find picture to identify it. Location found in New Hampshire.
    Answer
    tsobell, you have photographed Huperzia lucidula (shining firmoss), a native component of New England forests and swamps. If you look in the axils of the leaves, you will see yellowish structures (sporangia) that produce the spores. Best wishes.
  • Question
    First time I've ever seen this curious yellow fruit here on the river bank. The plant must have been quite tall when in flower and fully grown, but is now laying down amongst the other growth around it. The Ulverton River (Southern Quebec, Canada) floods abundantly in the spring and often brings new plants to our land, including things I'd rather not see! Thanks for your help in letting me know if this is rare for our latitude? Oh and where it could have come from...
    Answer
    Dear GwynethGrant, you have photographed Triosteum aurantiacum (orange-fruited horse-gentian), a native member of the Caprifoliaceae. These plants are relatively rare in much of New England (I do not know the status in Quebec). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I saw this plant in a county park in upstate New York. Though it looks a bit like Pachysandra, I don't think it is. It had a distinctly succulent-y look to it, thick stems and a juicy look to it. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Kathy, there are no images associated with your question. Without them I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    I think this is an aster, but wasn't able to key it out. Found along dirt road in Sandwich, MA. Pitch Pine-Oak Forest and powerline scrub nearby. Found Oct 5, 2017
    Answer
    Dear massecology, good afternoon. Your plant is Ionactis linariifolia (flax-leaved stiff-aster). This is a native member of the composite family that occurs on well-drained soils and rock outcrops. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I'm trying to ID a small tree. It's 12-15' tall and 6-8' wide, growing on the edge of a dry field with maples, oaks and white pine. Location: southern NH. Thank You
    Answer
    awlwayslooking, it is hard to make a confident determination within this group of willows with images, but it appears to be Salix cinerea (gray willow). If you get a chance to peel the bark from two-year-old branches, you should see elongate ridges on the wood beneath the bark. If you do not see these, let me know and I can ponder the identification further.
  • Question
    I found this mint in Rough Meadows Preserve, Rowley, along a trail close to the salt marsh. I'm guessing it's one of the Water Horehounds, perhaps virginicus?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, you have indeed photograph a species of Lycopus (water-horehound). I would need to see a close-up of the flowers/fruits to be able to tell you which species. The leaf blade serrations suggest a member of the Lycopus americanus complex, but (again) I would need a better image to help you further.
  • Question
    Any suggestions of what to grow under a mature Black Walnut tree that won't make collecting the fallen fruit impossible? I've found dozen of lists online of "jungalone tolerant" plants, but many of the suggestions don't make sense to me - it doesn't seem like a good idea to plant a sugar maple under the canopy of another tree, tolerant or not! Right now there's a patch of black raspberry and some rhubarb; the remainder is dusty wasteland speckled with the remnants of lawn grass. Sudbury, MA.
    Answer
    Dear Kamereone, this is a question for the horticulture department at the New England Wild Flower Society. I suggest you email the horticulture department (nursery@newenglandwild.org) and ask this same question. They may be able to assist you. Good luck!
  • Question
    I was visiting a small slat marsh preserve across Route 1A from Rye Harbor, NH yesterday, Oct 14, and there were many of these milkweed-looking plants. I am used to (I guess) Common Milkweed and these did not have the same pods I am used to seeing... Do you think this is a milkweed or something else? Thank you very much!
    Answer
    Dear kayakranger, you have photographed Erechtites hieraciifolius (American burnweed), a native member of the Asteraceae. This species can be found inland on disturbed or exposed soils and also in saline marshes. The hairs are to assist with dispersal of the fruit. Best wishes.
  • Question
    found at shirui hills, ukhrul manipur, india
    Answer
    Dear Enfogal, I can't identify the plant for you--I'm sorry for this. India is a long way from my area of expertise (Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America). If you would like to find someone in your area who can help, I may be able to assist with this. Just email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can locate someone with plant expertise near you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here is a plant I feel I know well, yet I don't know what to call it. In Wikipedia, it is referred to as Northern Bayberry, Myrica pensylvanica, and Morella pensylvanica. The MA costal plant ID Guide calls it Myrica pensylvanica, and it seems to be listed in Go Botany as Small Bayberry, Morella carolinensis. Moreover, the distribution map in your website shows a much more southern distribution than does the map in Wikipedia. Can you make sense of this confusion?
    Answer
    chaffeemonell, The genus Myrica has been subdivided into two genera: Myrica (in the strict sense) with compressed achenes not encrusted by wax that are enclosed in two accrescent bracts and Morella with spherical achenes encrusted by wax that are subtended (but not enclosed by) 4-6 small bracts. Our species of bayberry is Morella caroliniensis. The northern and southern bayberries have been shown to significantly overlap in morphology and represent a north to south cline of phenotypes (i.e., there are no gaps in the morphology, but a gradual change from north to south). Therefore, one, variable species is recognized rather than a northern and southern species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Greetings, This plant was plucked from the roadside of Route 56 in Leicester, MA. It stood about a third of a meter in height. I know the two pictures are not ideal, but the specimen is currently being pressed. Any ideas? Many thanks, as ever. --Carl
    Answer
    Dear Carl, I can't identify your plant with confidence without additional images (especially of the fruits). It looks very much like Bidens polylepis (Ozark beggar-ticks). This is an infrequent non-native composite that has been found primarily in southern New England. You might start there with your study.
  • Question
    I saw this tree in Shelton, CT, at 41.337836,-73.123555. I think it's a mockernut hickory, but I see no teeth on the leaflets, and the undersides of the leaves do not seem hairy to me, although I see some hairs on the leaf stems. The bark is not flaky. The nuts are close to round.
    Answer
    Dear David, assuming the tree is native (i.e., not planted), it does appear to be closest to Carya tomentosa (mockernut hickory). Hairs on the abaxial surface of the leaflets is not always permanent this late in the season. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Growing along small stream Williston VT 9/19/17
    Answer
    Dear joshl, your plant is Xanthium strumarium (cocklebur), a member of the aster family. The distinctive burrs that enclose the flowers/fruits are a good method of identification (note that the burrs do not resemble Arctium [burdock]). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Helianthus divaricatus? Along small stream Williston VT 9/17/17. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear joshl, there is no image associated with your question. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hello, When we touch a plant, do some of the living cells from the plant get on or stick to our skin? If the living plant cells do get on our skin, do the cells stay functioning in any way while on our skin? Thank you very much in advance,
    Answer
    AloeYou650, depending on the species in question, plants do sometimes transfer compounds to our skin, such as resins, mucilage, oils, etc. These compounds (or phytochemicals) do sometimes exert and action on our skin, such as imparting an aroma or causing an allergy, the duration of which would depend on the chemical in question. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Can you help identify trailing composite from cultivated bed outside Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary's visitor center? Don't think it's Packera.... Thanks, Connie Parks
    Answer
    Dear Connie, I have been reviewing the images of this plant for awhile and have asked others to assist. I'm sorry that no one recognizes the plant in the images. If you end up identifying the species (which is not a Packera, as you noted), please let me know what you find out at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Thank you.
  • Question
    Hi the plants in the picture are in Waltham MA. We have a stream in our backyard And the plant is growing in mostly shade- not sure if this info will prove more insight. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Ekuno, there are no images associated with your question. Without them, I can't help you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist.
  • Question
    Hi, just wondering which rue this is. I haven't seen it bloom yet. I'd like to know if it's native to NE and NY. Thank you! I got it at a plant swap in NY.
    Answer
    Dear KathyMcG, I'm sorry I can't help you. There are several native and non-native plants the species in the photographs could be. Without flowers or fruits, I won't be able to give you any confident answer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    please tell me what do you call this??I found it near connecticut riverin Wilder Vermont...thanks
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, there is no image associated with your question. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help you.
  • Question
    First time this one has been seen. Within 50 feet of Cobbet's Pond in Windham, NH. I have not enhanced the image at all. Love to know what it is. Lots of mushrooms popping up within the last week, I'm guessing this is a fungi of some sort.
    Answer
    Dear JimB49, you've photographed the fruits of Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-pulpit). The leaves and enfolding spathe have senesced, but the fruits remain later in the season. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I grabbed a sample of Bidens from a narrow alluvial flat, just upstream from the Florida Rd Bridge over the Assebett in Maynard. It appears have the characteristics B. eatonii, but the non-estuarine habitat seems wrong. It's tucked in at the bottom of the Pontederia image. Is my ID likely?
    Answer
    Dear wlgeek, good morning. It is most likely you have photographed Bidens connata (purple-stemmed beggars-ticks). The cypselas are not as flat as they would be in Bidens eatonii and lack the longitudinal striations normally found in that plant. Bidens connata usually has a compressed-rhombic fruit (in cross-section), so this causes confusion in the identification keys. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi I live in Rhode Island and found this plant in my yard, trying to find out what it is. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear Jonzin99, you have photographed Arbutilon theophrasti (velvetleaf), a non-native member of the mallow family. This plant almost always is associated with cultivated soils and does not naturalize well to pristine settings. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in Rhode Island and found this growing in my garden do you know what it is? Thank you
    Answer
    Dear Jonzin99, you have photographed a species of Datura (thorn-apple), a member of the nightshade family. These are species that are occasionally found as naturalized plants, especially in agricultural settings. It is like Datura stramonium (thorn-apple), the most common species encountered in the region. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I live in southern Maine and I have a bunch of this plant in my back yard, someone said it could possibly be poison sumac, if that’s the case obviously I need to take special precautions before removing it, any help identifying it would be helpful
    Answer
    Dear tratoras, The plant in the image appears to be a non-native species of Lonicera, such as Lonicera morrowii (Morrow's honeysuckle). It has simple, opposite, and entire leaves (poison-sumac has pinnately compound, alternate leaves). Lonicera morrowii is a non-native and invasive species that is becoming increasingly common in parts of Maine.
  • Question
    I wonder if this plant is the red berried elder. It started growing years ago, under a bird feeder and right next to the house. It had little white flowers and red berries at one point, but I had to cut it back since the wood was rotting on the house. I was thinking of moving it, but if I have IDed it correctly, one article said it was "short lived." is this a red berried elder, and what do you know about this plants longevity? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear CarolinChesterfield, the plant you have photographed is not red elderberry (Sambcus racemosa), a species with pinnately compound leaves (the plant in the image has simple leaves). Based on the leaf arrangement and ridges on the branches, it appears to be Euonymus alatus (winged spindle-tree), a non-native and somewhat invasive species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I bought this plant at the Northampton plant sale about four years ago. It was listed as a Japanese Clethra. It is a shrub with two main branches and many side branches, and is now about six feet high. It has not flowered. I was wondering if it was mislabeled and is a native plant. It does not get a lot of sun but it does grow every year. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear CarolinChesterfield, good morning. I can't help you confirm he identification of this plant. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I do not have expertise in Asian species (I'm sorry). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I believe I've narrowed this down to a Salix discolor / pussy willow. Can you confirm? It was found near Yellowstone in lodgepole pines and a quaken aspen woodland environment.
    Answer
    Brice, I'm sorry that I can't help you as much as I would like. In order to help you confirm the identification of this willow, I would need to see the underside of the leaf blades (not just the top surface) and a close-up of the branchlet so I could see the stipules (if present). The leaf blade outline certainly appears like it could be Salix discolor, but I wouldn't be able to confirm that with just this image. If you have other images, upload them and I will try to help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Fount this plant on 9/9/17 at Joppa Flats Education Center in Newburyport. The small flowers reminded me of beggar-ticks, but then the plant form was quite different.
    Answer
    Dear chafeemonell, as best I can tell, this is a species of American-aster that is in bud. It looks much like Symphyotrichum lanceolatum (lance-leaved American-aster), a common species of wetlands, ditches, low fields, and such habitats. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This vine keeps showing up in my yard everywhere any idea what it is? I live in Rhode Island thanks
    Answer
    Dear Jonzin99, this vine is a species of Fallopia (bindweed), a member of the knotweed family. I can't tell you which species without some close-up images of the flowers and the nodes where the leaves emerge. It may be Fallopia scandens (climbing bindweed).
  • Question
    Hello, I found a plant on a traprock outcrop in New Britain, CT at the edge of the tree canopy (partial shade). It looks very similar to holy basil in my garden (Ocimum tenuiflorum) but is not near any garden or farm. Please identify thanks
    Answer
    Dear James_Cowen, you've photographed Elschotzia ciliata (crested late-summer-mint), a non-native member of the mint family. It is naturalized here and there, especially in southern New England and is sometimes found in relatively pristine places. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This isa wild flower I found near Connecticut river in Wilder Vermont.What s it?thank you
    Answer
    Dear Switbut3rfly, there are no images attached to your question here. Without images, I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hi,this was found in Vt. Nesr Connecticut river..what is it?thank you
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, you've photographed a species of Thalictrum (meadow-rue), most likely Thalictrum pubescens (tall meadow-rue), a native member of the crowfoot family. This is a common plant of shorelines, wet openings, and such places.
  • Question
    No flower, just leaves. Located in a terrestrial setting in Massachusetts. I think it's a false spiraea, but I'm not sure. I would appreciate any help you can provide. Thank you Emma
    Answer
    Dear emoakes, your plant is Rhus glabra (smooth sumac), a native shrub found in the cashew family. It grows in colonies and is much like Rhus typhina (staghorn sumac) except that the branches are without hairs and covered by a whitish bloom. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I found this strange-looking vine growing on the Joppa Flats grounds in Newburyport in September. Among the lianas, I couldn't find anything with seeds like it. The seeds look very like elm seeds.
    Answer
    Dear chafeemonell, you've photographed a species of Fallopia (bindweed). It looks most like Fallopia scandens (climbing bindweed), a native member of the knotweed family, but I can't tell for certain without a close view of the nodes, where the stipules can be observed. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can't find this plant in your listings. It may not be there since it is located in Idaho near Yellowstone. Woodland area. Do you know what it is? Picture taken in August. Thank you. Brice
    Answer
    Dear Brice, your plant looks like Maianthemum stellatum or a related species. The leaf blade outline and fruit outline are good matches for this species (and the dark fruits are possible in this species, who often produces red fruits). I would check with that species and see how well you feel it fits for your memory of this species in the field.
  • Question
    Is this aletris farinosa? It doesn't really have a basal rosette and it seems smaller than as described in online guides. Picture from Limerick, Maine.
    Answer
    Dear dmkrusch, good morning. You've photographed Spiranthes cernua (nodding ladies'-tresses), a native orchid that flowers in the late summer. Notice that the flowers are zygomorphic (i.e., bilaterally symmetrical) and lacks the roughened sepals and petals (Aletris farinosa would have actinomorphic flowers and roughed sepals and petals). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in Warm Broad-leaved forest, please help me to get the scientific name of this plant.
    Answer
    Dear Sonam1490, good morning. I'm sorry I cannot help you with your identification. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (i.e., northeastern United States). While I am happy to entertain all plant related questions, and can sometimes help with questions originating in other countries, this is an example of a time I can't assist. If you need help finding expertise closer to you, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you.
  • Question
    I don't have a question about a particular plant, but I wanted to ask a botanist about something that's been making me curious. If a plant, either it's stem or leaves, or petals, had been subject to a snake's venom, how would it react? Would there be discoloration or would it begin to die? I tried to look it up online, but I couldn't find anything.
    Answer
    Dear Hemlock, I cannot answer your question. I don't think that venomous snakes bite plants for any reason (i.e., the question would be purely an academic pursuit). I'm sorry I don't have an answer for you.
  • Question
    Hi,I have more to asked you but I wasn't sure if all the photos went thru when I uploaded them.I cannot see them here but it says "uploading" though.anyway,what kind if plant is this?please tell.me.Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, you've had many images upload and I've been answering your identification questions. If you ever have trouble, you can always attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help you.
  • Question
    This was found in maawanaka conservation down in Wilder Vt..Please tell me what kind of plant it us..thank you
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, this non-native shrub is Frangula alnus (glossy-buckthorn), a member of the buckthorn family. It is a highly invasive species that can aggressively crowd native vegetation.
  • Question
    This plants didnt grow tall but it has like fruit in it..what is it? find them in kilowatt park near connecticut river..thanks!
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, this is a native shrub called Viburnum acerifolium (maple-leaved viburnum). It is found (usually) in forested areas.
  • Question
    I found them near connecticut river in Wilder Vt. What is.it?thanks
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, you've pictured a non-native liana called Celastrus orbiculatus (Oriental bittersweet). The capsules (the yellow structures) will mature a more orange color.
  • Question
    Central MA. This plant showed up suddenly and in such massive numbers I think the seeds may have come in with last year's hay which ends up as garden mulch. Highly invasive, sun to partial shade, ~2 feet high. Flowering reminds me of nettles, but doesn't seem to match overall description. Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Quinn, this is Pilea pumila (Canada clearweed). It is a native, herbaceous plant.
  • Question
    Central MA. This plant showed up suddenly and in such massive numbers I think the seeds may have come in with last year's hay which ends up as garden mulch. Highly invasive, sun to partial shade, ~2 feet high. Flowering reminds me of nettles, but doesn't seem to match overall description. Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear Quinn, your plant is Pilea pumila (Canada clearweed). This is a native member of the stinging-nettle family that is typically found in rich, moist forests, especially those along rivers. Best wishes.
  • Question
    ..I found them in Wilder Vt near Connecticut river..what is it?thank you.
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, you've photographed Elaeagnus umbellata (autumn-olive), a non-native member of the autumn-olive family that is found throughout much of New England. While invasive, this plant also produces a delicious fruit. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What do you call this.one?they are on the road in Wilder Vt..thanks
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, good morning. You have photographed a species of Setaria (foxtail). It is likely Setaria pumila (yellow foxtail), but I cannot tell this for certain from the photograph.
  • Question
    What kind if f plant is this? It was located near kilowatt trail in Wilder Veemont.Thanks
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, the plant you have photographed is Rhamnus cathartica (European buckthorn). It is a non-native shrub that can be aggressive at colonizing some areas.
  • Question
    Hi,this was all over kilowatt park in Wilder Vt.What are thety ?thanks
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, this is Rhus typhina (staghorm sumac). This one is fruiting and if you examine the fruits closely, you will see they are covered with red, sour-tasting hairs.
  • Question
    Hi,I found this near Connecticut River when I was walking to tthe kilowatt trail..what are they?Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, you've photographed Rhus typhina (staghorn sumac). This is a native shrub in the cashew family that produces red, hairy fruits. When a leaf is bruised, it will exude a white latex. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi,I have more to asked you but I wasn't sure if all the photos went thru when I uploaded them.I cannot see them here but it says "uploading" though.anyway,what kind if plant is this?please tell.me.Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Switbut3rfly, good morning. You have photographed a species of Toxicodendron (poison-ivy). It looks like it may be Toxicodendron rydbergii (western poison-ivy), a species that does not climb into trees but, rather, is a small shrub. If I knew the location of the photograph, I would be able to be more confident in the answer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This large cluster is in the Native plant garden in Milton Mass' Trailside museum. We can't identify it. The seed pods resemble Amsonia, but that is the only similarity. The foliage is not alternate. The cluster is around 3 feet tall.
    Answer
    Dear Cpaxhia, I don't recognize this species, though it does have resemblance to species of Amsonia (as you note). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Planted species can originate from many areas in the world outside of my area of expertise. I'm sorry I can't help you.
  • Question
    Good evening. I had submitted an inquiry yesterday but failed indicate the location. I live in Malden, just north of Boston. One weed that has perplexed me is a heart shaped broad-leafed weed with tuber-like roots. It resembles garlic mustard, but lacks the classic shape and smell. The attached image is of the root sytem of this weed. What is it?
    Answer
    califyank, I cannot locate your original image. Can you resubmit this or email it to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org so that I can have both images to help with a determination? Thank you.
  • Question
    Hi, I found these growing in my backyard and would like to know what they are. The first picture- the leaves look similar to some mountain laurel we have growing nearby but I'm not sure.
    Answer
    Dear Ekuno, your first plant with the white flowers is Ageratina altissima (white snakeroot). The second plant (vegetative) I'm not sure on, it may be a Hydrangea seedling or something similar. Knowing the location (generally, such as what state these images were taken in) would help with the identification process. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm stumped. This is all over the place now, going to seed in white, fluffy puffs. 6" to 7' tall. No petals that I can see. Smooth stems. It's not wild lettuce. What do you think? Thanks, Julia
    Answer
    Dear Jbrine1, you've photographed Erechtities hieraciifolius (American burnweed), a native member of the composite family. These plants frequent disturbed and cleared areas.
  • Question
    Hi, a friend took this picture in a field in Western Mass., Would love an ID. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Alisaleigh, you've photographed Verbena hastata (blue vervain), a native member of the vervain family. It grows in opening and along shorelines. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I don't know if this is a gall or a plant I don't recognize. It was photographed in the Helderburg Escarpment, NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, I'm not sure--it looks like it may be a gall, perhaps on goldenrod, that is causing unusual growth. Very interesting for sure.
  • Question
    These plants were regenerating in a moist forest clearing (small clearcut) in Somerset County in late June. Can you help me to ID?
    Answer
    Dear Skytes, try a comparison with Scutellaria lateriflora mad-dog skullcap). Some leaves of this species are thin, but those growing in the open can be think and rugose (conspicuously veiny). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm having a hard time identifying this plant, there appears to be just this one in a small open field. It's growing with goldenrod,asters, raspberries etc. Thank you Dolly
    Answer
    Dear alwayslooking, compare this with the leaves of some species of Nabalus (rattlesnake-root). I think you will find it a close match. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I took more photos of the potential Euphorbia nutans. It is upright, standing close to 10" tall. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, thank you. Can you confirm short hairs on the stem. If so, I think you have certainly photographed Euphorbia nutans.
  • Question
    This plant was found in a dry sandy area in Woodlawn Preserve, NY. I suspect that it is Jimsonweed. Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed Xanthium strumarium (rough cocklebur), a member of the Asteraceae. Jimsonweed (genus Datura) has a four-valved capsule for a fruit, rather than achenes enclosed within a but-like involucre. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi,can you please tell me the name of this tree and the species ...its grows in our backyard...thanks!
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, you've photographed a species of oak (genus Quercus). I can't tell you which one with certainly without a close-up image of the winter buds (which would be well-formed now). It is likely northern red oak (Quercus rubra), but I would need the winter buds to confirm this. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please help me identify the species of this ..this grows in our backyard and its a talk tree...thank you
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, you've photographed a species of spruce (genus Picea). I can't tell you which one without an image of the tree and a close up of the branchlet. Hopefully, knowing it is a spruce can provide the help you need.
  • Question
    Hello. I found this plant regenerating in a moist forest opening in Somerset County, Maine. I am guessing it is in the aster family. Can you help with ID?
    Answer
    Dear Skytes, good afternoon. It looks like you may have two different plants. The first one (above view) may be Solidago rugosa (wrinkle-leaved goldenrod). The second I'm unsure of, but the opposite leaves and rugose texture of the blades suggest (possibly) Scutellaria lateriflora (mad-dog skullcap). I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Hi, I found this plant in a field growing with goldenrod,asters and raspberries. I've looked through a number of wildflower books but cannot ID it. Hope you can help, Thank You
    Answer
    Dear alwayslooking, it is likely a species of Nabalus (rattlesnake-root), native members of the composite family. If this is near you, you can tear a portion of the leaf and it should exude a white latex. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please help.me identify the common species name of this plant.I include a picture of the leaves..thank you
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, you've photographed a species of linden (genus Tilia), sometimes called basswood. I can't tell you which species because I would need to see more of the plant. When you can, be sure to include the location of the plants you photographed as knowing where in the world the plants were growing is an important part of the identification process. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi,what do you call this type if maple tree leaf????please let me know.Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear switbut3rfly, good afternoon. The leaf looks like it was taken from a Norway maple (Acer platanoides), a non-native tree that originated in Europe. It is frequently planted and sometimes escapes cultivation in New England.
  • Question
    Hello, I found these in a swampy area in Wayland, MA. The area is within a kettle hole that fill and empties seasonally. Thanks for your help identifying.
    Answer
    Dear Sheila, you have photographed Bidens cernua (nodding beggar-ticks), a native member of the composite family that is found in wetlands and along shorelines. Thanks for sharing the nice images.
  • Question
    I enlarged the Sandmat that I sent you. I'm not sure that you can see the detail you need. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, thank you. That does help a little. But I still can't be perfectly confident. It looks closest to Euphorbia nutans, a species that tends to be more upright than the other species and less profusely branches. It is a native species, and fairly rare in New England (though I do not know of its rarity in NY). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this plant in the same habitat as my earlier submission regarding the Polypodium. Not sure if it is considered an herbaceous plant or a small shrub. It looked like Red Elderberry and also somewhat akin to Red Baneberry. Not sure if the leaves are considered once or twice compound. Interesting variation of leaf shape!
    Answer
    Chaffeemonell, your plant is Aralia racemosa (American spikenard), a member of the Apiaceae. It is a native member of mesic, often rich and/or rocky, forests. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Arthur, I'm trying to ID an orchid; I think it's either Spiranthes cernua or ochroleuca. The labellum bends downward and is slightly yellow, but I don't know if it's enough to be S. ochroleuca. I took a photo with Ted Elliman's book (ruler), thinking I'd measure the gap between the lateral & upper sepals, but I'm afraid I don't have a clue what to measure. Dedham MA; habitat is a bit unusual, sandy area adjacent to boggy soil - arid wetlands? At least 2 leaves on stem, no basal leaves present.
    Answer
    Dear stephradner, there is a good chance your plant is Spiranthes ochrolecua. The separation of the lateral sepals from the dorsal petal fits this taxon very well (there is a gap between the narrow perianth segments when viewed from the side). The labellum is usually curved a bit more, but I think part of the issue is that the upper flowers of the inflorescence have just opened (the lower flowers fit for S. ochroleuca). It is difficult to identify these plants when not viewing them in person, so I apologize for any hesitation in the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This flower was found near a stream in Saratoga County NY. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you plant looks like Helianthus decapetalus (thin-leaved sunflower). It is a common, native species along streams and rivers. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This small plant was found in a very dry sandy area of Woodlawn Preserve. I'm guessing it's a Euphorbia? Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, this is a species of Euphorbia, specifically these are in section Chamaesyce (called sandmat). I can't tell you which species you have because I need a close-up of the stem and the capsules to see if they are pubescent or not. If you have those images, upload them and I will be able to help further.
  • Question
    By the Sonesta hotel in Cambridge
    Answer
    Dear whtien@gmail.com, the plant with white flowers is Symphyotrichum pilosum (awl American-aster) and the plant with pink flowers is a member of the Malva neglecta complex (common mallow). There are four species in this complex, and I would need fruits to help separate the species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you help with identify this plant please, found in the woods of Biddeford Maine. It looked like fur from away, felt course.
    Answer
    Dear dmorin31+, I'm not sure I can answer based on the image attached. It reminds me of species of ferns where the persistent leaf bases are left as these dark fibers. However, I would need to see the plant in person to help you with confidence. Best wishes.
  • Question
    There are common in my area, an urban area and people think they are weeds and pull them out in the garden. Cambridge, MA
    Answer
    Dear whiten@gmail.com, I can identify most of these plants, but I don't want the names to get lost in all these images. We need to upload them singularly or email them (ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org) singularly so I can make sure there is no confusion with what names go to which plants. I want to help, but I want to be sure there isn't any confusion. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. Everything about this plant looks like Wild Carrot, but in minature: foot high, diameter of inflorescence size of a quarter or less, nothing like any similar plants in Peterson. The Daucus pusillus (American Wild Carrot) is a western, possibly southern plant. Now coming north? Fully formed. Daucus carota is in the same area, but nothing like this fully-formed small one. On the edge of a paved parking lot in woodland area, on a ridge, not swampy. Ossining, NY. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear juliwoo, thanks for your images. I'm not sure exactly who you have there, but it doesn't look like Daucus pusilla. That written, images in fruit would be really helpful if possible. I would need a close-up of the fruits and the entire array of them to better determine who this plant is. If you have a clear image of the leaves, I might be able to do more now. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is found in my back yard. I have about 20 pictures/questions. Can I send it to you a different way so I can upload more than just one picture at a time? I have been looking for wild plants in the urban area near the road and on the edges of things--where they will be pulled or mowed over. I collected all summer long and are using them for an exhibition that will open on 9/22. Would love to know what they are, fast. Thank you thank you!!
    Answer
    Dear whiten@gmail.com, you have photographed Bidens frondosa (Devil's-beggar ticks), a native species of shorelines and disturbed soils. The fruits (which look like seeds) have barbed bristles that allow them to attach to fur and clothing (for dispersal). If you would like to send more images, send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can help you out. Please be sure that you include location and habitat information for each plant. Thank you and best wishes.
  • Question
    This aster was found near a pond in Woodlawn Preserve, NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, for the American-asters, I need to see leaves and a side-view of the capitulum (flower head) so I can the involucral bracts. Without those features, I can't help confidently because there are several this plant could be (Symphyotrichum pilosum, S. dumosum, S. lanceolatum). Sorry I can't help you without more information.
  • Question
    This mostly dead flower was found in a dry sandy area in Woodlawn Preserve NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, I'm sorry, without the leaves, I can't identify the plant. There are several possibilities for a composite with small, yellow capitula made up of entirely ray flowers. If you are able to capture an image of the leaves, send one along so I can try to help further.
  • Question
    I am seeking a native sedge to help stabilize a hillside after a tornado in Concord MA in August 2016. The south facing kame hillside was formerly shady but is now partially sunny and dry. The hillside includes 1840-50s garden terraces sculpted by Bronson Alcott. I am imagining a soft carpet of woodland sedge to accentuate the terraces which are now vulnerable to erosion due to loss of tree cover. Can you recommend a species and seed source?
    Answer
    Dear Margie, A native sedge would be a wonderful way to help stabilize a bank; however, finding a source for the seeds or seedlings may not be easy. Carex pensylvanica (Pennsylvania sedge) would be a good choice because it is common and colonial (i.e., forms extensive colonies by rhizome growth). If you can't find a source for this, email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will see if I can help you further.
  • Question
    I found this polypody around Ausable Chasm near the western shore of Lake Champlain. Your guide only mentions 2 similar species, but the sign labels it as Polypodium vulgare. I thought this might be an older synonym for one of those species, though this is not mentioned in your guide. I thought if the managers of the site are incorrect in their signage, they should be notified. Can you clarify? BTW, Wikipedia describes the species P. vulgare, so they might need to be corrected as well.
    Answer
    chaffeemonell, Polypodium vulgare is a name that was used quite some time ago when several species were all recognized broadly as one variable species. The plants you have photographed look like Polypodium appalachianum (Appalachian polypody), which has more pointed leaflets and a +/- triangular leaf blade. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A grove of about 30 small trees on Lexington's Lower Vinebrook path. No fruits or flowers seen but it seems sort of like the Asimina Triloba I got at NEWFS a few weeks ago.
    Answer
    Dear bkatzenberg, the plants you've photographed do look like Asimina triloba. I'm unaware of any naturalized occurrences in New England. Do you know if these were planted? It would be great to discuss this occurrence with you further to identify if these trees are spreading from the original source (i.e., are naturalizing). My email is ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I would appreciate discussing this with you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I'm just trying to identify this moss? Seen on an old woodland road near Lake George NY... It was not growing on the birch bark, that was my plate. Growing on clay soil. thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Rustybear, I can only help you a little. You've photographed a liverwort, which is not a vascular plant. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild tracheophytes (i.e., higher vascular plants) of the northeast. If you examine some images from the web of liverworts, you'll see the high resemblance to your plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thank you for answering my question about the Fumaria-looking species in Waltham! I will watch for flowers. Is it also possible that it is Capnoides sempervirens? This was suggested to me because it is a sunny, recently disturbed site. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear meridione, yes, it is possible, but the leaf blade outlines and robustness of the leaves suggested to me otherwise. But, Capnoides sempervirens is in the same family and the leaves are similar enough it could be that species. When you discover which one, please let me know. You can email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and thank you.
  • Question
    I found this plant in Penny Lake Preserve and was wondering if you could identify it for me. Some of the leaves were a remarkable blue color and I'm uncertain whether it was like the red leaves on a poinsettia, of whether the leaves were turning their autumn colors. (see attached image) 43.858972, -69.628826
    Answer
    Dear Kurt, you've photographed Solanum dulcamara (climbing nightshade), a non-native member of the nightshade family. The leaves sometimes turn that color this time of year and make for a really wonderful image. Thanks for sharing your photograph.
  • Question
    This shrub was found in a marshy area of the Hudson River in South Glens Falls NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed Frangula alnus (glossy-buckthorn), a non-native member of the Rhamnaceae. This species is very invasive in most parts of the northeastern US.
  • Question
    This spent plant was found near a pond in the Adirondacks. I could not find another bloom in better condition, I'm sorry. Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you have a species of Lythrum (loosestrife), but I can't tell you which species you've found. I simply can't see the leaf arrangement and the flower arrangement in the axils of the bracts well enough to give you a confident answer. Perhaps knowing the genus will help you determine who you have.
  • Question
    This shrub? tree? popped up in an area where we planted lilacs. It is currently about 12-15inches tall. Can you help identify it? Many thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Lisabailey, you appear to have a Malus (apple, crabapple) sapling. I can't tell you which species without seeing flowers and/or fruits. There are several species of non-native apple this could be. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I understand there are many kinds of coleus plants. However, I can not find the name of the coleus in my attachment. Would you be kind enough to identify the coleus in the attachment?
    Answer
    Dear mlewis4647, I'm sorry I cannot help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeast. Cultivated plants are outside of my realm of expertise. I wish I could assist, but in this case, I am unable to.
  • Question
    One more image...sorry...
    Answer
    Likely Epilobium ciliatum (fringed willow-herb). Thank you for supplying additional images. It is really helpful to me.
  • Question
    Sorry, here are the images.
    Answer
    Dear Jbrine1, you have photographed a species of Epilobium (willow-herb), this one a native member of the evening-primrose family. You likely have Epilobium ciliatum (fringed willow-herb), though I would need to see the hairs of the fruits to be confident of this answer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is the attached photograph one of Aureolaria pedicularia? I took this photograph yesterday on Rattlesnake Island in Lake Winnipesaukee. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Peggy, I'm sorry, but there is no image associated with your question. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you.
  • Question
    Can you tell me what type of plant, or the name of this plant? My daughter saw it in Cincinnati and was wondering what it is? Thanks so much.
    Answer
    Dear bspacher1951, I'm sorry that I cannot help you. While the plant looks like Perilla frutescens (perilla-mint), that species normally has darker leaves when they have red coloration (i.e., they are more dark maroon). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. Cultivated plants can hail from many locations in the world that are outside of my region of expertise. I apologize that I can't be of more assistance in this case.
  • Question
    Just a simple gardening question: can two plants grown from the same fruit cross pollinate each other? For example: If I have two tomatillo vines that are flowering, which were grown from seeds originally from the same single tomatillo fruit, can they cross pollinate? What are the limitations around cross pollination, if there are any? Thanks!!
    Answer
    Dear JeffUSA, I can't answer your question because I'm simply not knowledgeable enough in the pollination biology of members of the nightshade. There are different kinds of outcrossing (e.g., pollen going to another flower on the same plant, pollen going to another flower on a different plant). It would require someone with specific knowledge of this group. I'm guessing (and only guessing) that pollination would be successful in the situation you are describing. Sorry I can't be of assistance.
  • Question
    Great website, really love what you have got going on here, Could you please identify the attached plant pictures of fruit and leaves and confirm if the species is Synsepalum dulcificum (known as Miracle fruit, miracle berry) Pictures where taken of the plant near my house in karnataka India.(not England) Please let me know if any additional pictures are required to further identify it correctly. thanks a lot in advance.
    Answer
    Dear sanketh, you are asking about plants that I have no expertise with; therefore, please take my comments with that in mind. From comparing imagery, I can see that the leaf blades of your plants do not match the typical shape of Synsepalum dulciferum, which taper more narrowly to the base and are widest beyond the middle (yours do not have an elongate taper at the base and are not obviously widest beyond the middle of the blade). Also, your plants show more elongate calyx segments at the base of the fruit vs. Synsepalum dulciferum, which have short sepals in fruit. While I can't be 100% confident, your plants do not seem to be this species (or at least are not the usual expression of it). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Several of these plants popped up last spring at a site in Waltham where we are building a garden. The area where it is growing was formerly a thicket of bittersweet and buckthorn that we ripped out a year and half ago. Everything else that popped up I could recognize as a garden weed of some kind, but not this one. It came up in June but has not flowered yet. Any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear meridione, I can't tell you for certain which species you have photographed without seeing flowers or fruits. It appears you may have a member of the poppy family, specifically species related to Fumaria (e.g., bleeding heart, Dutchman's breeches). Dicentra and Lamprocapnos are the genus of these plants. Perhaps you could keep an eye out for flowers if they appear in future years. Sorry I can't be of more definitive help.
  • Question
    https://newfs.s3.amazonaws.com/upload_images/question/jeannette_0e34fdd6b938a1bb447b36c3f36a18b9.jpg I think that the following is a Northern Bugleweed (Lycopus uniflorus)? On Cape Cod, along a small road in a disturbed area, in a moist/wet area. Others disagree and say it's American Water Horehound (Lycopus americanus). Is Northern Bugleweed synonymous with Northern Water Horehound? Are they both Lycopus uniflorus?
    Answer
    Jeanette, good afternoon. I can't tell you which species of Lycopus you have without a closer image of the flowers/fruits. Important for the identification of these species is the sepals, petals, and fruits (small characters that require close inspection). If you have an image that is closer to the plant, I should be able to help you.
  • Question
    Location: Toronto, Canada. I have attached one more picture, this is all I have.
    Answer
    Dear Iris, I'm sorry I can't help you any more. Even the location doesn't give me any additional information about who this plant is. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is an ornamental on the campus of Becker College, Worcester. I give you pictures of the leaves, flowers, and bark, all taken in the beginning of September. Thank you for your continued help. --Carl
    Answer
    Dear Carl, you've photographed Heptacodium miconioides (seven sons plant), a member of the Caprifoliaceae native to China. I hope this is helpful. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A clump of these ferns were found in the Helderbergs of NY along a marsh trail. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, You've photographed Athyrium angustum (northern lady fern). This is a common, native component of many wetlands in the northeast. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this the Northern Bugleweed (Lycopus uniflorus)? is it the same as the Northern Water-Horehound? Location: Cape Cod, in a disturbed moist/wet area, on the edge of a small road. I'd like to know that I'm on the right track. I recognized it as a plant in the mint family but had never seen the Bugleweed before. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Jeanettte, you have photographed a species of Lycopus, but I cannot tell you with confidence which one. To do this, I would need a closer image of the flowers so that I can see the petals and sepals clearly. If you can upload this or send it to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I can try to help you further.
  • Question
    location: Toronto, Canada I need help in identifying the plant attached. It had lots of thin beans and narrow leafs, they were growing in wilderness until the construction came up on the site. The plants used to attract loads of house finch, I want to re-plant them to attract the birds. Any help to identify the plant would help a ton.
    Answer
    Dear Iris, I'm sorry I cannot help you. I would need more images of the plant, including the stems, leaves, and closer view of the fruits. It appears to be a member of the Brassicaceae (mustard family), but I can't do more without additional images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant was found near the shore of the Hudson River in the Adirondacks of NY Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you have photographed Dasiphora floribunda (shrubby-cinquefoil), native, woody species that are often planted for ornament. When found in their native habitat, this species often indicates increased soil pH. They are found in wetlands, on shorelines, and on cliffs (and rarely in fields overlaying circumneutral bedrock).
  • Question
    This plant is growing in my yard in Beverly MA, near a tidal river. Morning sun, afternoon shade. I have been here for four years, it has "flowered" biennially. I can't say for sure that it is "wild", since I have never seen anything like it anywhere. It is the only one in my yard, so it doesn't seem to spread on its own. I would like to identify it, and if it is rare or endangered, I would consider donating it to a qualified recipient. Thanks, Joe Mahan
    Answer
    Dear mysterjoe, you appear to have photographed a species of Eucomis (pineapple-lily), which are members of the Asparagaceae (asparagus family) native to the African continent. There are approximately 11 species in the world--I'm sorry I cannot help you determine exactly which one you have.
  • Question
    I purchased this perennial in Northern NJ 10 years ago. I forgot its name. Have never seen another like it, have searched plant data bases but have not been able to identify it. Hope someone can help. Plant dies back completely every winter. New growth of about 6 stems in late spring eventually reaches 4 feet tall and wide. Blooms in late August. The flowers clusters grow only in the angle formed between stem and petiole, about 5 clusters per stem. Each deep purple flower has 4 recurved petals
    Answer
    Dear northorange, I'm sorry I cannot help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Some cultivated species we do recognize, but in this case, we don't. Given they can hail from many parts of the world, it is difficult to have knowledge of all of them. I'm sorry I can't help this time.
  • Question
    This plant was found at the edge of a man made pond near Albany NY. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, the plant is called Penthorum sedoides (ditch-stonecrop), a native wetland plant in the Penthoraceae. It can grow in wet soil and even can be found sometimes in standing water.
  • Question
    This fern was found along a path in a marsh near Stillwell, NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you have photographed a species of Thelypteris or Parathelypteris (in the Thelypteridaceae). I can't see the base of the leaf blade in order to share which species it is with confidence, but it is likely Thelypteris palustris (marsh fern), a native species of wetlands. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this unusual plant or part of a plant in a sample of submerged plants from Clarks Pond, Amesbury, MA. Do you have any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, the plant you have photographed is Ricciocarpus natans (purple-fringed riccia), an aquatic liverwort that is found commonly floating on the surface of the water. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant or weed has been taking over our backyard. Very very slowly but each year it's a bit more. I have two small children and want to make sure it's not poisonous. We live in Nebraska.
    Answer
    Dear dsullsperger, the plant you are interested in is Perilla frutescens (perilla-mint), a species in the mint family. It is a cultivated crop in parts of Asia. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is a flower blooming now in a meadow restoration by Muhlenberg College in Lancaster Co. Park, Lancaster, PA. There are many yellow natives in bloom there now that I have been able to identify, but I haven't been able to identify this one. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear ieagleson, you have photographed Verbesina alternifolia (wingstem crownbear), a species in the aster family. It should have wing angles on the stem that descend from the leaf margins (i.e., decurrent leaf bases), which cannot be seen in your image. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Greetings, On the off-chance that you're not too busy, I give you this grass (Panicum?) growing in a disturbed area in Leicester, Massachusetts. The first picture shows the inflorescence pretty well, but the second picture showing the general gestalt is, unfortunately, a bit out of focus (note the second specimen to the left of the picture). I will collect and press the specimen this week. Thanks, as always, for your help. --Carl
    Answer
    Dear carl.moxey, the plant in your two images is a species of Echinochloa (barnyard grass), a genus related to Panicum, but with awned lemmas and obsolete ligules. There are not many species in New England, but they require close examination of the fertile lemma to distinguish. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I found this Salix on the shores of Lonesome Lake, in the White Mountains (NH). Despite your very good dichotomous key, I can't get a name on it. Thanks
    Answer
    Cedric, you've photographed Myrica gale (sweet gale), a native, wetland shrub of the babyberry family. If you bruise a leaf, you will get a distinctive, pleasant aroma. If you look with magnification, you can see resin glands on the leaf surfaces. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is this plant? Found on country road in Ohio.
    Answer
    Dear kristyicarr, you've photographed Ricinus communis (castor-bean), a member of the spurge family. The palmately lobed leaves with petioles attached to the underside (and not the edge) is one of the distinctive characteristics for this plant.
  • Question
    I am wondering if you can identify this groundcover. It is growing on top of a large boulder that was inaccessible for up close observation. The This was in a very shady situation on Cape Ann Ma, no visible flowers
    Answer
    brucepiper40, good morning. It looks to be a species of Fallopia (bindweed), a native member of the knotweed family. I can't see the stipules well in the image (as they are blurry), but what I can see suggests this is Fallopia cilinodis (fringed bindweed). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This was spotted in the woods of Vermont, what kind of plant is it?
    Answer
    Dear Nanablue. your plant is Galeopsis tetrahit (brittle-stemmed hemp-nettle), a non-native member of the mint family that is common in disturbed settings and occasionally can be found in forests. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was told this plant was sea lavender years ago, but evidently sea lavender doesn't grow here in Vermont. Can you identify it for me? It has a lot of similarities to sea lavender. It will be blooming in the fall - the bloom is purple. The photo of it flowering includes asters in the background. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear pepperbox, while Limonium carolinianum (Carolina sea-lavender) isn't known to grow wild in VT, it can be cultivated. Your plant certainly looks like this species. Feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org if you want to discuss this plant further.
  • Question
    Can you tell me which fern I have photographed? I took the pictures in a mixed hemlock forest beside a lake in the Adirondacks. Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've collected Parathelypteris novaboracensis (New York fern), a native perennial fern of (primarily) forested areas. The leallets that gradually become smaller and smaller toward the base is a good diagnostic character.
  • Question
    Please help me identify this plant from South of Barcelona, Spain.
    Answer
    Dear Maxb, I'm sorry that I cannot help you with your plant identification question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. That written, I'm happy to always try to examine any pictures you send and see if I recognize them. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This shrub appeared after I cleared trees for my garden about three years ago. On a rocky hill Mount Desert Island, Maine. Mature leaves are about 4" long and 2" wide.
    Answer
    Dear kwconch47, there are no images associated with your question. Without those, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this plant in a newly formed wetland at the mouth of 2 streams, 5 years after a storm washed the soil off the hillside to form the area. It is on a lake in NW CT. Our lake was studied by the state DEEP a few years back and found to have the most diverse collection of aquatic plants of any lake they studied.
    Answer
    Dear DRMoore, you appear to have photographed a species of Eutrochium (Joe-pye weed), native members of the Asteraceae. I can't tell which species without better images of the leaves (which are necessary for identification in this group, along with the morphology and coloration of the stem). If you can post additional images of these structures, I can try to assist you further.
  • Question
    This shrub was photographed in a theoretical 'native plant' garden near Albany NY. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, this shrub appears to be in the genus Caryopteris (bluebeard), a member of the mint family that is native to Asia. It is not native to North America. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in a roadside thicket in Jackson, NH along with feral apples. sandy loam near beavered habitat. https://goo.gl/photos/a86dCLmU2avnvuiYA
    Answer
    Dear vanwen, you have photographed Viburnum lentago (nannyberry), a native shrub/small tree of wetlands, shorelines, and (occasionally) moist uplands. It produces a dark, edible fruit later in the season that tastes similar to dates. Great images--thank you for sharing your discovery.
  • Question
    I'm trying to id this plant. I used the simple plant identifier and found that it looks similar to Veratrum Viride, but not quite like the pictures. It seems to grow alone, not in bunches, and seems to grow best in sandy, rocky soil. I've also seen it by the road at my camp growing in the gravel at the side of the road. Flowers appear only at the top of the single, main stem and form little seed pods. The plant produces only this one stem with alternating leaves.
    Answer
    Dear deborahp4, the plant you have photographed is Epipactis helleborine (helleborine orchid), a non-native orchid that grows here and there in New England. While frequent in some places, it is not invasive. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here are some pictures I've found of a purple stemmed and hairy goldenrod-seeming plant. I would love to get all the way to species. Any ideas? Thanks!
    Answer
    SunnyMona, it appears you've collected Solidago rugose (wrinkle-leaved goldenrod), a native, colonial, perennial species of open areas, wetlands, shorelines, etc. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this Salix bebbiana? Found Cooperstown, NY.
    Answer
    SunnyMona, it certainly looks like Salix bebbiana, though I can't be 100% confident because there are some species that look very similar (e.g., Salix cinerea) that need specific parts of the plants photographed to separate these two (for example, Salix cinerea has ridges on the wood of the branches beneath the bark). That written, I think you are correct.
  • Question
    Hi I would love to know what plant is this it’s growing in my front yard and I never planted it
    Answer
    Dear Migdalia86, there is no image associated with your question. Without one, I won't be able to help. If you want to attach it to an email and send it to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I will try to help you with the identification. Please be sure to include the location--this is crucial information that I need to assist you.
  • Question
    This was photographed in the Adirondacks of NY several weeks ago. Thank You,
    Answer
    Auntie, you've photographed Apocynum cannabinum (hemp dogbane). This is a native perennial that will produce a white latex when bruised like some other members of this family (e.g., other dogbane species, most milkweed species).
  • Question
    This Lobelia was found along a rocky sand spit in the Hudson in the Adirondacks of NY. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, You do have a species of Lobelia, but I can't tell you which one. It looks most like Lobelia kalmii or Lobelia spicata, but I would need to see the main stem leaves to help you further. Sorry I can't be of more assistance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Recently saw Euphorbia ipecacuanhae on flickr. I've been searching but cannot find a definitive answer to: "Is this a succulent?"
    Answer
    Dear TexasMPN47, I certainly wouldn't classify this plant as a succulent, certainly not like some well known species (e.g., stonecrop family, cactus family). While depending on the time of year, this species can have "juicy" stems, I don't consider it distinctly succulent. I hope this helps.
  • Question
    I saw this plant while walking at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge. I have not been able to ID it and there wasn't any staff available to ask. It was about 6 feet off trail growing with sarsaparilla, blue bead lily, Canada mayflower, Solomon's seal and low bush blueberry in a forested understory of mainly pines and oaks. The spathes were between one and two feet tall and the leaves were about 8 inches long (these are approximations as I didn't want to go off trail).
    Answer
    Dear Janda, you've photographed Cypripedium acaule (pink lady's-slipper). These plants are past flowering, so the bract you see would be subtending a capsule (the fruit). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Creeping Bush-clover (Lespedeza repens) This is a follow up from last Sunday. This plant is over 100 miles away from me so it took awhile to get more pictures. Most stems in bloom do not have leaves. Leaves are at the base. I have 2 pictures. One shows some leaves by the flower. The other is at the base of the plant. So, is this the correct identification?
    Answer
    Dear wdshaffer, if you notice in your photograph of the flower, there are young fruits present, made up of triangular segments that will fall apart at maturity. You have a tick-trefoil (either genus Desmodium or genus Hylodesmum). Given your comment about the stems lacking leaves, it is very likely you have Hylodesmum nudiflorum (naked tick-trefoil), a species with leafless flowering stems. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This was taken on a rocky shore of the Hudson in the Adirondacks of NY. I thought it was a Solidago, but the leaves don't really match? Thanks,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed Euthamia graminifolia (grass-leaved goldentop). It is a common, native perennial of fields, shorelines, and clearings. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This woodland plant was found in Putnam Valley, NY. No emerging flowers or seeds at this time (mid-August). Thanks for your help. Roxi
    Answer
    Dear Roxi, it appears that you may have photographed a species of shinleaf (Pyrola species), native members of the heath family. It is possible you have another species, but that is what it appears to my eye from here. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Wondering what this is, common in NY and southern Quebec hardwood forest, looks like a tree seedling but doesn't seem to get bigger. I have not seen it bloom. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear KathyMcG, you've photographed Aralia nudicaulis (wild sarsaparilla), a native perennial that has a small, woody stem that is often just below the leaf litter. From this stem, it produces a single, compound leaf and, on reproductive plants, a leafless stem that produces an array of flowers. This is a very common species in the northeast (as you noted).
  • Question
    Cook County IL Lactura Tall Lettuce update: Please see attached leaf structure pictures. Plus one image of small yellow dandeloin like flowers. You nailed it! Thanks again
    Answer
    PatrickSilady, Yes, it looks like Lactuca canadensis (tall lettuce). Thanks for supplying the additional images--that helped immensely.
  • Question
    This was spotted in Jamestown, RI Any help with the ID would be appreciated. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear NNEL, you may have Ribes lacustre, which would be quite rare in RI. This is potentially an important find (native and rare for southern New England). Would it be possible for you to correspond with me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org so we can learn about his occurrence? It would be great to get a few more images to confirm the identification (which you could send via email). Thank you.
  • Question
    I don't have any pictures unfortunately, but a question: does Solidago canadensis exhibit purple color along its stem? Not the whole stem, usually, but at some points is it common for S. canadensis to have purplish color? Or is this another species of Solidago?
    Answer
    SunnyMona, good morning. Various species of goldendrod do sometimes show purple coloration at different locations on the stem. Unfortunately, without an image, I can't help you to confirm what species you have. If you are able to acquire one, feel free to post it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Garden solutions blog cannot id this one, and neither can I. Cannot find in any guidebook. I've been frustrated by this plant for a few years. Very similar in many ways (not the flower) with sand spurrey, but it is not that. In two places by the side of the road in my locale, Harrisville NH, dry places. This flower blooms early and stays blooming into early Fall. Leaves are whole, not toothed and opposite. 5 petals, pistil hard to see, difficult because of how tiny it is. hard to photograph.
    Answer
    Dear dredfrost, your plant is Gypsophila muralis (low baby's-breath), a non-native member of the Caryophyllaceae that occurs (usually) in human-disturbed habitats, like road edges and fields. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, location: Cook County Forest Preserve Chicago IL This plant is nearly 5 feet tall, very straight up, flowered in late July as branched loose yellow cluster; flowers narrow and not very interesting and upper stem leaves are alternate pointed with margins toothed with leaf base tightly wrapped around the stem & no lobes, yet lower leaves are deeply pinnately symmetrically 5 pointed lobed and also wrapped around stem. Any idea? Thanks
    Answer
    PatrickSilady, good morning. I can't really see enough of the plant to give you a confident answer. Without the leaves/stem, it is hard to identify. The fruits and the involucral bracts do suggest this is a species of Lactuca (lettuce), such as Lactuca canadensis (tall lettuce). If you can post an image of the leaves, I should be able to give you more information. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I don't have a photo of the leaves of this flower, photographed in June and July in Harrisville, NH. I think it is growing among other plants so the surrounding leaves don't belong to it. But the flower has gone by and I'm not sure where the plant is in the jungle of green. What is it and what are the standing orange "petals"?
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, your plant looks like Trollius chinensis, a member of the crowfoot family. Members of the genus Trollius are referred to as globe-flower. The upright structures you refer to appear to be staminodes (sterile, modified stamens that often look very different from the normal, fertile stamens). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi: Ive had this plant for two-three years and not sure what it is or how I acquired. It was probably mixed in with several other plants I bought at year end discounts etc.at my local nursery. It is currently planted in a very shady area and has not bloomed as of yet (early August). Im not sure if it is supposed to bloom or whether it requires more sun. It is about 3 feet high which is about the height it grew to last year. (No bloom).
    Answer
    Dear debjoedrake@comcast.net, I'm sorry that I cannot help you with this one. I, unfortunately, do not know where this plant is growing. Location is a very important part of the identification process. I'm also not sure if this plant is cultivated or not (cultivated species can originate from very distant places, areas outside of my region of expertise). If it flowers, we can try then, as I might be able to narrow it down for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found this yesterday in western CT near Cornwall Bridge on Breadloaf Mtn. Looks like Lespedeza repens (creeping bush-clover) to me but need confirmation.
    Answer
    Dear wdshaffer, good morning. The flowers you've photographed look very much like Lespedeza repens, but I would need to see the other parts of the plant (leaves, stem) to be able to confirm the identification for you with any confidence. If you have additional images and can upload them, that would be helpful. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, there are several of this plants with spiky fruits appearing on the lawn of my house in Toronto, Ontario. They are about 4 feet tall. I wonder what it is and is it poisonous?
    Answer
    Dear Herman, good afternoon. You have photographed the fruiting plant of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). This is a native species that has follicles (the technical name for the fruit) with soft prickles on the exterior. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Does common nightshade (Solanum nigrum) have both white and purple/yellow flowers? I want to thank you all for your excellent "full" key. It doesn't keep me from consulting you, and it is a great help!
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, good afternoon. The two plants in your image are different species. The one with white flowers may be Solanum carolinense, but I can't see enough of it to determine that. The one with purple flowers is Solanum dulcamara. Solanum nigrum is a very rare introduction--most collections labeled as such are actually Solanum ptycanthum (eastern black nightshade). Feel free to email me anytime at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org if you want a longer discussion of the species involved.
  • Question
    I am confused about the field marks that distinguish Silene cucubalus from Silene latifolia. I do not find the latter in my field guides, even under the name Melandrium album. The first photo shows cucubalus (?) in Brattleboro, VT; the next three, latifolia (?) in Burlington, VT. The last photo seems to be a pink variant of the previous three, growing on the grounds of Keene State College in Keene, NH.
    Answer
    DavidBlair, good afternoon. The two are not difficult to distinguish once the characters are known. Silene latifolia has a conspicuously pubescent calyx and flowers with 5 (carpellate) or 1 (staminate) styles. Silene vulgaris (synonym: S. cucubalus) has flowers with a glabrous calyx and 3 styles. The red-flowered species may be Silene dioica (red campion), most of the other images appear to be Silene latifolia (none are Silene vulgaris). I hope this helps.
  • Question
    I've been trying to identify this plant. I think its a type of nightshade but can't find a photo that matches. It has white flowers that turn purple with yellow stamens. It stands about 18" and the baffling part is the thorns throughout. Any information will be appreciated. I am located in Saginaw MI. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear otis99, you likely have Solanum carolinense (Carolina nightshade), a species that is introduced to this part of the world. I am not familiar with all the possible nightshade species you might encounter (Go Botany is a website for plants of New England), but our floras are somewhat similar. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm in Southeast Connecticut, and I've stumbled upon this plant, which I've had absolutely no look of discovering what it is. It's underneath a tree, meaning that it doesn't get much sunlight, it's a terrestrial plant, it seems to be anomalous because nothing else around it resembles it, and while it's not directly next to the woods near us, it's near a particularly tree area. There are hairs along the stem (not evident from photos). Do you know what this is? Thanks in advance for answering.
    Answer
    Dear teenprogrammer, there is no image associated with your question. Without an image, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    I'm in Southeast Connecticut, and I've stumbled upon this plant, which I've had absolutely no look of discovering what it is. It's underneath a tree, meaning that it doesn't get much sunlight, it's a terrestrial plant, it seems to be anomalous because nothing else around it resembles it, and while it's not directly next to the woods near us, it's near a particularly tree area. There are hairs along the stem (not evident from photos). Do you know what this is? Thanks in advance for answering.
    Answer
    Dear teenprogrammer, good morning. I'm not entirely confident of the plant you have because it appears to have suffered some damage to the apical part of the stem that is making things atypical for this plant. It looks like Erechtites hieraciifolius (American burnweed), a species that normally has alternate leaves and flower heads with a conspicuous expanded base. This is a common, native weed of disturbed soils. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This flower appears to be Campanula punctata or spotted bellflower. It grows in my garden in Harrisville, NH. The Go Botany key shows it growing in NH but in no neighboring state. However, it appears also in Connecticut. Why would the range be discontinuous?
    Answer
    DavidBlair, this plant is not native to New England. Its sporadic distribution represents its random naturalizing from the garden setting to nearby landscapes. Often, species such as Campanula punctate do not have continuous distributions because they are not uniformly cultivated around the region. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Growing in Wilton, NH. A penstemon? Pardon the fuzzy photo.
    Answer
    DavidBlair, yes, it does appear you have photographed a species of Penstemon (beardtongue). I can't tell with confidence with specie you have, but it looks close to Penstemon calycosus (long-sepaled beartongue). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Township of Mamakating, NY. Uprooted from New Rochelle, NY. Gardener who introduced it to NR lot called it a Christmas Fern. I have seen similar ferns in the tropics, where they grow much longer leaves of coarser texture. They, too, reproduce by spores. This plant has done much better than in New Rochelle in this lakeside location in a hillside rock garden. I cut one spore laden leaf hoping to propagate. Instructions?
    Answer
    RoseMarieNin, good morning. Go Botany is a website dedicated for wild plants of the northeast. Cultivation is outside of the scope of topic and, perhaps more importantly, outside of my realm of expertise. That written, here are a couple of resources you might find useful for fern propagation: http://www.hardyferns.org/fern-info-propagation.php and https://www.bbg.org/gardening/article/growing_ferns_from_spores . Good luck!
  • Question
    Just wondering whether this is a native or not. it sure was popular with the bees! we used to call it agrimony, but not sure if that is correct.
    Answer
    Dear ho2cultcha, your plant is Leonurus cardiaca (motherwort), a non-native mint. It is not an invasive plant, but is capable of naturalizing to open areas and trail edges. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in Cooperstown, NY in a wetland area/former farm field. I believe it is Salix spp. but at hoping to get to species level. Young leaves and young stems have white hairs. Older/ more green leaves have white hairs restricted to the mid vein and have a slightly leathery feel.
    Answer
    Dear SunnyMona, your plant is most likely Salix discolor (pussy willow), a common native species of open areas and edges in the northeast. The leaf blade outline and the margins (mostly with irregular, blunt teeth) are good field characters for this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This fern has us flummoxed. Can you identify it?
    Answer
    Dear RoseMarieNin, I can't help you without additional information and, perhaps, a couple of better images. I don't know where in the world you are located, and this information is really crucial for plant identification. The image you've provided has the leaf at a slight angle, so I can't see it well enough. I would like to help you and try to get you an answer to your question. You are welcome to continue this discussion, if you would like, by sending an email to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and share where this fern is growing, is it wild or cultivated, and, if possible, a few more images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here is a photo of what i believe to be Asclepias purparescens [sp?]. found on the Connecticut River near my family's land. I'm not exactly sure that it isn't A. incarnata. Please let me know. thanks!
    Answer
    Dear ho2cultcha, you have photographed Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed). This species has the corona horns that exceed the hoods (in Asclepias purpurascens, the horns are +/- equal in length to the hoods), among other differences. This is a native wetland and shoreline species.
  • Question
    here are some of the best shots i got of the Jessup's Milkvetch and those strange runners. they are extremely small, so it was difficult to get a good shot. now i wish i had taken the time to investigate them more carefully. i was trying to not touch the milkvetches at all.
    Answer
    Dear ho2cultcha, as best I can tell from your image, the "runners" appear to be stolons from a species of Antennaria (pussytoes), such as Antennaria howellii subsp. petaloidea (small pussytoes), a native species known to possess elongate stolons.
  • Question
    This photo was taken on Lake Desolation, NY in the Adirondacks. I think it is a Nuphar species, but which one? Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, your plant looks like Nuphar advena (bullhead pond-lily). This is a common, native species of aquatic plant in the northeast. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I recently sent a message about a Lilium philadelphiam in North Chatham, NH. It is on private land and I will give you the precise location, if you wish, after I obtain permission from the land owner. I also found a few locations for Goodyera pubescens in the area of Keysar Lake and North Chatham. Also, some Aralia racemosa in the back of The Basin (Cold River Campground) off route 113 in the White Mountain National Forest. Thanks
    Answer
    springfieldcos, good afternoon. Thanks for sharing some of your recent finds. Goodyera pubescens in another uncommon plant that is a wonderful species to encounter. While not rare, it is infrequent enough to be remembered when seen. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I've been exploring these ledges near my family's place on the Connecticut River and i found Jessup's Milkvetch growing on them. There are other plants around them which i'd like to id as well. The first photo is a very tiny little plant which spreads around on these long runners. I thought the runners were coming from the milkvetch, but that just doesn't make sense to me, since they form little basal rosettes. The second photo might be a Maianthemum stellatum, but doesn't look quite right.
    Answer
    Dear ho2cultcha, the upright plant with flower buds is Epipactis helleborine (helleborine orchid). It is a non-native orchid that is found here and there throughout New England. As far as the runners, I cannot see them well enough in the image to help you out. If you are able to get a close-up image, I should be able to assist you.
  • Question
    I found what appears to be Asclepias purparescens along the Connecticut River near my family's land the other day, and just down the river - on my sister's land, i found these other milkweeds growing mostly in shade. The ones in the sunnier locations appeared to have all dead flowers. I know there are lots of crosses, so that might be what i have here. Down a little further there are lots of A. syriaca growing with the Joe-pyes.
    Answer
    Deear ho2cultcha, your plant here looks like Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed). This plant varies in its color, and sometimes produces purple-red petals. Asclepias purpurascens (purple milkweed) produces deep purple-red petals and hoods and has larger flowers (among other differences, such as the smooth exterior of the fruits). It would be great if you find Asclepias purpurascens because it is very rare in the northeast. Thanks for sharing your images.
  • Question
    i'm sorry to keep pestering you, but here is a salvia growing on my family's land along the connecticut river. it appears to be a Salvia of some kind, but i couldn't find this one anywhere. by the way, i answer many of the same kind of questions you get everyday, but here in California, where i now live [and have become a professional of sorts too].
    Answer
    Dear ho2cultcha, your plant is Teucrium canadense (American germander). If you look closely, you'll note that the flowers in the picture do not have a well-developed upper lip, but only a lower lip is present (the upper lip is displaced in this genus so that it appears to be two small lateral lobes, one on each side). Great photograph. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you help identify this volunteer maple (?) found in the woody part of my Lexington, MA background? Does not seem to be one of the common maples found around here. I called the file acer spicatum based on other reference books, but your site says it is very rare in S New England and your leaf pictures are quite different.
    Answer
    Dear bkatzenberg, you've photographed Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple). This is a non-native species that is occasionally observed in southern New England (and can be abundant in some locations). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Couldn't find this plant in any of our publications (even weeds?) has tough burrs around each berry, worked at Science Center gardens, herbs, pollinators in Norwell MA
    Answer
    Gardener514, you've photographed a species of Agrimonia (agrimony), members of the rose family. The burr is made up of relatively soft bristles that surround the hypanthium. I can't tell you which species you have without seeing additional images of the plant, but based on the hypanthium, you likely have Agrimonia gryposepala (common agrimony).
  • Question
    This tiny fern we found along the Hudson in the Adirondacks in NY. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, It looks like you have photographed a very small plant of Osmunda regalis (royal fern). It has all the features of this fern, but without the usual developed leaf blade with twice divided morphology. Beautiful photograph.
  • Question
    This fern was found in a boggy area beside Lake Desolation NY. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed Woodwardia virginica (Virginia chain fern). This is a wetland species with elongate indusial aligned along the midrib of the leaflet. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Trying again. Hopefully the images come through. Is this lonicera maackii? If so, any help you can give me would be appreciated. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear chorn, your plant looks like Lonicera morrowii (Morrow's honeysuckle). This species has leaves that lacks the drawn out apex as found in Lonicera maackii. Lonicera morrowii is a common, and invasive, shrub found throughout much of New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I took these photos in the pitcher plant area of Garden in the Woods on 7/28/2017. Can you confirm that this is Alisma subcordatum? Sorry the pics aren't better -- it was as close as I could get. If not, do you know what it might be? Is it too aggressive for a home pond? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Tranquill-laven02054, I can't identify which species of Alisma you have photographed without a better image of the flower, especially the petal length relative to the sepals. However, I can confirm you have collected a species of Alisma (water-plantain). If you can get another image, I may be able to help you further.
  • Question
    Your website identifies a vine growing on our field in Andover, NH as a "hedge false bindweed" (photo attached). It is identified as a NE wildflower--three types native; one type non-native. Can you ID the type? Is it invasive? I have never seen it before this year and it is spreading rapidly on our open field and climbing everything in sight. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Marinar, good afternoon. No, I cannot ID the subspecies you have in the picture without additional images and a measurement. I would need to know how long the petals are (measured accurately from their base to the apex) and I would need an image from the side view of the flower that includes the stalk to the flower. If you can give me that information, I likely can identify which type it is. Most occurrences of this species in New England are the native types. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thank you for your answer. Ilex mucronata makes sense. I don't see this shrub much. I do have a question though. The leaf margins on the shrub in the first photo I sent you are toothed. I found several other examples of I. mucronata on the property too, now that I know what it is. The purple petioles is a really helpful tip. However, on those shrubs the leaf margin is smooth (as shown in field guides and your website as well). See photos of others, same location. Sometimes they do have teeth?
    Answer
    Dear firstlight, that is a great question. The margin of this species varies considerably, though the prominence of the teeth is usually not particular great. I do find some where the teeth are quite noticeable on a few leaves of the plant, but usually they are pretty inconspicuous. The answer is, yes, this species does sometimes have marginal teeth. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Dear Botanist, I've tried to key this out but no luck. Any help IDing would be much appreciated! Disturbed ground, 3-4' tall, upright, axillary lateral branching - branching looks like spokes when seen from above. No flowers yet (late July). Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Quinn, I'm unable to tell you what species you have without any flowers or fruits. It looks like it could be a species of Symphyotrichum (American-aster), such as Symphyotrichum lateriflorum (calico American-aster), a common species that can be found in open areas disturbed by humans. As the season gets later, it should flower and you can confirm this hypothesis.
  • Question
    Hi, Is this plant Lambs Quarters? It & others like it suddenly started appearing in & around my neighborhood in Brookline MA about in mid-July. This specimen is from the curbstone area in front of our house which gets sun almost all day but no water save for the rain. It is growing in very dry soil near concrete. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear BrooklineBiker, yes, it is likely Chenopodium album (white goosefoot, sometimes called lamb's-quarters). Without fruit, there isn't a way to be completely certain, but the morphology suggests the species you believed it to be. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Can you please identify this large-leaved plant? It is a ground hugging plant, growing in an area that probably gets light no more than 1/3 of the day. It only gets water when it rains. It has been growing since mid-July near the foundation of our house in Brookline, MA. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear BrooklineBiker, you have a species of coltsfoot or sweet-coltsfoot, either in the genus Tussilago or the genus Petasites, respectively. It appears to be closest to Tussilago farfara (coltsfoot). Next year look for the flowers that emerge in the spring of the year. It will confirm which species this is.
  • Question
    Hi, What is this flower seen on July 4 in a park in West Roxbury, MA? It was spotted in a large patch of similar plants on a sunny otherwise grassy hillside. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear BrooklineBiker, thanks for the nice images. Unfortunately, this group of composites is very hard to discern without additional information. I would like to help you but will need a closer image of the involucral bracts (a side view of the flower where the bracts below the flowers can be seen clearly) and (if possible) an image of the flower head cut in half (so I can see the interior details). The first request is crucial for me to give a name with any degree of confidence.
  • Question
    I've recently moved into a home on 2 acres in Vermont and found 40-50 of this plant at the border of our yard. I am concerned that it is lonicera maackii. Can you you tell me if I am correct and if so, what is the best way to get rid of it?
    Answer
    Dear chorn, there is no image associated with your question. Unfortunately, without pictures, I can't help you. If you are having trouble posting images, please feel free to attach them to an email and end them along to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    I found this shrub/small tree in a moist woodland in Athens, Maine. I am stumped, although I feel I know what it is and am just having a numb spell.
    Answer
    Firstlight, the shrub you have photographed is likely Ilex mucronata (mountain-holly), a native species that can be relatively common in some wetlands and higher up in the mountains. The purple petioles (i.e., leaf stalks) are a good field character, as are the red fruits that will come later in the season. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Just viewed these plants in the Christian Dior Garden in Northern France. Looks like rhubarb but is more glossy and upright.
    Answer
    Dear maramoja, thank you for sharing the beautiful image. Unfortunately I can't help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern portion of North America. France is a long way from my region of expertise, as are cultivated plants. Sorry I can't be of assistance.
  • Question
    I need help in identifying this plant. The location is in the transition zone between the Hill Country and South Texas plains. It is brush country. One drop of sap from the plant can numb your tongue for several minutes. Even though the plants grow individually, they can be found in groups as seen in the first photo. I don't recall seeing any flowers or fruits on these plants.
    Answer
    Dear liveoakranch, thanks for sharing the beautiful pictures. Unfortunately, I can't help you here because Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Texas is a long way from my region of expertise. If you would like me to help find you folks in your region that can help with your questions, I can do that (just let me know at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thank you for your response. I'm sorry I did not provide the location - I've seen this tree throughout New England. The specific location of this photo is from Rhode Island in an upland location. Thank you again. Karen
    Answer
    Karen, great--thank you for getting back to me. That helps immensely. It is certainly a hickory, and would be either Carya glabra (pignut hickory) or Carya ovata (shagbark hickory). I would need to have a close, clear photograph of the leaf margin in order to separate the two on a young individual. Hopefully narrowing it down to these two species is still helpful. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here is a plant...growing on a slope going down to a stream, pushing up through some brush that had been piled on there. Wayland, MA. Thanks for your help.
    Answer
    Sheila, I don't know what species this is--it is clearly not growing as vigorous as it would like. The venation and color suggest it could be a small Symplocarpus foetidus (skunk-cabbage). Have you smelled the odor of the plant? If you bruise the leaf and get a fetid odor, it may be that native species of the arum family.
  • Question
    A photo of that fern I posted a few days badk. Here you can see the bottom of the fern better. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Sheila, without being confident, your fern appears to be a species of Dryopteris (wood fern), possibly Dryopteris intermedia (evergreen wood fern). This species is not actually evergreen, but rather wintergreen (the leaves remain green over the winter season). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I see this tree everywhere, so I know it is common in the region - located both terrestrial and near wetlands. Can you please confirm the name of this species? I appreciate your time.
    Answer
    Dear karen1619, good morning. I would like to help you, but unfortunately I don't know where "everywhere" is. It is important to supply location information because there are upwards of 500,000 species of plants in the world, and location reduces the number of possible choices down to hundreds of choices (much more manageable). It looks like a species of Carya (hickory), and if you can share the location with me, I can likely give you a more confident and more detailed answer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    After developing a poison ivy-like rash after gardening, and finding no poison ivy plants near where we were, I discovered this plant in our blueberry bush and surrounding area. It doesn't fit habitat; this very wet area as we have had a lot of rain in central Vermont, and the roof runoff is heavy here. Local landscaper was questioning whether this could-be poison sumac, and I'm curious of your thoughts. I have more photos that I can send you in a different correspondence if you need. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Mdwilliams, the plant in your photograph is a native, herbaceious perennial called Apocynum androsaemifolium (spreading dogbane). While I cannot say whether or not you are sensitive to it, I have witnessed 100s of people touching this species for making cordage without issue. Poison-sumac is a woody species with compound leaves that grows in wetlands and is usually 1-3 meters tall. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I now suspect this little guy is actually two plants, though I initially thought it was one :). I saw it last weekend, so mid-July, hiking in a wet-ish part of eastern NH in the White Mountains. I haven't been able to figure out what the dark purple, star-shaped collection of leaves (petals?) is. Hard to see from my photo, but is has a single stalk of the same color and is roughly 5" high. Thanks for any help.
    Answer
    SayVerve, the green plants below are a common, native perennial called Clintonia borealis (yellow blue-bead-lily). The species with maroon foliage is Medeola virginiana (Indian cucumber root), another native perennial. Both are members of the lily family. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I recently found a single Lilium philadelphicum in North Chatham, NH. I am wondering about the conservation status of this plant. I believe it is rare or extirpated in some of its more southern range. I will withhold the exact location for now. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear springfielddocs, Lilium philadelphicum is not rare in NH, but an uncommon species over some of the state and occasional in other regions. Lilies, like orchids, do draw a following, but are less specific about many natural history parameters, which allows them to grow in a wider variety of settings than some orchid species. If you believe these plants might be threatened by an unscrupulous collector, then it is certainly best to withhold the location. Great find and thank you for contacting me about it.
  • Question
    Recently, a large number of the plant attached below has appeared in my yard. I am sure it must be a somewhat common plant; but I've never seen it before and I haven't been able to id it. Do you know what it might be? I am not in New England. I am in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It's growing in a very sunny spot in my urban, front yard garden.
    Answer
    Dear shanc, you've photographed a species of Amaranthus (amaranth), colonizing species that do quite well in human-disturbed soils. Some are native, some are introduced from other parts of the world. I can't tell you for certain which species this is--it requires careful examination and magnification. But hopefully knowing the general group will be useful to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    please tell if this is poison, or not? also what is its name
    Answer
    Dear ernie, you've photographed a species of sumac (genus Rhus). These are not poisonous (in fact, they are edible and different species are eaten around the world). You have either pictured staghorn sumac or smooth sumac, but I can't tell without a closer picture that shows the branchlets. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this a dandelion? I've never seen one that grew so tall before. From Upstate NY USA. 7-24-17
    Answer
    Dear Confused1, your plant is a species of Sonchus (sow-thistle). Dandelion (genus Taraxacum) would not have a leafy leaf as does the plant in your images. I can't see details in the image well enough to tell you which species it is. It appears to be either Sonchus oleraceus (common sow-thistle) or Sonchus asper (spiny-leaved sow-thistle). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This was in the same area as the fox sedge, the wood fern, and the wild cucumber. On land that slopes down to a swamp and a stream...in Wayland, MA. Thanks
    Answer
    This is a non-native grass, Dactylis glomerata (orchard grass) that is very frequent in pastures, fields, and other open areas. It has closed sheaths and short, stiff branches with somewhat one-sided arrays of spikelets.
  • Question
    I know this is a bedstraw. Wondering if it is rough bedstraw. Found towards the bottom of a slope near wetlands and a stream in Wayland. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Sheila, good morning. You have photographed Galium aparine (scratch bedstraw), a native species of bedstraw that occurs in a variety of habitats. The narrow leaves in whorls of 8 (usually, sometimes only 6 per whorl) and very scabrous stems and leaves mark this species.
  • Question
    I took these photos in upstate New York. The leaves look like a Thalictrum to me, but I don't know where else to look. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, You have indeed photographed a species of Thalictrum. It appears to be Thalictrum pubescens (tall meadow-rue), a native member of the crowfoot family. You've captured a staminate specimen (i.e., one with pollen-bearing flowers). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! I tried keying out this plant in a swampy area in the Amesbury Town Forest. Can you help? Chaffee Monell
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, your plant is a small Thalictrum pubescens (tall meadow-rue), a native member of the crowfoot family. You've photographed a staminate plant (i.e., one with pollen-bearing flowers).
  • Question
    These photos were taken outside of Albany NY. I believe it is a Helianthus. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, good afternoon. Your plant may be a species of Helianthus, but I cannot tell from the images provided. There are some really technical details to distinguish Helianthus from similar-looking genera. Sorry I can't be of further help.
  • Question
    We've just started noticing this around the park in Basking Ridge NJ. We have clay soils and the area is always wet in the swamp. We suspect it is Water Hemlock but would like to have it confirmed. If it is, we need to educate the public about this plant. Will brushing up against it cause a negative reaction or just upon consumption? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear mariarossi, I cannot tell from your image what this species is (with certainly). But, if you can take a couple of additional images for me, I can help you. I need an image of the array of flowers from the side, and a clear one of the leaf segments so I can see the vein pattern. You don't need to be super concerned about this plant--it is not poisonous on contact and no one is likely going to eat some it while passing by. This species is found throughout New England near boat launches and other locations where people frequent. If you want further help, you can feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and attach images there. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, this plant is a vine like plant....growing near a stone wall close to a stream in Wayland Mass. Thanks for identifying.
    Answer
    Dear Sheila, you plant is Echinocystis lobata (wild cucumber). This is a native species that occurs in a variety of habitats. It has very characteristics fruits that are covered by prickles (you can view these online using Go Botany or your web browser).
  • Question
    Hi, this sedge was found in field...bottom of a hill heading down towards a stream in Wayland, MA. Thanks for any help you can give.
    Answer
    Dear Sheila, your sedge appears to be Carex vulpinoidea (common fox sedge). This is a common, native sedge of wetlands and low areas in fields. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Trying again...the photos did not load.. This fern, found by a stone wall that borders wetlands and a stream in Wayland. Including photos of the front and the back. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Sheila, good afternoon. I'm sorry, but I cannot see enough of this fern to identify it for you. It appears to be a species of Dryopteris (wood fern), but I would need an image of the entire leaf, including the lower leaflets, to help you out. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I came across this flower while walking in the woods behind my house (Monson, MA) and I've been unable to identify what it is. It's fairly small, maybe 4-5" height. There's an acorn near the bottom left leaf which will help with size comparison.
    Answer
    Dear Lasco, your plant is Chimaphila maculata (spotted wintergreen), a native member of the heath family. While the leaves are not actually spotted, they are striped along the veins with lighter color.
  • Question
    This square stemmed plant was found on top of a rocky outcrop overlooking Lake George NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, I cannot tell for certain what species you have. It looks very much like Origanum vulgare (wild majoram or oregano). Perhaps with that suggestion you can confirm this as a naturalized population. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is the last photo, furthest to the right, accurate for the rosette foliage of Symphyotrichum tradescantii in the GoBotany listing? Are the rosette leaves that wide? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear KateKruesi, I realize that I did not correctly interpret your question initially. The answer is no, the basal leaves you are seeing in the image likely belong to another species (like a goldenrod species). Symphyotrichum tradescantii does not have broad basal leaves. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    I found this plant growing in my wild weed yard I never water the yard it is all natural only mow it down in summer I live Yuba City, California USA. I don't know if it is a grass, weed, or tree. The photo shows it picked but the stem was longer approximately 10.5 inches coming strait out of the ground with the beautiful kind of flower top photo was taken in late June. I just loved the way it looks. I live the Northern valley flat land my house set in an old almond orchard if that helps.
    Answer
    Dear basicshari, you've phototraphed a species of Cyperus (flatsedge), which belongs to the Cyperaceae (sedge family). I can't tell you which species you've photographed as California is a long way from my region of expertise. However, I hope knowing the general group of plants may still be helpful to you.
  • Question
    Is this Monotropa Hypopitys? I've never seen it before in the Estabrook Woods, concord, MA. I thought it was Indian Pipe, but the color was wrong. It was a pale buttery yellow. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Adamsmob7, yes, as you note, the color is wrong, but so too is the flower number (note there are multiple flowers per stem, not just one). This is Hypopitys monotropa (yellow pine-sap), a species now placed in another genus from Monotropa uniflora (one-flowered Indian-pipe). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant is found in open areas; dryer sandier towns of northern Connecticut. It seems to need much sunshine. Its odd color makes it different than others that also have tiny leaves and creep along the ground. Most landscapers consider it a weed; difficult to remove, although a vinegar and soap spray tends to wither the greens. It tends to grow along the ground putting down new roots as it moves along. We cannot identify it; any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear bridgetroll, you have photographed a species of Euphorbia (spurge) that belongs to a group of plants called sandmat (formerly placed in the genus Chamaesyce). I can't tell you for certain which species (there are several in the region) without a higher quality image. It is most likely Euphorbia maculata (spotted sandmat), a very common, native species of this group in New England.
  • Question
    Greetings. I am going to ask another question about a plant for which I have only one picture taken a decade ago. I want to call it Polymnia canadensis, but, as this has not been recorded from Massachusetts, I am somewhat reluctant. This photo was taken at the end of August somewhere in Paxton, Massachusetts. (I was not as good ten years about recording exact localities. Yours truly, --Carl
    Answer
    Dear Carl, your plant is a species of Galinsoga (quickweed), species in the composite family native to South America. There are two species, which are separated on minute details that I cannot discern in the photograph. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This was found along a stream in upstate New York. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, it appears you have photographed Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed), a native wetland species with red flowers. There are two varieties of this plant, and var. incarnata has glabrous or sparsely pubescent stems (the one you've photographed), while var. pulchra has conspicuously pubescent stems. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This bush is growing right outside of the house I just purchased in Quincy, MA. I don't know if it's native to New England. I am having a hard time identifying it. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear TMichael, good morning. I'm sorry that I cannot identify the plant from the images you've provided. Some important features, like leaf arrangement, I cannot discern. If this woody plant flowers, please send me an image so that I can help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Haven't found this yet to id?
    Answer
    Dear Standal, you've photographed Agapanthus africanus or a related species (these are sometimes called lily-of-the-Nile). This species is native to the southern portion of Africa and are placed in the Amaryllidaceae. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This picture was taken near Diane's bath in North Conway NH.
    Answer
    Dear Nnel, this is Viola rotundifolia (round-leaved violet), a native species with yellow flowers that grows (most often) in forests. If you visit this location in the early half of May next year, you can view the flowers.
  • Question
    This was spotted near the Saco river in North Conway NH.
    Answer
    Dear Nnel, your plant is Actaea rubra (red baneberry), a native member of the crowfoot family. This is a native species of forests, and is more often found in relatively rich forests. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found these two beauties from my wild yard, northern MA. Who are they?
    Answer
    Dear huahsingyen, the plant with small blue flowers is likely Vicia cracca (cow vetch), a species that is found in open opens throughout much of New England. The species with dark red flowers is Lychnis coronaria (mullein lychnis), a planted species that occasionally escapes cultivation. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can't find this in my books...I think it was near a pond, but in dry area. Couldn't see leaves.
    Answer
    Dear MaryBeverly@Brook, your plant is a native, parasitic species called Aphyllon uniflorum (one-flowered broom-rape). It has been referred to as Orobanche uniflora in many manuals and guides that cover this region. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A plant can live without - one of these 1-root 2-. Shoot 3 - fruit
    Answer
    Dear Prabhattiwari, a plant can live without a fruit for some period of time, but sexual species will ultimately need to produce fruits to survive through the generations. But some species of plants never produce them and do create new offspring through other mechanisms (e.g., naked seeds, spores, bulbils, rhizome fragmentation, rooting). Also, there are species of plants that lack roots (such as some thalloid members of the Araceae), but most plants do require them. There are very few hard rules of botany when it comes to what a plant can and can't live without.
  • Question
    Hi, I just signed up for your site and then noticed that you can help identify wild New England plants. I am looking for help identifying a shrub that is growing outside of a house I just purchased in Massachusetts. Is this the right site, or is there someone else I should reach out to for help identifying a plant that may not be native to the area. Thanks! Tim
    Answer
    TMichael, good morning. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. That written, I'm happy to entertain any plant related questions, but some cultivated species may not be known to me. Feel free to post an image and I can try to get it identified for you.
  • Question
    I found the plant along the sea shore in Kennebunk Maine. It appears to be Black Mustard (Brassica nigra) but the database says it is rare so I am probably mistaken. Your thoughts appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear docj77, I can't see enough of the plants to give you a confident answer, but these individuals look like Raphanus raphanistrum (wild radish) and not Brassica nigra. Raphanus raphanistrum is quite common along the Atlantic coastline. Best wishes.
  • Question
    There are no flowers and only lateral buds on this plant I found in a wetland area in NY (but very close to Vt. Instinct says genus Swida but I was wondering if without flowers, fruit, or buds (I think herbivory took away the good ones) we could get to species? Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear SunnyMona, good morning. This is a species of Swida (dogwood), and is like Swida amomum (silky dogwood). That is a characteristic wetland species. You can confirm this by examining the pith on two-year old branches, and identifying if the pith is brown (this is the only species that regularly produces brown pith). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I could not locate this flower in my Wildflowers of ME, NH, VT book - It is growing along the foundation of my house (1 plant). It is white and about 18" tall - pic to follow
    Answer
    Dear dscheier, it looks like a white-flowered form of Malva moschata (musk mallow). An image of the leaves and a close-up image of the sepals would help to confirm this. This is an occasional non-native species that grows in fields, along roadsides, and similar open areas.
  • Question
    On a walk in Leominster State Forest today I photographed (but very poorly) a plant/flower I have never seen before. It looked like a corralbells growing on a sarsparilla. The flowers were pink fading to white, on long arching stems. Couldn't find anything in the keys on this site. Anther sighting by the water was what looked like some sort of Kusa dogwood, but not what I have in my yard. Better photo attached as well.
    Answer
    Dear DianeUP, the woody plant is Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush), a native member of the Rubiaceae that is associated with wetlands and shorelines. The pink-flowered plant is Hylodesmum glutinosum (pointed-leaved tick-trefoil), a native plant of forests and forest clearings. Best wishes.
  • Question
    It appears the uploading is having a problem - I will send the photo to ahaines[at]newwenglandwild.org , I could not locate this flower in my Wildflowers of ME, NH, VT book - It is growing along the foundation of my house (1 plant). It is white and about 18" tall - pic to follow.
    Answer
    Dear dscheier, feel free to email me at the address you noted, but with a spelling edit (ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org)--there are two "w" characters together in the address you listed, it should not be the case. I look forward to receiving your email.
  • Question
    This is a new weed that has grown up along the edges of our dirt road in the last couple of years. I am in Poland Spring, Maine. It's a vine with long tendrils and is spreading extremely fast. I wondered if it was Mile-a-Minute but the leaf shape is not right. I certainly hope it is not that, but suspect this is a non-native invasive that came in with some road fill. Sigh.
    Answer
    firstlight, the plant you have photographed is a native legume called Amphicarpaea bracteata (hog-peanut). It has aerial flowers that are open pollinated and subterranean flowers that are self-pollinated. It is capable of utilizing human-disturbed habitats. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I don't have a plant identification question,but you might be able to answer this one. I was eating cherries a while ago and I found a double cherry. This was two cherries on one stem. Each contained one seed,the seeds looked normal. What made the cherry grow double like this? I have included a picture of the double cherry beside a normal one. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear pkbeep, some botanists consider this to be a source of stress (such as high temperature or water stress). The tree produces an extra seed within one cherry so that it appears to be two cherries (this is a way to get more seeds into the environment). While a few of these is normal, many may be a sign the tree could use assistance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi -- Last week I attended the "fern walk" at Weeks State Park in Lancaster NH. Elizabeth Farnsworth, the tour leader, showed us Goldie's Fern. I found a similar fern in an area of rich mesic forest on our land where we have previously identified maidenhair fern, blue cohash and squirrel corn. Some images of the fern are uploaded below. Can you advise whether this is Goldie's Fern? Thanks in advance for your help! Best, Sandy
    Answer
    Dear 15milefalls, the fern you've collected is Athyrium angustum (narrow lady fern). Notice the elongate sori that open like a flap (rather than +/- circular sori) and narrow, dark scales on the petiole (rather than broader scales with a dark central stripe). Athyrium angustum is a common, native fern that inhabits a wide variety of moist to somewhat wet soils.
  • Question
    This mountain knapweed (that is what I believe it is) has multiplied throughout my gardens in Amherst, MA. I tried to upload the picture on the post a sighting section but the uploading just goes round and round. Is there another way I may send you this picture? Thanks you.
    Answer
    Dear Nancy, you can always send images directly to me using the email ahaines[at]newwenglandwild.org. Feel free to send me the images you are interested in having me examine and I'll try to respond promptly.
  • Question
    Hello! I found this plant in Southeastern Connecticut, in a beech-oak forest. The plant was approximately 4 inches in height. The area was just below a rock outcropping at the base of a slope. There were no other individuals in the area. My only guess would be young Taxus canadensis. Thanks the help.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, yes, I do believe you are correct. They look very much like Taxus canadensis seedlings. The pale green underside of the leaves is different than species like Tsuga canadensis (eastern hemlock), which have gray-white lines instead. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The plant in question for your second photo below is Itea virginica and it is a native species.
    Answer
    Dear nforsth312, thanks for your input. While Itea is native to North America, it is not native to New England. Here, it is a cultivated species for ornament, and not one I see planted very often (and, therefore, not one I am much familiar with). Thank you again for offering your expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I sent you pictures a few days ago of a plant I now think is an invasive garden plant, Spiraea japonica, Japanese spirea, which you have in your key, but which I didn't see because I didn't think to check the plants listed under "Woody Plants." I should always check "Woody Plants," even if the plant doesn't seem at all woody to me.
    Answer
    Dear Davidreik@comcast.net, species of Spiraea are woody, though sometimes the young plants may not seem it except near the base where there will be wood and bark. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I cannot seem to identify this plant. It was found growing along the upper portions of a stream bank near Boston. The leaves are shiny and have pink/reddish veins. Unfortunately I only took the one picture but hope it's enough. Thank you very much for any help you can provide!
    Answer
    Dear Driftwood, you've photographed the new growth of Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood), a species that is native to North America, but introduced in eastern Massachusetts.
  • Question
    Hi, I'm in the Boston area and trying to identify this plant. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear lpnewton, I would love to help you out, but my expertise is primarily for wild plants of the northeastern portion of North America (this is the main focus of the Go Botany website). Cultivated species can hail from many locations in the world and I am simply not familiar with them all. I'm sorry I can't be of more assistance with your question.
  • Question
    Greetings! This "sunflower" appeared in June/July, 2007, Southbridge, MA. Note that the stems are quite hairy, the leaves small, and the rays reflexed. Any ideas? Thanks, so much. --Carl
    Answer
    Dear carl.moxey, I can't identify your plant (yet). I'm hopeful you might be able to get some additional images for me. I need to see the flower heads (capitula) in side view and I need to know what is attached to the top of the ovary of the individual flowers that make up the flower head. Is it possible to get such images? Simply taking one of the flower heads apart and capturing a few images would help me immensely. You can post them here or email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I should be able to assist further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have another sedge that I sent pictures of in May (Concord, MA), but they were not very clear. At the time you mentioned that it might be a member of section Laxiflorae, but you needed better images. I hope these help. If not, I do have a better camera I can use. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, This plant is mature enough to propose a hypothesis about the identification, but the images are too small for me to see details. This is a good opportunity for using the better camera that you've mentioned to get higher resolution and larger images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can any let me help to find this plant name? Its from Nepal, Mid hilly region.
    Answer
    Dear sushantarl23, there is no image associated with your question. Without that, I won't be able to assist you. If you want to send the images via email, you can email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help--though please be aware that Nepal is a long way from my region of expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I have 2 more shrubs I'm hoping you can help me identify. They are in the yard of the house we bought in Worcester. The first one looks very much like the cotoneasters you help me identify, but it has thorns & the leaves are not shiny. I don't remember it have flier or berries, but I could be wrong. The second has larger, almost velvety leaves. Again, I don't remember seeing any flowers or berries. Thanks again!
    Answer
    Lisabailey, the species with spines is a type of Berberis (barberry), a member of the Berberidaceae. The species with velvety leaves looks like a species of Hydrangea (hydrangea), a member of the Hydrangeaceae. Without flowers/fruits, I won't be able to be anymore specific. I hope that is helpful.
  • Question
    hello, i found this by the ocean shore but in florida, on the gulf coast; it was in a bag for months with some sea shells; it had started to bud when i took it out a few weeks ago; can you help me identify what plant it is??...thanks, jean marie..
    Answer
    Dear jeanmarie, I'm sorry I cannot help you. Florida is a long way from my area of expertise. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I hope you are able to find an answer to your mystery. Best wishes.
  • Question
    We hiked in to view Elowah Falls on the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon on Saturday, July 1, 2017. In places we saw moss that seemed to be turning from green to blue, as in the attached photo. Can you explain? Is it possibly because of the recent extreme heat they had there? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Mikechalk, thank you for posting an image. I've never seen moss of this color before and, unfortunately, can't offer an explanation. I'm unaware of how this process would take place. I'm sorry I can't offer you any assistance with your question.
  • Question
    Hi, Can you please identify this shrub with berries growing within 10 feet of shoreline of a swampy part of Millenium Park in West Roxbury, MA on July 4? Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear BrooklineBiker, your plant is Frangula alnus (glossy-buckthorn), a species native to the Old World. Unfortunately, it is highly invasive in New England, especially in the southern part of our region. Best wishes.
  • Question
    We hiked in to view Elowah Falls on the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon on Saturday, July 1, 2017. In places we saw moss that seemed to be turning from green to blue, as in the attached photo. Can you explain? Is it possibly because of the recent extreme heat they had there? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dera Mikechalk, there is no image associated with your question. Without an image, I don't have any chance of offering you assistance with your question. If you are having trouble uploading an image, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help.
  • Question
    Hi there! Was wondering if you could identify these two plants? I'm based in London. Many thanks!
    Answer
    Dear benjaminjackw, I'm sorry I can't help you with your questions on these two plants. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. Cultivated plants hail from all over the world, some locations are very distant from my region of expertise. While I'm happy to entertain all plant-related questions, in this case I can't be of assistance.
  • Question
    Several weeks ago I sent you photos of a plant that you identified as Valerian officinalis with the caveat that it should have opposite leaves (the plant in my garden in Harrisville, NH has alternate branching). The 7' tall plant in these photos does have opposite branching and the leaves look very similar. It grows only 20' from the other "valerian". I haven't smelled the flowers or the root but will do so. Does it look like valerian to you?
    Answer
    DavidBlair, yes, that is Valeriana officinalis (common valerian). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant with 5-petaled yellow flowers grows along the Halfway House Trail on the south side of Mt. Monadnock in Jaffrey, NH. The petals are split, reminding me of a pink. The leaf (it is the lobed leaf with a spear-like point in the second photo) looks very much like that of a Prenanthes. What do you think this is? Do composites always have disc and ray flowers?
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, you have photographed Mycelis muralis (wall-lettuce), a non-native member of the Asteraceae. It is closely related to the genus Lactuca (lettuce), differing mainly in its fewer ray flowers per capitulum. And no, composites do not always have both ray and disk flowers, some have only ray flowers (like this species and dandelion), and some have only disk flowers (like Joe-pye weed, thistle, and knapweed). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Unknown plant that has appeared in flower garden in North Waltham, Mass. plants are approaching 4 feet tall.
    Answer
    Dear msprofita, your plant is a goldendrod (genus Solidago) in the section triplenervae. This group includes Solidago canadensis (Canada goldenrod) and Solidago altissima (tall goldenrod). I can't discern the two species apart with the images provided, but hopefully that will give you enough information for your purposes.
  • Question
    Hello. I am having a difficult time identifying the plant on the left in the picture I attached. I found it in Lake Winnipesaukee in NH. It covers the bottom of the lake in the shallow swimming area that ranges between 1 to 5 meters deep. The leaf blade length in the sample is about 57mm. The largest plants I saw of the same species had blade lengths of no more than 150mm. I appreciate the help. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear TimPratte, you have collected two different species of aquatic plants. The one on the left with broader leaves is Sagittaria graminea (grass-leaved arrowhead). The one on the left with narrower leaves is a species of Isoetes (quillwort, an aquatic fern ally). It is not possible for me to identify this species without viewing the megaspores found at the leaf base. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Sir can you please tell me what kind of plant is this. Thank you!
    Answer
    Aaron48, I'm sorry I cannot help you with your question. I don't know where this image was taken (location is very important for plant identification) but it appears to be somewhere far outside of my range of expertise. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. Again, I'm sorry I cannot help you--but if you let me know where you are located I may be able to find an organization near you that can help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am in ontario canada and have a ground cover I can not identify..low growing dense green mat with small blue/purple flowers
    Answer
    Dear normaholtby, the flowers belong to a species of Veronica (speedwell), based on the four petals (with the uppermost the largest) and two stamens. However, I do not know any species of speedwell with leaves of that outline. I can't help you any further with this question (unfortunately). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, can you identify these plants? My neighbors are clearing out their yard and gave them to us but we don't know what they are. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear lpnewton, without knowing what part of the world you are in, I can't help with this one. Locatin is a very important piece of information needed to identify plants. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. That written, I'm happy to entertain any plant related question--but cultivated species and plants growing outside of the northeastern United States may not be known to me. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Another plant I can't identify. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear lpnewton, this is a member of the stonecrop family (Crassulaceae), and looks like a member of the genus Hylotelephium (orpine). These are species with flat leaves and often toothed margins (members of the genus Sedum, stonecrop, have very thick, fleshy leaves without marginal teeth). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I asked you about a sedge (Concord, MA) earlier this spring when the plant was too young to identify. The flowers have changed now so I took a couple more pictures. I hope these are helpful.
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, you've photographed Carex scoparia (pointed broom sedge). This is a common, native graminoid of open habitats, often associated with human-disturbed locations.
  • Question
    I found this growing in a garden in the Helderbergs in NY. I was looking at the evening-primroses, but it doesn't seem quite right. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, You have photographed a member of the genus Oenothera (evening-primrose), but I can't see the necessary details to help you identify this plant. The four-parted stigma elevated above the anthers suggests this could be Oenothera glazioviana (garden evening-primrose).
  • Question
    This little Rose is sprouting up into our yard outside Albany NY. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, good morning. There are some details I cannot see, such has the hypanthium (the structure below the sepals on the flower), so I cannot write here with confidence. The solitary flowers, narrow stipules, and abundantly prickly stems suggests this is Rosa carolina. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I saw this plant along the streetscapes of a nearby street while out jogging and I can't seem to figure out what tree it is. I am not certaiin if you Identify trees but I first though maybe this is a zelkova. Its got brown bark with lenticles, had white flowers in the spring, and is located in zone 5. Can you confirm if this is a zelkova or if it is something else?
    Answer
    Dear breadcheesecookies, the plant you've photographed appears to be a species of Sorbus (mountain-ash) or a hybrid with this species. These are woody species found in the Rosaceae that are allied to apples. This is not a tree I recognize, but the foliage appears as I've noted. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Climbing nightshade In woodland backyard in North Waltham. Read is invasive species
    Answer
    msprofita, yes, you have photographed Solanum dulcamara (climbing nightshade), a non-native species. It is not invasive in New England. While present in a wide-variety of habitats, it does not usually grow at densities to exclude other vegetation from large areas. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The parent plant is growing in a friend's yard in western Washington State, USA, Puget Sound area.The bush grows approx 2ft tall and spreads through the root system. No flowers, and ever green. The leaves have very short hair on top and underside, and are approximately 3 x 5". The leaves are very thin, not succulent. It thrives in filtered sun, generous water,and loamy soil. We would appreciate any help you can give. No one seems to know what it is.
    Answer
    Dear C@yzie, your plant is Persicaria filiformis (a species of smartweed sometimes referred to as "jumpseed"). This member of the knotweed family is native to Asia. It is sometimes cultivated for ornament and likely how it came to be located where you found it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This was (I think) in somebody's garden, in Granby, CT, 41.92772,-72.82237 . Is it a kind of sedge? Are those flowers in the close-up? I hope I haven't worn out my welcome on Go Botany! I try to identify plants on my own before I send a question to you.
    Answer
    Dear Davidreik@comcast.net, you haven't worn out your welcome at all. Please, keep posting questions as it helps other people as well. Your plant is likely Carex lupulina (hop sedge). It has the very large inflated perigynia that you have photographed. This species is typical of shorelines and wetlands (mostly). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I have this growing in my garden in seacoast Nh, sunny and dry. I tasted the fruit last summer and it was very much like the ground cherry I have grown from seed but I wanted to check with an expert. The leaves are quite different and it didn't appear to match any species listed on your site.
    Answer
    Dear QJaus, you do have a species of Physalis (ground-cherry) in your photograph. I can't tell you which species without some measurements and an understanding of the underground organs that anchor it to the ground. However, perhaps knowing that it is a ground-cherry will suffice for your purposes. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi. I am trying to find out the name of this plant/flower. Thank you.
    Answer
    Denise, good morning. I'm sorry I cannot help you with your request. I would need to know where this plant is growing (generally speaking). There are nearly 500,000 species of plants in the world, and location helps narrow down the possible choices tremendously. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we are happy to entertain questions from outside this topic area, some species may not be known to us that are cultivated or found outside this area. Best wishes.
  • Question
    These photos were taken SW of Albany NY near a waterfall. I think there are two species of fern here. I'm not sure, since the sori do not look identical. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed two species of Dryoperis (wood fern). One of them is Dryopteris marginalis (marginal wood fern), which has sori on the margins of the leaf segments. The other I can't tell you which one because there isn't an image of the key characteristics I need (lowest leaflets). If you can get one of those images, I can help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This small pink flower was found amidst some low blueberry bushes in the woodlands of Putnam County, NY. Thank you for your help with id.
    Answer
    Dear Roxi, these appear to be discolored leaves of some species of Vaccinium (blueberry). I don't know what pathogen is causing the leaves to turn that color, but they are leaves that have been modified by some agent. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have tried several times to ID this plant with no success. All the leaves grow out of a single node but I wouldn't think they were compound. They all are on the same side of the stem...whorled? The stems and flower stalks are hairy. The plant is about 4 inches tall. I'd love to know where I'm going wrong during the ID process.
    Answer
    Dear Janda, your plant is Spergularia rubra (red sand-spurry). It is a non-native member of the Caryophyllaceae that is introduced to New England here and there in open, sandy habitats. It has opposite leaves, but also has fascicles of leaves in the leaf axils, making determining the leaf arrangement difficult (but it only shows two stipules on the stem, demonstrating the actual leaf number per node). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This Rose was found in the Helderberg Escarpment NY. I was thinking it was Rosa rubiginosa, but I have no experience with this genus. Thank you,
    Answer
    Auntie, I can't see the necessary details to make a confident determination. The pedicels and the hypanthium are not visible to me. From what I can see, the rose may be Rosa canina (dog rose), but additional images of the features I mentioned and careful examination of the leaf surface to check for the presence of glands would help me considerably. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This Rosa was also found in the Helderberg Escarpment NY. Can you tell me which species it is? Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, your rose appears to be Rosa multiflora (rambler rose), a non-native species that is quite widespread in the northeastern United States. The exserted styles and fimbriate stipules are good field markers for this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good morning! Morgan, Vermont (extreme northeast, Canadian border) Forest floor, lots of conifers but not found specifically under conifer June 8, 2017 Thank you for help!
    Answer
    Dear meeyauw@gmail.com, your plant is Eurybia macrophylla (large-leaved wood-aster), a native member of the Asteraceae. It forms extensive colonies of heart-shaped basal leaves and will produce an aerial stem with showy flower heads later in the growing season.
  • Question
    Discovered this plant under a mature hemlock very near the water on Lake Winnipesaukee in Alton, NH, this weekend. Tried Newcomb and the GB database but can't seem to nail it. Any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear Coniferboy, your plant is Diervilla lonicera (bush-honeysuckle). It is a native member of the Caprifoliaceae that is found in a wide variety of habitats and even asides high into the mountains in some areas of New England.
  • Question
    Saponaria officinalis? The leaves are paired, opposite, simple margins.
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, your plant is not Saponaria officinalis, that species has a very different inflorescence (in terms of congestion, pedicel lengths, etc.). It is a member of the Caryophyllaceae, but without seeing the leaves and a habit shot of the plant, I can't confidently identify it. If you can supply some additional images (and the location of the plant), I would enjoy helping you.
  • Question
    This plant is on Prudence Island, RI in the sandy shore area. It is blooming now (June) and is about 3' diameter and 2' in height. Can you identify it please? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear mgirard4, your plant is Glacium flavum (yellow horn-poppy), a non-native member of the Papaveraceae that is found here and there along the coastal plain in southern New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this plant on the upper beach by the mouth of the Merrimack River on Plum Island. It has the look of a nightshade, indeed very like a plant which was a nightshade on the beach near St. Augustine, FL.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, I can't be 100% certain, but it looks like a seedling of Xanthium (cocklebur), a member of the Asteraceae. If you look in the upper right portion of the image, you can see one of the capitula (burrs) of this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was wondering what species of Veronica and Achillea would be the northeast natives that I could plant in a garden? It seems V. americana is associated with very wet conditions (correct) and that would not be suitable. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear mhughes30@cox.net, Great question. The Achillea is easiest. Our widespread yarrow that is seen in fields and along roadsides is a native species (Achillea millefolium subsp. lanulosa). As for the species of Veronica, that would do well in a garden (i.e., are not wetland species)--this is a little harder. Most of our native species are wetland plants. Both Veronica peregrina subsp. peregrina and Veronica serpyllifolia subsp. humifusa are both native, upland species of speedwell. Care must be taken because each of these species has another subspecies found in the northeast that is non-native (i.e., you must acquire the exact subspecies that I've listed here). If you need clarification on anything, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can discuss further.
  • Question
    Here are the photos of what I think might be Dutchmans Pipe. Sorry they didn't upload with my original post.
    Answer
    Dear mjfoley, this looks like Isotrema tomentosum (woolly Dutchman’s pipe), often referred to as Aristolochia tomentosa in older literature. It is a liana (i.e., climbing/trailing woody plant) that is often planted for ornament. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am in dire trouble identifying this ground cover / maybe small shrub. It has all the characteristics of a juniper variety, common green carpet in particular, what exactly is it? The star flowers are hard to match with my resourses. It smells like cypress on the tips of needle growth only. Found growing out of a coastal rock in northern territory Australia in full sun, there are a lot of these around the edges of the beach, half are yellowing or already shed completly, but this one is in bloo
    Answer
    Dear sylviasharee, I'm sorry that I cannot help with you plant. Australia is a long way from my region of expertise (northeastern United States). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of this region. If you need help finding someone closer to your area who could potentially help you, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can send some contact information your way. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This crawler with waxy thick three set spear leaves and assymetrical flowers found on an island on the equator above australia. Vey hot beach, no rainfall for three weeks we are in dry season, but this is juicy and flourishing. So many buds waiting to flower, at first i thought it was a morning glory, but the leaves spear out, and this flower is weird. What is it? The engine searches and plant identifier apps have limited data or maybe I am not explaining the characteristics properly.
    Answer
    Dear sylviasharee, I'm sorry that I cannot help with you plant. Australia is a long way from my region of expertise (northeastern United States). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of this region. If you need help finding someone closer to your area who could potentially help you, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can send some contact information your way. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Do you have any idea what this is? (It was found in Cassadaga, NY (a rural farm community)). My mother bought her childhood farm and the tenant farmer didn't care for the land well. These things have spread EVERYWHERE! I don't know what they are. The top is pictured below. They look like carrots. The are rampant--roots connecting them and then more carrots--If left alone they appear to become stiff like tree stumps.... They don't flower. The carrots pic here are small.
    Answer
    Dear klabby, the plant and roots look like Phytolacca americana (American pokeweed). This is a well-known, native weed of cultivated areas. If you let it flower/fruit, you will be able to confirm the identification through comparison of images on the web. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This member of Apiaceae grows in a garden in Harrisville, NH. It's about 3' high, the stalk is green (no purple mottling), round and slightly ridged. It has a large compound leaf (alternate branching) and an umbel of 5-petaled very small flowers at the top.
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, aside from the leaf arrangement you mention, this plant looks like Valeriana officinalis (common valerian). The inflorescence branching is not an umbel, but rather a cyme (which also fits for Valeriana). You should smell a rank odor with the open flowers or with the roots. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this red mulberry? Found in my yard, on slope after had landscapers clear,away trees,and overgrowth, in South Windsor, CT.
    Answer
    Dear JPFitsgerald, good morning. You plant is a species of Morus (mulberry), but it is more likely Morus alba (white mulberry), which commonly escapes in New England. The leaf blades of this species would not be rough-hairy on the upper surface of the blade. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good evening & thank you for helping me previously identify several plants. I have another one. Could this be Joe Pye Weed? I'm not sure, but are the leaves too wide to be this plant? No blossoms yet.
    Answer
    Dear Lisabailey, Your plant appears to be Perilla frutescens (perilla-mint), a member of the Lamiaceae. It is commonly cultivated and sometimes escapes in New England.
  • Question
    Needed know what this was
    Answer
    Dear Amandahipiechild29, I would like to help you but I need more information. is this plant wild or cultivated? What is the habitat it is growing in? Very importantly, what part of the world is this plant growing in? The image is a little bit blurry, any chance you have additional images that are more clear? If you are willing to provide this information I am happy to try to help you identify this unknown plant. You can always email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org to continue this conversation. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good afternoon! This shrub was growing in open water in NH. The water level is thought to fluctuate. Thanks in advance!
    Answer
    Dear KDC, good morning. Your plant is Myrica gale (sweet gale), a native shrub with aromatic leaves related to (but in a different genus from) bayberry. The pollen cones (present in one of your images) are preformed (i.e., formed the summer before) like some members of the birch family.
  • Question
    I have a very aggressive vine growing in my yard (in RI) that I think is Dutchmans Pipe. I've been told that this plant is an important source for for Swallowtail butterflies. Can you confirm if this is Dutchmans Pipe and how I can try to manage it? It's taking over!
    Answer
    Dear mjfoley, I can't help you confirm the identification of the vine/liana because there is no image attached to your post. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help identify your mystery plant.
  • Question
    What are these purple flowers? They grow everywhere. They may have originally been a garden plant, but I didn't plant them!
    Answer
    Dear teepee12, the plant you have photographed is Glechoma hederacea (Gill-over-the-ground), a common lawn and yard plant is the northeastern United States. It is a member of the Lamiaceae (mint family).
  • Question
    One more "what is it" flower. I didn't plant it, but it doesn't look wild to me. These are very small, about the size of a violet, but sturdier. We are in south central Massachusetts -- the Blackstone River valley.
    Answer
    Der teepee12, your plant is likely Veronica chamaedrys (germander speedwell), a non-native herbaceous plant that is naturalized here and there in New England. I can't observe all of the features necessary to make a confident identification, but the flowers are typical of this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    So I've been cleaning some side brush in my yard, trying to get rid of some invasive species taking over. This plant popped up, as I started opening it up to sun, I believe it is a smilax lasioneura but I don't believe they are native to Maine, although I doubt somebody would've planted it. What is this plant? Thank you in advance
    Answer
    Dear nikkigreen, there are no images associated with your question. Without those I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you further.
  • Question
    I realize this isn't a gardening website, but I am in search of some sort of perennial plant that spreads. Specifically, I'm trying to find something (other than grass of course) that is capable of quickly crowding out weeds so they don't grow. The weeds I'm dealing with have huge taproot systems and they are quite troublesome and no fun at all to dig out. I was going to try creeping thyme but I'm not sure about it. Do you you know of something that could help?
    Answer
    Dear Kaimarag93, it is difficult to suggest the appropriate plants without knowing what part of the world you live in and what the site conditions are like. For many sites in New England, the following native plants can be used to cover areas and keep the non-native species back a bit: Anemone canadensis, Dennstaedtia punctilobula, Podophyllum peltatum, Rhus typhina, Asclepias syriaca, Eurybia divaricata, Eragrostis spectabilis, Solidago canadensis, Solidago rugose, Rudbeckia hirta, Onoclea sensibilis, and Matteuccia struthiopteris. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this in my backyard in Rhode Island and I believe it is curly dock. Can you confirm?
    Answer
    Dear jphonor, unfortunately, I can't confirm this for you. There are 18 species of dock in New England and I need a habit shot (the entire plant) and the mature fruit (your plant isn't quite ready yet) to be able to tell you the species name with confidence. That all written, your plant is likely Rumex crispus (curly dock). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant was at my new home in Dekalb Illinois when I moved in. We have a creek running through our back yard. There are several of them, so I am guessing that they spread?? Can you help me identify it please? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Pwelland, thank you for posting the image, but I'm unable to tell you what the species is without flowers and/or fruits. You are located far enough away from my region of expertise that I will need the reproductive parts of this plant to help you. If you can get additional images when it flowers, I will try to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    If you get two questions about this plant, please forgive me. This was taken near Albany NY in July. I thought it was Cowbane (Oxypolis rigidior) but I can't find it on your site. Do you have an ID for me? Thanks,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you plant is Valeriana officinalis (common valerian), a non-native member of the Caprifoliaceae. It will have rank smelling flowers and roots. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The last couple of years I've noticed what appear to be mutant flowers on Black Huckleberry at Quincy Bog Natural Area in Rumney, NH. The plants have plenty of healthy/normal looking flowers, but then I see something like the attached flower. Does someone there have an explanation for this?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, I do not know for sure what is causing the unusual flowers. There is a fungus that infects this and a related genus (Exobasidium vacinii) that may be causing the flowers you are viewing. Thanks for posting the image.
  • Question
    Eric Larson of the Marsh Botanic Garden at Yale identifies this as Liquidambar styraciflua 'Rotundiloba" - the seedless sweet gum!
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, it may well be that species--if this person is knowledgeable in cultivated plants you should go with that source. This website and my expertise are restricted to wild plants of the northeastern United States. I cannot see the images clearly enough to identify leaf arrangement. Thanks for sharing your results. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi-I have this flower which looks like a violet of some sort but I've never been able to identify it. I live in central vermont, and it's only found in this one little cluster in my lawn. Dry area in the grass, Colonizes a bit every year, starts blooming late May, I'm in zone 4-5.
    Answer
    Dear Lscharf1, you have photographed Mazus miquelii (creeping mazus), a non-native member of the Phrymaceae. I would be interested in learning if these were planted (to your knowledge) and how "manicured" the lawn is. You can (if you would like) email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org to reply. This species has not been observed in VT before outside of cultivation. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I'm wondering about the difference between Viburnum oculos and trilobum? I realize that I may of never taken enough notes/photographs of the following species to identify it properly. It was located along the edge of a freshwater marsh in Southwestern, NB.
    Answer
    Dear Danielle88, there are no images attached to your question here, so I won't be able to help you with the identification of a certain plant. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help you. These are all one species, distinguished as two subspecies: one native to Europe (subsp. opulus) and one native to North America (subsp. trilobum). They are only distinguished with confidence by the morphology of the petiole glands (see the distinguishing features listed on the Go Botany website).
  • Question
    A friend told me this giant beautiful bush in yard was poison oak or sumac. I live in Delaware but I'm guessing you can identify it -- hoping so! I live a mile from the Delaware River. Our area gets flooded often. I'm doing a 100-day art project (photos/sketches) on Instagram to learn the plants in my neighborhood but this one has stumped me. I'm so glad I found your site. I'll be posting the link on social media and sending it to all the friends I've bugged about this plant. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear jazztizz, your plant looks like a species of Ampelopsis (peppervine). In our part of the world, Amur peppervine (Ampelopsis glandulosa) is the most common species with lobed leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in Midwestern USA, this is growing next to my house among a huge clump of nasty weeds. Doest appear to be a displeasing plant so I was thinking about transplanting. Can you identify this, and is it a weed or wildflower or something else?
    Answer
    Dear Kaimarag93, Your plant is Securigia varia (crown-vetch, also known as Coronilla varia in some manuals). It is native to Europe and is widely planted to stabilize soils and prevent erosion.
  • Question
    This is a shrub which is floppy and maybe around 4 feet high in Maynard MA in a dry area in full sun. It was recently under a Norway Maple which was removed recently. There smaller plants that are spring up nearby. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear carolynn, the shrub you have pictured looks to be a species of Swida (dogwood). The apically dilated style suggests this is Swida amomomum (silky dogwood). This species usually has brown pith on the two-year-old branches (as a way of confirming this hypothesis). I am assuming this is a wild plant that was not planted in a cultural setting. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I identified the flower on the left as Centaurea montana (Bachelors-button) several years ago but now am not so sure. The flower on the right is surely Centaurea montana, and they look very different. The individual flowers looks more like those of a blue "ragged-robin".
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, those are two different species. The first (more compact) image may be Centaurea cyanus (garden knapweed, sometimes called bachelor's-buttons). The second image is likely Centaurea montana (mountain knapweed), but I can't see the involucral bracts around the base of the flowers to help you know that with confidence. If you can take a side-view image I can assist you more.
  • Question
    Sweet-William catchfly (Silene or Atocion armeria) ? The Peterson guide mentions "black sticky zones" on the stem of the Sleepy catchfly. I zoomed in on the first photo and see those zones and even what looks like a fly stuck to one - just above the center of the photo. The pink flowers grow above a basal rosette; leaves are opposite; found in New Haven, CT. PS The bachelor's button flowers just posted grow in Harrisville, NH (first) and in an "urban pasture" at Yale, New Haven, CT.
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, your plant does look like Atocion armeria (sweet-William-catchfly). The particular shade of red in the flowers, short pedicels, and the glabrous calyx are some of the features that help identify this species.
  • Question
    This tree, perhaps an exotic, grows in the Marsh Botanic Garden of Yale University. The leaf suggests maple but the branching is definitely alternate. It is not a tulip tree. What is it?
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, good morning. I can't identify your tree with confidence because this individual could come from anywhere in the world, long distances from my region of expertise. That written, it looks like Acer campestre (hedge maple), a species that is naturalized in some parts of New England (i.e., has escaped cultivation). You might examine some web images of that species to see if you believe it fits your tree of question here.
  • Question
    As a land trust biologist, I was asked to identify the attached flower. The observer states that it is about the size of a dime, and that no vegetation was apparent. The flower was found between a barn and house in Denmark, ME. Thanks in advance for the ID!
    Answer
    Dear PMiller, I would like to help you but without any images of the leaves or the general habit of the plant, I'm unable to assist you. With such an image, I can't identify the leaf type, arrangement, or margin (for examples). Is it possible to get additional images of the plant? If so, you can post them here or email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help you with your identification question.
  • Question
    This was found in the Helderberg Escarpment near Albany NY. I'm wondering if it is another example of a Christmas Fern. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, yes, your plant is another individual of Polystichum acrostichoides (Christmas fern). Your have photographed the reproductive leaflets near the apex of the leaf blade.
  • Question
    This tiny succulent plant was found in the Helderberg Escarpment, NY. Since it doesn't have a flower at this time I haven't been able to find it. I thought you might have better luck. (i.e. more experience) Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, your plant looks like Sedum sarmentosum (stringy stonecrop), one of the few species of stonecrop in the eastern US with whorled leaves. It will have yellow flowers when it matures if this hypothesis is correct.
  • Question
    This is planted in a tiny flower circle in central Connecticut. Please help identify. Many stalks/stems together, 18-24" tall. No flowers just yet? June 8, 2017. Hope it is a flowering plant? It's in a shaded side yard, but doesn't mean it was properly planted. I can tell they are there deliberately, because they only fill half of the circle. The roots grow sideways in the dirt. Help pls. I'm desperate (I have to keep tags on my plants, whereas previous owners did not leave info.) Thx.
    Answer
    Dear Dnv373, your plant may be Artemisia vulgaris (common wormwood), a member of the aster family. If you look on the undersurface of the leaves, you should see gray-white hairs that discolor the lower surface. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in a cow pasture in Edgartown. Siliques up to two cm long with two rows of seeds. Plants up to about 3' tall. Stems with very fine pubescence. Tap root.
    Answer
    Dear gregorypalermo, Your plant is likely Descurainia sophia (fine-leaved tansy-mustard), a species with finely divided leaves as you have photographed. This species is known from human-disturbed habitats here and there throughout New England.
  • Question
    Hello, I'm wondering if this is Mirianthemum trifollium? I discovered it while exploring a disturbed bog (powerlines, all-terrain vehicle paths) in southwestern, Nova Scotia. Thank you.
    Answer
    Danielle88, yes, your plant is Maianthemum trifolium (three-leaved false Solomon's-seal). It is a characteristic plant of peatlands and swamps with an organic soil horizon. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant has come up along with many poppies I started from a bag of mixed poppy seeds in my garden in Indianapolis. It is now over five feet tall and blocking the view to the rest of the poppies. I'm hoping it might be a prickly poppy, but when answering the plant identifier questions I came up with a field sow thistle. Neither plants' stock pictures seem quite right. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Pull it or leave it?
    Answer
    Dear Sdixon00, your plant is likely Lactuca serriola (prickly lettuce), a wild plant that can be found in human-disturbed habitats. It will exude a white latex from any wounds that are made. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The photo that you identified as Nabalus reminds me of this, taken a month ago in Antrim, NH, just as the first herbs were emerging to carpet the woods. Is it also Nabalus?
    Answer
    DavidBlair, yes, those leaves also belong to a member of the genus Nabalus (rattlesnake-root). The white latex that will exude from a small tear in the leaf will help you confirm these when they are small. Best wishes.
  • Question
    These two photos were taken 13 seconds apart in mid June, in Peterborough, NH. Is there a spiraea with this maple-like leaf? (clearer in second photo)
    Answer
    DavidBlair, your plant is likely a cultivar of Physocarpus opulifolius (ninebark), a member of the Rosaceae that is related to Spiraea (meadowsweet). While native at the western edge of New England, this plant is cultivated throughout the region.
  • Question
    a small group of us amateurs were in the woods north of Boston with our ID books, but were unable to do much with these two. The first one looks like sassafras except that this part of a small group of herbaceous plants, no higher than this one whorl. The second one appears to be suffering, but in my mind, maybe its bloodroot. Hope they look familiar to you. - Bruce
    Answer
    Dear brucepiper40, both of the leaves are the same genus (believe it or not)--Nabalus (rattlesnake-root). They can even be the same species, but we would need flowers/fruits to tell you which species. If you tear a small portion of this leaf, you will note a white latex will exude from the wound (helping you to confirm this genus). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This shrub was near Hinesburg VT. I thought it was a Viburnum, but after checking the photos of each species I'm confused. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, good morning. Your shrub is a species of Swida (dogwood). Note the arcuate veins on the leaf blades. I can't tell you which species of Swida you have without a few additional photographs (or pieces of information), such as the leaf arrangement, the color of the 2nd-year branches, and a close-up of the flowers. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I found these proliferating in a meadowy area of what was once a farm (now a park) in southeastern Connecticut in mid-May. I have not had much luck identifying them. They look like a vetch, but I've never seen any vetch this wacky-looking before.
    Answer
    TheBrassGlass, good afternoon. There are no photographs associated with your question. If you are having a difficult time posting questions, please feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    I am still trying to identify the many species around our southern NH home. The white trumpet-clusters(they're 3-4" long) seem to be on a vine. The small clustered white flowers are popping up in a damp bed abutting a low area. And the 3rd is in a flower bed but can't figure out what it is. The leaves are ominous. I can't imagine what the large buds will become.
    Answer
    Dear nancyQ, I'm not sure I can help you with these species because they are cultivated (or at least that is my assumption based on you noting the "damp bed"). The first species with larger white flowers appears to be something in the Caprifoliaceae (honeysuckle family), the second with the flower bud is unknown to me, the last appears to be Maianthemum canadense (Canada-mayflower). Sorry I cannot be more helpful, but cultivated plants are another realm of expertise from wild plants. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Anyone know what this plant is or is it a weed. It appears every year and I usually pull it out thinking it's a weed.
    Answer
    Dear marcolfifi, I can't help with you with confidence because I don't know what part of the world your plant is originating from. Location is a very important part of the identification process because it narrows down the possible choices of what can be found in a certain place. Your plant looks like Phytolacca Americana (American pokeweed), which would have white flowers and dark purple fruits later in the summer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. I encountered this small, but striking flower in West Newbury yesterday. It was growing roadside on the edge of a meadow in a partially wooded area. Also blooming in the same area were Wild Geraniums and Dame's Rocket. The plant was about 1.5' tall with opposite, lanceolate leaves at about 5" intervals along the stem with about a 30 degree rotation of each pair. The way each petal was divided was particularly striking.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, your plant is Lychnis flos-cuculi (ragged robin lychis), a non-native plant of low meadows, shorelines, and ditches. It can be quite abundant in some locations in New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. I just moved into a new home in Colorado (elevation 5,000 ft). There is a small area of these plants in my backyard. They are positioned in a more shady area underneath some small trees. I am really hoping that this is not poison ivy. Please help me identify these. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear bostonz6, Your plant is likely Aegopodium podagraria (bishop's goutweed), a non-native member of the Apiaceae (celery family) that is commonly planted near homes. It is not Toxicodendron (poison-ivy), so you can be comfortable with whatever you decide to do with this plant (keep or remove). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was told this is a Ornamental Mulberry, but I can't find any information on line. It's about 6' tall. I am in Northwest Ohio
    Answer
    Dear Peacockmoon, your plant is not a species of mulberry (genus Morus), a plant that has very different flowers (without showy petals) and different leaves that are not nearly as cleft. I've shared your image with the staff to see if someone does recognize this plant. If anyone recognizes it, I'll send you an email. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am having trouble identifying this plant. It's located in lower michigan and in a wooded area. Help?
    Answer
    Deear Katcas09, you've photographed a species of Galium (bedstraw). I can't see the number of leaves per whorl well enough to tell if this is Galium aparine (scratch bedstraw) or Galium triflorum (fragrant bedstraw). If you are able to get clear images of the leaves at some nodes, I could help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I've discovered a shrub at Quincy Bog Natural Area in Rumney, NH that I can't identify. Leaves are alternating, shiny, and lanceolate. Flowers are small, white, and trumpet shaped and the flowers appear in threes with the flower stalks dropped over the leaf axil. 2 photos are attached.
    Answer
    Dear gdewold, your plant is Elaeaganus umbellata (autumn-olive). If you examine it closely, you will see silver scales on the underside of the leaf that create the shiny aspect of the leaves.
  • Question
    Yes, sorry I didn't include the location as it was clearly required. This is the first time I've seen this plant and was very surprised at the size of it, with it being at least 2 feet tall. It was located in Southern Ontario along the Niagara Escarpment in a open area. I thought it was comfrey. The stems are very hairy and angular.
    Answer
    Dear janforster, thanks for the location information. Your plant is likely Symphytum officinale (common comfrey). It has ridges of thin green tissue down the stems from the leaf bases that help to identify this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Mystery plant on the Satchel Moll power dam trail, between posts two and three. Location: http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=19/41.77521/-72.90697 . Angelica atropurpurea, purple-stemmed angelica, great angelica?
    Answer
    Dear davidreik@comcast.net, you do appear to have Angelica atropurpurea. Beautiful photographs, thank you for sharing them.
  • Question
    can you tell me the name of this plant please
    Answer
    Dear deb123, you appear to have photographed a species of cactus, but I don't know what part of the world you are living in. Location is very important and helps narrow down the choices of possible identifications. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we are happy to entertain any plant related questions, plants from distant regions may be outside of our expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm having trouble finding resources on this apiaceae. It has taken over a lot of my yard this spring (in so. NH). Too early to see any type of flowers, but is clearly parsley family. It doesn't show any of the danger signs i.e. no purple at all and has hairs you can see 10ft away. looks to be basal at the moment I see no branching. The stalks have a curious open "C " shape, all along them. like a very thin celery. If this is a Q.A.Lace, then they have the biggest taproot I've ever seen on them
    Answer
    Dear lordarchery, I can't identify this plant with 100% confidence from the images attached, but you do appear to have photographed Daucus carota (wild carrot). The pale taproot you photographed can be bruised and it will yield a distinctive carrot odor if this hypothesis is correct. Daucus carota is a common weed of early successional habitats and would be expected to be found in a tilled garden setting. When flowers/fruits appear, we can confirm this if you would like.
  • Question
    I'm trying to idntify this plant that appeared in one of my raised beds that I grew some veggies and herbs in last year in MA.
    Answer
    Dear Janis, your plant looks like Artemisia vulgaris (common wormword), an aromatic species (when the leaves are crushed) that is common to disturbed soils. The undersides of the leaves should be very pale with gray-white hairs (I simply cannot see this feature in the photograph you've taken). You can confirm the identification by looking for those pale undersurfaces of the leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi my name is Christine and over a few years now i have found a small flower - pant under my apple tree. It is just a light green stem, with a cluster of red/orange berries in a lollypop shape. would you contact me. Thanks in advance. Christine. wolvesinthepark@aol.com
    Answer
    Dear kris42, I can't help you with your image. I don't know where in the world this photograph was taken, and location information is critical for plant identification. It is possible these are the fruits of a species of Arisaema (Jack-in-the-pulpit), but you would have seen leaves associated with it prior to this time. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I believe this is a sedge. It is a prolific volunteer in my yard and I enjoy its filling in where i have removed grass. I would like to know what it is. Thank you. Concord, MA
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, Your sedge (genus Carex) in the image is mature enough to supply a hypothesis about its identification, but the image is not close enough for me to see the details I require to help you. It looks like a member of section Laxiflorae, but I'll need better images to help you.
  • Question
    I have another sedge, just one individual, in another part of my yard where I believe the soil is not very good. I am interested to know which one it is. If better pictures of specific aspects of these 2 sedges would help, please let me know. Concord, MA
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, I can't help you with this sedge identification at the moment because the plant is still quite immature. I would like to help, but will need images of the plant when the perigynia (fruiting structures and associated bracts) are well formed. If you are able to get an image of the plant intact and some of the flowers/fruits taken apart on a sheet of paper (or some flat surface) that would be useful to me. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The pictured fern was found in a damp woodland near a seasonal stream, near Albany NY. I am also wondering if I could be seeing both Phegopteris species (P. hexagonoptera and P. connectillis) in the same general area? Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you fern is Polysticum achrostichoides (Christmas fern), a species that is very common in forests, especially on rocky slopes. Yes, the two Phegopteris species can grow in close proximity to each other. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This bright orange flower has popped up this year growing amidst a grassy field in Concord, MA. I'm guessing its a non-native species. It looks a a bit like a wild mustard. The plant has alternate leaves on a stem that ends in a stalk with multiple small flowers with 4 petals (each petal just under 1cm in length). Thank you : ) I'm having trouble uploading images and will email
    Answer
    Dear pguiney, there are no images uploading for your question. If you are having trouble uploading them, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you.
  • Question
    I think this Hudsonia from a fire lane in the Manuel Correllus State Forest on Martha's Vineyard is H. ericoides. The pedicels are up to 6 mm long. The leaves are up to 4 mm long. Is the pubescence of the leaves abundant enough to make one consider the possibility of Hudsonia x spectabilis? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear gregorypalermo, given the length of the pedicels, your plant is likely Hudsonia ericoides. The hybrid would have shorter pedicels based on the contribution from Hudsonia tomentosa.
  • Question
    Hi there! I'm new in the area and was intrigued by these plants. Would you mind identifying them? Many many thanks in advance!
    Answer
    Mountaindreams, Unfortunately, I'm not sure what area you are referring to that you are new in. Location is a really important piece of information for plant identification. I will do my best to examine your images, but without knowing where in the world they were photographed, it is likely I will not be able to identify some of them. 1. a species of crustose lichen. 2. Trillium undulatum (painted wakerobin). 3. possibly a species of Prunus (plum/cherry). 4. A species of Amelanchier (shadbush), likely Amelanchier bartramiana (mountain shadbush). 5. a species of Abies (fir). 6. A species of Sphagnum (peat moss). 7. Trillium erectum (red wakerobin). 8. Viburnum lantanoides (hobblebush).
  • Question
    I have seen this plant on our property in Cabot, Vermont and have been unsuccessful in identifying it. I see it in a small stream, as well as in a wetland area. I've seen it in the same area as Marsh Marigold. The plant seems to have basal leaves and one stalk with multiple flowers. Can you help identify this? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear radirlam, there is no image associated with your question. Without that it will be very difficult for me to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you with your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This tiny flower is growing in several places in our wet yard near Albany NY Thank You, Ruth
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, your plant looks like Veronica serpyllifolia (thyme-leaved speedwell). This is a common member of the genus that is found in human-disturbed habitats.
  • Question
    May I send a photo of a plant/tree that is spreading all over my property? I'd like to get rid of it but the root system is endless & annoying. Thank you😃
    Answer
    Dear Karen, if you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I'll try to help you out. Please be sure to include location information. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Last message locked up on me. I have this plant that comes back every year...same spot..not sure what it is. Could you help identify? Not sure if it is a weed or what? Thanks..Mark
    Answer
    Dear tke735, without knowing where this image was taken, I'm unable to help you. There are upwards of 500,000 species of plants in the world (far too many for anyone to know or remember), and location helps to narrow down the possible choices to sort through. If you are able to grab an image of the plant in flower (it looks like its starting to bud now), I can help you or direct you to someone in your part of the world who can. Best wishes!
  • Question
    In my planter, I sowed Sweet William seeds..but this is what came up? Doesn't look like the seedling pictures I have seen on line? Did I waste my time? Should I start over, cause I am not sure what this is. Thanks again, Mark
    Answer
    Dear tke735, those seedlings are definitely something other than a species of Dianthus (the genus Sweet William belongs to). It might be interesting to allow them to grow up and identify what they are, but that will be up to you. If you decide to let them grow, send me another photograph and I'll try to help you with you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Most of our phlox leaves have a distinctive marginal vein and grow in opposite sets of two. Each set is rotated 90 degrees from its neighbors above and below on the stem (decussate). Recently I observed what looks like the identical plant growing in the same group, but with three leaves per node instead of two. These sets of three are also rotated relative to each other, but by 60 degrees. I also have one plant with single leaves arranged alternately. Is this common? Mark M, Singers Glen, VA
    Answer
    Dear mminton, good afternoon. You are photographing more than one species of plant. Note that in your first image the species has whorled leaves with three leaves at each node. IN the other images where leaf arrangement can be observed, the leaves are alternate (only one leaf per node), though the leaves are crowded so that they superficially look as if they are whorled. You will find that when these species flower, they will be different and I can help you more then. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I'm in SE Mass. Swansea. My first query is about the tree in bloom. Birds love the red berries in fall. The other tree has very few leaves, very old. Not sure if it's native.
    Answer
    Dear Butterfly, the shrub with white flowers is Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle), a non-native shrub that can be very invasive in regions of North America. It is unfortunate because it is very beautiful. I can't help you with the tree because the photograph is too far away. If you can take a close-up of the leaves, bark, etc., I may be able to help you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I was hoping to get a more positive ID on a plant I've seen growing in patches throughout the woods, south of Concord, NH. I've always been lead to believe it is pipsissewa. Just found a patch in a deeply wooded area along the Merrimack river. I found that most descriptions online don't match up 100%. Not much teeth on the sides of the leaves and a purple-red on their undersides. Are there any look-a-likes I should know about?
    Answer
    Dear lordarchery, your plant is Chimaphila maculata (spotted prince's-pine), a relative of the more common Chimaphila umbellata (noble prince's-pine, also called pipsissewa). This plant is relatively common in southern New England but becomes uncommon and rare as one moves north into ME and NH. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Having a problem identifying this plant. Can anyone help?
    Answer
    Dear janforster4@gmail.com, I can help you, but only a little. If I knew where this plant was growing (i.e., what part of the world), I could do a better job for you because location is vitally important. You have photographed a species of Symphytum (comfrey), a member of the borage family. If you share with me where this image was taken, I may be able to determine which species of comfrey you have photographed.
  • Question
    I've found this plant in growing in quite a shady part of my garden, it looks familiar but I can't work out what it is using some online tools, any clues would be great as I do like the look of it.
    Answer
    Dear rych1981, good morning. I'm sorry I'm unable to help you with your plant identification question. Location is very important information for identification because there are nearly 500,000 species of plants in the world and we narrow down the choices by using the area the plant comes from (a given region may only have a couple of thousand species, depending on the size of the region in question). If you can provide the location, I may be able to help or at least direct you to a place that can answer your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Sir,, Please identify to that plant It is grown in village /mountain
    Answer
    Dear Surrender, good morning. I don't know where this image was taken so I'm unable to help you fully. Location of the plant in question (country, region, state) is vitally important for the identification process. The image looks like a species of Phytolacca (pokeweed), but I can go no further without location information. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good evening. I'm hoping you can identify this shrub (there are 5 total) in the yard of a house in Worcester that we are rehabbing. The shrubs are about 4 feet tall, but could get taller. I have been trimming them. The flowers are small. The leaves are at most an inch long. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Lisabailey, your plant looks like a species of Cotoneaster (a woody member of the rose family). Specifically, it looks like Cotoneaster lucidus (hedge cotoneaster), which is native to Asia. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The garden patch outside our house in a very wooded edge of Amherst, MA is often overtaken by mostly presumably native plants. I've been trying to leave as much as I can around our vegetable plots, especially if they'll flower and be beneficial to pollinators. I'm familiar with the morning glory vines and the wood sorrel, but I can't identify the lacy-leafed things here. It's quick-growing and familiar but I didn't introduce it. What is it? Will it flower?
    Answer
    Dear Jone, the plant you have photographed is Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed). It is weed native to North America but highly maligned by the public for its allergenic pollen. It will flower, though the flowers are not as conspicuous as many member of the aster family (to which this species belongs).
  • Question
    So I believe I have a pink shell azalea here in Maine. I'm not quite sure though. I have uploaded two images I took a few years ago but I could take a couple more of the foliage right now as the blooms just died off. What do you think? Seems sort of rare I read. Thank you for your input, Nikki Green
    Answer
    Dear nikkigreen, good morning. Your shrub does look like Rhododendron vaseyi (pink shell azalea). The spots on the petals and +/- 7 stamens per flower mark this species. This plant rarely spreads outside of the cultivation and is rare as a naturalized species on the landscape (though as a planted species it is not uncommon to see). Thanks for sharing the images, beautiful indeed.
  • Question
    Hi, I have what I believe to be a mockernut hickory, judging by the bark, nuts, and flowers that are similar to https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/carya/tomentosa/. After the flowers drop on the ground in the spring, I rake them up and put them in my yard waste bin. Would it be OK for me to compost them instead, and if I do, will they provide more carbon or nitrogen to my mix? Thanks in advance.
    Answer
    sc20d, I'm the wrong person to ask about composting because I compost everything (e.g., bones, animal hides, shellfish shells, nut shells). I use very large bins and allow them to decompose over several to many years. I also live remotely and don't need to worry about pets getting into the compost (though wild animals sometimes do). Everything breaks down with enough time and I simply have the space to give things time. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here is a somewhat closer shot of the plant below to confirm whether it is Anemone canadensis.
    Answer
    Dear sroshongf, Yes, this closer image does help suggest these plants are Anemone canadensis. Thank you for the bigger image!
  • Question
    This plant is growing next to my friend's barn in southeastern Pennsylvania. While her pig was alive this plant was always just part of her chow. Now that it's finally in bloom we are having trouble finding out what it is.
    Answer
    Dear sroshongf, your plant looks like Anemone canadensis (Canada windflower). I would need a close-up image of the flower to be 100% confident. If you want to upload one, I would be able to confirm this. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Looking for ID on this weed that showed up at house foundation. Upstate NY. Lots of fields surrounding us.
    Answer
    Dear jojimurph, your plant is in the genus Tragopogon (goat's-beard), a member of the Asteraceae. There are a few species found in the northeast, and I would need to see the open flower to help you know which one you have photographed with any confidence. If you can upload one with an open flower when they expand, I can help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I live in Columbia County, NY which borders western MA. I've run across this perennial in a disturbed area that I'm clearing of invasives (Norway maples, garlic mustard, etc.). Can you tell me what this might be? At first, I thought it was wild geranium which is also nearby.
    Answer
    Dear calexander23, your plant in the photographs looks like Anemone canadensis (Canada windflower), a member of the crowfoot family. This is a native plant that has a relatively northern distribution in (primarily) the northeastern portion of North America, becoming rare in the southern Appalachians. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I am a newbie to this site... I saw this plant along with several others in a garden in Aberporth, Ceredigion, West Wales and hope that someone may be able to identify it. The house is very close to the sea but sheltered from it by other houses. Height wise they are about 15 feet tall and have small purple flowers. Many thanks in advance Whatif
    Answer
    Dear Whatif, your plant is Echium pininana (giant viper's-bugloss), a member of the borage family native to the Canary Islands. It is well-known for its cultivation in the British Isles. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. I found this plant in the Hellcat Area on Plum Island, MA. It looks like Canada Rockcress, and the distribution map indicates it's in the area. The green seed pods have a strong mustardlike taste; however, other plants looks quite similar, and I would like confirmation. Plum Island being a barrier island with a sandy substrate, the habitat didn't seem to match.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, your plant appears to be Turritis glabra (tower-mustard). This is a non-native mustard that is found here and there in New England in disturbed locations and clearings. Best wishes.
  • Question
    yes i would like to know what type of plant this is in nevada
    Answer
    Dear deb123, I'm sorry I cannot help you with your request. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. The cactus you have photographed grows far outside of my region of expertise. If you need local assistance, I can direct you to an institution closer to your home. Just let me know if that would be of interest to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found these little beauties in an area with very dry shade under a dogwood tree in my backyard in Worcester. Initially I thought they were violets, but I don't believe they are - they have 6 petals and are bell-shaped. Are you able to identify these for me? Please and thank you. Denise
    Answer
    Dear dhmcginley, your plant looks like a species of Hyacinthoides (bluebell). The flowers do not go with the leaves (the leaves are a separate plant from the flowering stalk). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is there a way to tell how old a lilac copse is? Since pruning recommendations are to remove entire stems, the true age of the plant would be only seen in the roots, right? I've read that lilacs were often brought from Europe and popular planted in gardens in the 18th century - I have a well established (and in need of pruning) stretch of both purple and white lilac along the stone wall along the road in from of a 325+ year old house in E.MA... Would love to know if the lilac are just as old!
    Answer
    Kamereone, there really isn't a good way without knowing the site history. Even cutting some of the older stems to count growth rings wouldn't work well because some of the original stems may have died (even though the plant itself has been living for perhaps centuries). Looking into the original homestead construction may provide one of the best clues for your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thanks for the ID of Morrow's Honeysuckle! It seems the "foreign" species have more open and upward flowers compared to the native ones - is that a valid way to distinguish them? I've read the non-natives also have hollow stems? I ask because I'm trying to identify what to protect/keep in an upcoming anti-buckthorn-swallowort-bittersweet effort, and I'm worried about mistaken identity! (Photo: Is this another Morrow's? Pink flowers)
    Answer
    Dera Kamereone, Lonicera morrowii and its hybrids do have hollow stems. The pink flowers are often the hybrid between Lonicera morrowii and Lonicera tatarica (called Lonicera X bella). Our two native species of honeysuckles found in forested habitats have solid stems. Good luck!
  • Question
    Hello, ace botanists! My name is Carson. I live in Bath, Maine, not far from a wetland area. Much of the soil in the area is heavy with clay. I've been seeing a couple plants like this one in my neighborhood. This particular one is located on a roadside. I thought it might be some variety of packera, but I'm not very good at telling! Any help you could provide would be excellent.
    Answer
    Dear cistulli, you have photographed Barbarea vulgaris (garden yellow-rocket), a non-native mustard that colonizes disturbed areas like fields, gardens, and roadsides. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Grass like plant growing along small stream Williston, VT June 14th. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear joshl, it appears you have photographed a species of Schoenoplectus ("leafless bulrush"). It is mostly like Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani (soft-stem bulrush). There are two other species found in VT, but they are less common. If you examine the inner stem and the air-spaces, you can identify the species (see the dichotomous key for details).
  • Question
    Taken July 6, 2013 along a road in eastern Tennessee. Stachys palustris?
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, these photographs look like Clinopodium vulgare (wild basil). Stachys palustris would have a more elongate (i.e., taller) inflorescence with a different corolla. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Yes this large shrub/young tree is growing in a young hardwoods on a slight slope off the end of a field. It is located in western NY. If you need more information please ask and a bunch of us here are dying to know what it is, since we have checked numerous resources to no avail. Thank You Dave
    Answer
    Dear Dave, you have photographed a species of Carya (hickory), a native tree in the walnut family. I can't tell you which species without additional and up-close photographs of various parts of this plant. Perhaps knowing the genus is enough to get you started on your study.
  • Question
    In southern NH, we have a load of this ground-bound vine on a steep slope that doesn't get too much sun. I can't figure out what it is. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear nancyQ, your plant is Rubus hispidus (bristly blackberry), a native, trailing blackberry with very thin, bristle-like prickles. It can tolerate sun or shade and will form colonies of intertwined stems. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in Sudbury, MA along southern edge of primarily coniferous woodline; photo taken on May 18th. Photo shows fresh white and spent yellowed flowers. Bush habit, textured bark, some specimens peeling. Flowers are in pairs and have separate ovaries. Full key seems to indicate this is a honeysuckle (a term that triggers a knee-jerk reaction "Ahhh! Invasive! Kill it!") and I was surprised to learn there are native species! Am I fortunate to have one, or is it pitchfork time?
    Answer
    Dear Kamereone, good morning. I understand the "kneejerk reaction" you spoke of, but these are really important to avoid. Entire lakes of native aquatic plants have been removed because someone assumed the species in question was non-native and invasive. Also, important to point out the non-native species did not travel to this continent of their own will with an evil agenda, but are the result of global travel for trade, resource extraction, etc. (i.e., all things we have created and continue to foster). That all written, I do understand the drastic modification to natural communities that occur with the invasion of some non-native species. I only mean to suggest that any hatred we have for this situation should be directed to where the blame actually lies (us). Your plant is Lonicera morrowii (Morrow's honeysuckle), a non-native species that was first introduced to MA for horticulture (it is from Asia). It can be very invasive. The native species of honeysuckle have very different flowers (examine web images of Lonicera canadensis and Lonicera villosa for comparison).
  • Question
    If this image loads I would love an ifentification. Grows abundantly in Nashua, NH in a mostly pine, oak, maple, viburnum woods in filtered light.
    Answer
    Dear Mtbf, there is no image associated with your post. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to send them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you further.
  • Question
    Thank you for your recent id's. They are really helping me identify what I have in my yard. Here is a volunteer fern in my back yard I'm not sure off. Concord, MA
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, you are most welcome. The fern you have photographed is Pteridium aquilinum (bracken fern). This is native to North America, though different subspecies are found throughout the world.
  • Question
    Here is tree sapling volunteering in my back yard (Concord, MA). It seems to be some kind of elm. I believe I see the same tree popping all over roadsides in Concord. Is there a way to tell what species it is?
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, your plant is a species of Ulmus (elm). It is likely to be Ulmus americana (American elm), but mature foliage would be needed (or images of the fruits) to confirm this with confidence. Best wishes.
  • Question
    And here is another tree sapling that has volunteered itself in a few spots in my backyard. It's leaves and stems are sticky and aromatic. My best guess was Black Walnut. Concord, MA. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, yes, they do appear to be a species of Juglans (walnut). I would not be able to tell you for certain which species of walnut without additional information, but hopefully knowing the genus will get you started with your study of this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this a bulblet on the Bublet Fragile Fern (Cystopteris bulbifera) from near Albany NY? Thanks,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, it does appear one is beginning to grow. Cystopteris bulbifera would also have abundant stipitate glands on the plant (which you should be able to see at this point). That is one way to help confirm the identification.
  • Question
    This Geranium was found blooming near the Thatcher Park Nature Ctr. Helderbergs NY I can't figure out which species.
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, I can't answer your question without additional details. I would need to know the size of the flowers (best referenced through measuring the length of the petals). Also, I would need to know if there were stipitate glands on the stalks to the flowers and the sepals (which I can't see in the image). The color of the flower and orientation of the flowers suggests Geranium pretense (meadow crane's-bill), but the other details I mentioned here are necessary to confirm the identification.
  • Question
    Can you identify whether an endemic tree species is endangered based on population density alone?
    Answer
    Dear kakuchi, there is no image associated with your question. Without an image, I'm unable to help you. Please keep in mind that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (i.e., northeastern United States). While I'm happy to entertain questions from outside of this area, I may not be familiar with the species in question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, Yesterday, May 22, I saw many of these plants growing in the Maine woods in the Moosehead Lake area. The leaves are hairy. It was not in flower. It was in an area that has been used for many years as a fishing and sporting camp. Can you tell me what it is? Thanks, Marty
    Answer
    Dear Marty, you've photographed a plant called Hieracium maculatum (spotted hawkweed). It is a species native to Europe that is introduced to several New England states, including ME. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Recently moved to a property in North Andover, MA that hadn't been cared for for several years. Trying to identify this (coniferous?) tree and a vine growing nearby. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear Nfriel, good afternoon. I can't see enough details of the first plant (you referred to it as a vine) to provide an identification. If you can take additional images and get closer photographs, I may be able to help. The tree is a member of the Cupressaceae (cypress family). Several genera within this family are referred to as cedars, including members of the genera Thuja, Chamaecyparis, and Juniperus. If you could provide images of the seed cones, I could help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is a sapling of some kind of tree. These or similar pop up around my yard every year. Concord, MA, suburban yard near wooded area.
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, you appear to have photographed a species of Malus (apple). Various flowering crab apples have this leaf morphology. I can't tell you which species you have without flower and fruits. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi I have a roughly 8 inch tree seedling I'm trying to identify. Pictures attached. thank you! Concord, MA backyard near a wooded area (mostly oaks).
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, your plant is a seedling of a Tilia (linden) species. There are several non-native lindens that originate from Europe, one common species is Tilia cordata (small-leaved linden). It would be hard to know for sure which species it is without flowers/fruits. Hopefully knowing the genus of the woody plant will help you with your study.
  • Question
    Tried to upload photos but not sure it worked.
    Answer
    Dear Sheilanagigue17, if you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hi I''m new to the area and I found this in Pepperell, MA. Near the Nashua River but located in my yard that backs up to some woods.
    Answer
    Dear sburke01, you likely have photographed Turritis glabra (tower-mustard). It has foliage and flower buds much like you have photographed. If correct, you should observe pale yellow flowers when the flower buds open (sometimes very pale yellow, almost white). If not, take an image of the flowers and post them so I can try to assist you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant was found in a damp woods near Delmar NY. I wondered about Lepidium species, but it doesn't seem to match. Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, your plant looks like Lepidium campestre (field pepperweed). The small white flowers with auriculate-clasping leaves are good field marks for this mustard. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this on a small rocky rise in The Helderberg Escarpment NY. I think I've narrowed it down to a Polypodium species. Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you have photographed a species of Polypodium (polypody), just as you thought. Based on the leaf blade outline and tips of the leaf lobes, it is most likely Polypodium virgnianum (rock polypody). This is a common, native species of fern.
  • Question
    This fern was found on a rocky outcrop near Delmar NY. I thought that it looked like a fern I sent to you last week, that you suggested was a Cystopteris bulbifera. I do not see the bulblets on the underside of the leaf, although I checked several fronds. Would you always expect to see a bulblet on a frond in C. bulbifera? Or is there another ID for this? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, the bulblets form a bit later after the leaves emerge. In other words, you should see them eventually on the leaf blades. If you don't later in the summer, it is doubtful the ferns were Cystopteris bulbifera. If you can get an image of the underside of the leaf to show the sori, it would be very helpful to confirm the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this plant is growing in a landscape bed that used to be full of pachysandra. The pachysandra mysteriously died last summer, and now I have four of these plants in the bed. I have no idea what they are or how they got there. I am in Westchester County, NY (not exactly New England, but just a stone's throw from CT). Many thanks in advance.
    Answer
    Dear cfullan, you have a basal rosette of Verbascum thapsus (common mullein). This is a common, weedy species of human-disturbed habitats. It is a biennial and will flower, fruit, and then senesce in its second year of life.
  • Question
    Any idea what this plant is?
    Answer
    Dear jasbflower, I am unable to tell you what your plant is. Location is a really important piece of information. There are upwards of 500,000 plant species on the planet, but learning the location removes many of the choices that are possible (e.g., the state of Maine only has 2100 species of plants). Please keep in mind that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. If you can supply additional information about the plant, I may be able to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant, photographed in November of 2013, had few leaves left. Those I do see do not appear to have toothed margins, therefore Clematis virginiana seems unlikely. Thank you for your thoughts!
    Answer
    DavidBlair, you have photographed Clematis occidentalis. The fruits are quite diagnostic of this species. the leaf blade margins of this species are variable. It may be difficult to detect the coarse, few teeth when they are dried up. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant grows along School Street in Concord, NH. It was in bloom this past week. It resembles Philadelphus inodorus. However, most but not all flowers seem to have 5 petals. And P. inodorus is not supposed to occur in NH.
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, I'm not sure what species you have found. Planted shrubs could originate from many parts of the world--far outside my region of expertise. If you want to send me some more images of the leaves so that I can see the details of their margins, arrangement, etc., I may be able to track down an answer for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Ah, spring in New England, such a wonderful time. My query is about this plant: it is a shrub, about 2 m tall at this point growing in my yard in Southbridge, MA; photos taken within the past day or so. I have, hopefully, attached a picture of the flowers and leaves, and of a cross-section of the stem. Thanks, as ever, --Carl
    Answer
    Dear carl.moxey, Your plant is Elaeagnus umbellata (autumn-olive). It is a non-native shrub that has escaped to much of New England. You will notice silver scales on the leaf blades (especially the undersurface). The flowers will be very fragrant, and will mature into red drupes (fleshy fruit with a single seed inside).
  • Question
    I recently moved to southern NH. I'm attempting to identify the huge variety of flora on our property. Here are two pics. One is what I believe is a blackberry species - it has 3 leaves & during winter, they're bare arched branches. They're planted on woods' edge facing/stretching eastward. Amongst those plants, see 2nd pic, I've circled an emerging plant - the stem is very different. Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear nancyQ, you have definitely photographed a member of the genus Rubus (blackberry, raspberry). Without seeing the underside of the leaves, it is hard to know who you have. The highly glaucous stems (i.e., with a whitish bloom) suggest Rubus occidentalis (black raspberry). If you can provide images of the leaf undersurface, I can help confirm the identification.
  • Question
    We've been noticing these popping up around our home! We like them. It don't know what they are! And want to know if they're poisonous please help! We're located in Oregon
    Answer
    Dear Graylilly, your plant is Euphorbia lathyris (gopher spurge), a non-native herbaceous species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was sure this was Lonicera canadensis but now wonder if it is L. villosa. Found on one of our brooks and a piece taken to another brook, where we now have 5 plants (they did that all on their own). May 14, 2017 Barton, VT (northeast VT) Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear meeyauw@gmail.com, your plant is Lonicera canadensis. Lonicera villosa has united ovaries and lacks the short nectar spur shown in your images. Wonderful plant--thank you for sharing your images.
  • Question
    We bought a house in Worcester that we have been rehabbing. The yard was a mess & we are slowly reviving it, trying to use only approximately native plantings. We have many plants that have popped up in a dry area between our driveway & street. Can you help me identify so I know whether they should stay or go? I think they had a yellow flower on them last year. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Lisabailey, I cannot tell what your species of plant is for certain without a closer image of the leaf and the stem. It much like Erigeron canadensis (Canada fleabane), a weedy species native to North America. If you can provide another image or two closer to the plant, I should be able to confirm this hypothesis for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was wondering what this flower is, someone told me it was poisonous? Found on side of road in Grafton MA
    Answer
    Dear WendyFord, you've photographed a species of Narcissus (daffodil). There are many cultivars of white daffodils and I don't know which one (exactly) you have photographed. However, I hope knowing the genus will provide you a starting place on your study of these plants. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Ground Ivy (Glechoma hederacea)? Growing in Benton Point State Park, RI near path.
    Answer
    Dear joshl, your plant is Lamium purpureum (red henbit), a non-native member of the mint family. This genus differs from Glechoma in its sessile (i.e., unstalked) flowers. Those of Glechoma have short pedicels.
  • Question
    Campanula patula? Newport RI growing to the side of a path at Benton Point State Park
    Answer
    Dear joshl, You appear to have photographed a member of the genus Hyacinthoides (bluebells), a member of the Hyacinthaceae. These are species native primarily to Europe and northern Africa. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I believe this is a skullcap (Scutellaria). It was growing in Pennsylvania in a garden, so may be neither New England nor wild. Do you know the species?
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, skullcaps have a transverse ridge on the calyx (the sepals of a given flower taken collectively). This plant lacks the characteristic ridge of Scutellaria. I don't know this cultivated species, but I can share that it does not appear to be a skullcap. Best wishes.
  • Question
    i have a plant that is really trying to takeover my wild flowers. Ill describe it at the young stage say 12-18" has a purple stem not hollow and rounded. leaves are alternate and about 6" long with single vein the length,and almost like short points on edges 1/2" apart.looks like they get lobed when they get larger. no separation between leaf and stem
    Answer
    Dear Plantbo, I'm sorry I can't help you. You are outside of my range of expertise (northeastern United States and adjacent Canada) and I would need an image of the flowers to assist you further. If you are able to catch this plant in flower and send in some images, I will likely be able to assist you with your question.
  • Question
    Seen in Worcester, MA. Woody-tree but cannot tell what the species is... please help!
    Answer
    Dear astahovec, your plant is a species of Quercus (oak) that has expanding leaves. It is a member of the black oak group (e.g., northern red oak, black oak, scarlet oak), as evidenced by the bristle-tips at the apex of the lobes. If you can get more images or images when the leaves expand, I can help you further with the identification.
  • Question
    Hi, Here are some photos of a plant growing next to my house. They are in rocky soil next to a stone foundation. The pictures were taken this week. Can you identify the plant? Is it hawkweed? Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Brookline Biker, the plant you have photographed looks like Lactuca serriola (prickly lettuce). The line of rigid bristles up the midvein of the leaf (underside) is diagnostic. You have also photographed Alliaria petiolate (garlic-mustard), the one with small, white, four-petaled flowers. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello I found this plant in my woods behind my yard in Massachusetts. Can you let me know what it is? 😁
    Answer
    Dear Sorgenman, your plant is Glechoma hederacea (Gill-over-the-ground or ground-ivy), a non-native member of the mint family that is very frequent on lawns around New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this plant is growing in our garden in rural Royalston, Massachusetts (North Central MA) and we haven't been able to ID it to determine if it's a weed we should try to control. It was one of the first plants to begin growing in the early spring. We haven't seen any flowers on it yet. The leaf in the photo is 2" from tip to base. Thank you for any advice! Lydia
    Answer
    Dear lydiamusco, good morning. Your plant is Rumex acetosella (sheep sorrel, a species of dock). It is a sour-tasting plant that can grown abundantly in disturbed soils but is not invasive. Some people enjoy using this plant as a food or medicine. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have been trying to figure out what this is. I really want some in my yard.
    Answer
    Dear Bad97, you have photographed Piers japonica (Japanese Andromeda), a member of the heath family that is native to eastern Asia. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! I am new to CT (New England in general) and am super excited about discovering all the plants around. I recently came across what I believe is a Black Huckleberry (Gaylussacia baccata). I would love to eat their berries when they start becoming ripe. Never had a huckleberry before! My question is, are there any look-a-like plants I should be concerned about? I want to be sure I am eating the berries of a huckleberry and not something potentially toxic. Picture attached. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear csrain, yes, you have photographed Gaylusaccia baccata. The entire leaves with resin dots (use magnification) on both sides of the leaf blades and black fruits without bloom that are sweet tasting are good identifying characteristics. Enjoy them later in the growing season!
  • Question
    Good day! I'm Stumped! This is flowering now (05-14) in Northeastern Vermont. It's roadside....Leaves look like rhubarb...it's growing in a large patch that is often damp to wet with run-off, and then dries out. I just found your site, so if you need more info lmk and I will go back and get better details.... Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Streakdog, you have photographed Petasites hybridus (butterbur sweet-coltsfoot). This is a non-native member of the Asteraceae that has been introduced to a few locations in New England. A beautiful plant, but it can be invasive in open areas.
  • Question
    Several of these growths were seen growing on a Juniper in a brushy field near Rutland VT. We cut it in half and there was a hard center reminding us of a 'gall', but the tentacles were very gelatinous. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, this is a fungal pathogen of eastern red cedar called cedar-apple rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae). It forms these distinctive growths on the branches of Juniperus virginiana that you have photographed. Thanks for sharing.
  • Question
    This photo was taken May 4, 2013 somewhere in the Monadnock Region of New Hampshire. The pink flowers each have four petals and bloom in a cluster. The leaf at the base of each flower stalk seems to clasp the stalk. The stem of the plant is hairy.
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, you have photographed Lunaria annua (honesty), a non-native member of the Brassicaceae. This plant is best known for its distinctive fruit, which you can observe using a web-based image search or check out images on Go Botany. Best wishes.
  • Question
    It is a fungi. Kindly tell me its name. I'm from Goa,India Thank you
    Answer
    Dear feltan29, good morning. I'm not able to help you with your question because there is no image associated with your question. Without an image, I cannot offer you any suggestions on the identification. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants (not fungi) of northeastern North America. That written, there is a chance I might recognize the fungus you are interested in (at least to the family or genus). If you want to send the images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I would be will to take a look (though I may not be able to offer any confident identifications). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Does PlantShare data (photos and locations) get used by invasive species tracking projects, such as PLANTS/EDDMaps/Outsmart?
    Answer
    Dear Kamereone, good morning. No, this data is not formerly shared or used by other programs. While it can be used, especially those sightings that have images to voucher the species being tracked, it is not currently. Because Plant Share is interested in all plants, those wishing to use the data for any research would need to filter through to remove both native and non-native, non-invasive species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have thought that New England Violet 2017 Lee NH DSCN2973.png is just the Viola nephrophylla. (Larger image) We have a lot of them in the back yard this time of year. Our yard is on the edge of a forest. But New England Violet 2017 Lee NH DSCN2980.png (first one uploaded, smaller image) seems to have pointier leaves than I am used to seeing. I'm just a guy with a back yard, not a botany person.
    Answer
    Dear Ninetrees, good morning. Your plant is Viola sagitatta var. ovata (synonym: Viola fimbriatula), a common violet of dry to moist soils that flowers this time of year. This species will have leaf blades that have a relative length to width ratio longer than Viola novae-angliae once they have expanded a bit more. Notice also these leaf blades are truncate at the base (not cordate). Beautiful photographs, by the way.
  • Question
    Hi, I have been trying to identify a low-growing wet area woodland plant from a remote area of Wiscasset, Maine, for almost a year. I've had no luck and many hours involved. It has very dark green variegated leaves and I think multiplies through rhizomes. How do I upload a photo? Can I just email one to you? I've thoroughly searched the key with no luck. Thanks, L
    Answer
    Isandrei, Yes, you can simply email me photographs to the address ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can assist you with your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, The attached photos are of plants in a forest Brookline, MA. I took the photos on May 6, 2017. The area where the plants are growing is partly shaded. The soil looks rocky. Thanks!
    Answer
    BrooklineBiker, I'm sorry, there is no image attached to your question. Without that, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to send them by email to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help you with your question.
  • Question
    Hi, I'm resubmitting this question because I'm not sure it went through to you. I took pictures of this flower in a forest in Brookline, MA on May 6, 2017. The area where the plants are growing is partly shaded & the soil seems pretty rocky. A meadow is about 50 feet away. What did I find? Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear BrooklineBiker, yes, I saw this question and answered it (sorry you did not get notification of the answer). The plant is Rhodotypos scandens (black jetbead), a non-native member of the rose family. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Several of these ferns were growing on a path near a creek in Troy NY. I'm wondering if it could be a Athyrium species? Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, Given the winter green leaves that are lying around the base of the plant and the dense tufts of white-brown scales at the base of the petiole, your plant is Dryopteris marginalis (marginal wood fern), a common species of rocky forests in the northeastern United States.
  • Question
    I think I see this plant frequently in the spring in moist places. Maybe it grows up into something that I could identify. I'll upload some pictures from today in Hebron, CT. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear davidreik@comcast.net, you have photographed the basal leaves of a species of Nabalus (rattlesnake-root), native members of the sunflower family that were once placed in the genus Prenanthes. These will flower later in the growing season and have small flower heads (relative to species like American-asters and sunflowers). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Last summer I purchased and planted a bunch of different split plants from a local gardener here in St. Charles, IL. I had them marked, however - the markers did not weather the winter :( Can you please help me identify this plant? I am not sure if it is something I planted or, if it is an invasive weed. Thank you!! Sincerely, Lisa H.
    Answer
    Dear lisahoof, I can't be sure what species you have by these photographs. Some plants are very distinctive without flowers or fruits, but others require these structures for identification. They remind me of Circaea canadensis (broad-leaved enchanter's-nightshade), a native member of the Onagraceae (evening-primrose family). While I can't be confident, you will know soon as they should start to send up flower buds shortly. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am looking for the best way to increase my knowledge about invasive weeds. On-line class? Feild class, Mass Audobon Society?? I started renting Goats in Central Mass and I need to have a knowledge base to Identify poison plants for the goats. Along with knowledge of non-native invasive Plants. Thank You, Tammy Hebert Central Mass Goat Rental
    Answer
    Dear Tammy, good morning. The New England Wild Flower Society does offer classes in many topics, including some on non-native plants from time to time. If you view the schedule of programs (http://www.newenglandwild.org/learn/our-programs), you can find lots of classes where plants are discussed in the field and in the classroom, and discussions of native vs. non-native species are frequent topics in classes. Good luck.
  • Question
    I found this white trillium with green petals and red in center next to some Trillium Erectus. This white/green flower doesn't fit descriptions or photos of other trilliums. Would you please confirm its identify. Location: Henniker, NH. PS - recently attended Ted Elliman's talk at Fox State Forest in Hillsboro NH and bought his great book (Wildflowers of New England Elliman & NEWFS) which doesn't include this particular trillium. Thanks for your input!
    Answer
    Dear gchohen, there is no image associated with this question. Without an image, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, please feel free to email them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you further.
  • Question
    Hi, The attached photos are of plants in my yard in Brookline, MA. I took the photos on May 6, 2017. The area where the plants are growing is unshaded. The plants are growing next to my house which has a stone foundation. Are they all prickly lettuce at various stages of growth? Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear BrooklineBiker, good morning. I can only make out the plant of focus in a couple of the images (they are a bit small in two of the images). The large leaf with crisped margins (undulating like lasagna) is a species of Rumex (dock). Rumex crispus (curly dock) is a common species that appears around homes and in gardens, though there are a couple of other common species in this genus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    These two ferns/plants were found clinging to a rock wall beside a waterfall in upstate NY. I'm just getting started learning my ferns and any advice would be helpful. Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you have photographed two different species. The first one, growing out from the open crack of the rock, is a species of Cystopteris (fragile fern), likely Cystopteris bulbifera (bulbil fragile fern). The other fern is a species of Asplenium (spleenwort), likely Asplenium quadrivalens (common maidenhair spleenwort). Both of these species grow on high pH rocks and cliffs. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is this? The tiny buds along the outer edges of the leaves are seedling. That's how I grew these in about a month or so. I Just dropped them in water. Tampa Florida.
    Answer
    Dear MalcolmX, you appear to have photographed a species of Bryophyllum (a member of the Crassulaceae, stonecrop family). These plants are native to the African and Asian continents. The ability of this plant to produce small, vegetative plantlets along the margins of the leaves is a good identifying character.
  • Question
    Good Afternoon, I live in Nh and am having difficulty identifying an early perennial that's popping up all over my perennial garden. I originally thought it to be mint or Greek oregano as I have a few varieties in the garden as well but it is not. It has very dark purple leaves, has no scent and seems to be spreading. Any thoughts?
    Answer
    Dear WendyDr, there are no images associated with your post. If you are having trouble uploading images, please send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I can't find the name of this plant. Can you help me?
    Answer
    Dear Masoume, I can't fully help you because I don't know where this plant was collected. It looks similar to the European Ranunculus auricomus (Greenland crowfoot). If you can supply information that provides the origin of this plant, I can help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is this plant please. I live in south western Pennsylvania. Just found it laying on the ground a tree the edge of my woods. Oak and maple trees around.
    Answer
    Holly, you've photographed a gall from a species of wasp that lays it eggs in the leaves of certain oaks. These spherical galls are characteristic of this species of insect. Thanks for sharing your discovery.
  • Question
    Hi! I'm hoping to identify these 4 plants for a class I'm taking, but they are so young that their features are a little ambiguous and I am not sure how to use the key for them. All of them are growing in Greenfield, MA. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear aribenjamin, I'll help you as much as I can. The first image (with the arrow) I'm unable to assist because the plant is blurry in the photograph. The second image (arrow pointing left) is Lysimachia borealis (starflower). The third image (with the heart-shaped leaf) may be a species like Eurybia divaricate (white wood-aster). The final image is Toxicodendron rydbergii (western poison-ivy). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I am trying to investigate dimorphism in Pyrrosia Piloselloides for my school project but I'm not sure how. I know there are two types of fronds in this species- the fertile frond and sterile frond and I tried to study the fern cycle. How far do environmental conditions affect the dimorphism in Pyrrosia Piloselloides or is it age that affect the dimorphism? How do I quantify this data? This species can be found in North eastern India, Malaysia and almost every part of Singapore.
    Answer
    Dear Bambpp, I'm not sure I will be able to help you enough for your study. That written, many ferns demonstrate dimorphism between the sterile (i.e., vegetative) and fertile (i.e., reproductive) leaves. Those leaves that bear spores are sometimes very different from those leaves that do not bear spores. These differences are independent of age or habitat. You might investigate this route first. Good luck with your study.
  • Question
    What is the name of this lichen growing on an old rotting birch log... I'm in Canada, Ontario, Algoma District Thank You!
    Answer
    Dear Lisette, good afternoon. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Lichens and fungi, while very cool topics, are not within the realm of expertise of this website. I suggest submitting your photograph to a fungus-dedicated group on social media to find an answer to your question. Good luck.
  • Question
    This plant was found in a very wet forest near Rensselaerville NY. I believe it is a Ranunculus species. The one irregularly shaped leaf in the second photo puts me off of R. arbortivus. Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you plant looks very much like Ranunculus abortivus. The irregularly shaped leaf you refer to is not uncommon in this species and its near relatives. There are two other species that look similar (R. allegheniensis and R. micranthus), but they are less common than R. abortivus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is this?
    Answer
    LorenzoNine, good morning. This is a species of hickory (genus Carya). These are the leaves and bracts of leaf opening that are really conspicuous and quite beautiful this time of year. I can't tell you for certain which species without knowing more information, such as your location (the general region of the photographer is vital information for people to help answer what a plant is). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, we have been digging these up and eating them for years but do not know the name of them can you please help me in finding the correct name? Found in Lookout, CA. USA
    Answer
    Dear bet96054, there is no image attached to your post. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to send the images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you.
  • Question
    The McCabe Forest in Antrim, NH is a mixed soft/hardwood forest. May 2, after heavy rains, much of it was very wet. These flowers were spreading in dense patches. The first photo is Anemone quinquefolia. To its right, a small white cluster. The second photo shows an open cluster: Panax trifolius? My books show bigger umbels.
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, your plants are Panax trifolius (dwarf ginseng), a native member of the Apiaceae. These umbels are very typical for New England plants (the books you've referenced may be showing plants from other areas--though I don't know the books you're using). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good Morning! I live in the Mohawk Valley in the state of New York. I found this cute little flower growing all by itself next to my pond this Spring. Can you identify for me? Thanks very much, Brenda
    Answer
    Dear Peaches, you've photographed a species of Fritillaria (missionbells or checkered-lily). This is a member of the Liliaceae (lily family). These are species predominantly of western North America. I can't tell you which species this is because they are outside of my region of expertise. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Dear Ace Botanist; Please identify this tree that volunteered in our garden. I think it may be a Green Alder. The location is Newport, Rhode Island about 1000 feet north of the Atlantic Ocean. Rob
    Answer
    Dear RobRichter, good morning. The shrub you have photographed is a species of Prunus (cherry, plum). I would not be able to tell you which species without flowers/fruits, but it looks like a cultivar of Prunus serrulata (Japanese flowering cherry). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm trying to identify this plant. It is growing on the side of our driveway in southern Vermont. The sharply toothed leaves and reddish underside of the leaf seems like it should be make it easy, but I have been unable to find an identification. Can you help me? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Imc825, Your plant looks like a member of the genus Eurybia (wood-aster), and is likely Eurybia divaricata (white wood-aster). There are a few species in the aster family with conspicuously heart-shaped leaves, but these seem to match for this genus the best.
  • Question
    Can you please help me ID this plant? I found it a few days ago in the berkshires in a very moist wooded area. The flowers are on a bush. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Likenscassie, your plant is Viburnum lantanoides (hobblebush), a native viburnum found in forested areas in New England. The enlarged sterile flowers around the margin of the inflorescence and stellate-branched hairs on the leaves (you'll need magnification to see this) are good identifying characteristics.
  • Question
    This plant is growing in my garden in Simi Valley California and I'd like to know what it is?
    Answer
    Dear ildiko4, I'm sorry that I cannot help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. If you need help finding someone closer to you that would have expertise of the regional flora of your area, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I'll direct you to the appropriate organization. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Would you mind helping me ID the plant in the attached picture? I was hiking on a rustic trail in the inner section of Cape Ann, Ma (close to Dogtown). This plant had two woody stems, one short upright and the4 foot stem pictured, was flopping over a rock. I think it resembles Sambucus. The environs were rocky moraine wetland. - Bruce
    Answer
    Dear brucepiper40, good morning. Your plant is Sambucus racemosa (red elderberry), a native shrub of New England. It is the first of our native elderberries to flower and will fruit earlier as well than the black elderberry.
  • Question
    Looking for an ID on this shrub like plant growing in a woodland habitat in southeastern CT. Single white flower at the end with 2 deeply toothed opposite leaves on either side. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Colleentara, your plant is Rhodotypos scandens (black jetbead), a non-native member of the Rosaceae (rose family). This is a species that has been sparingly introduced into southern New England. It will have a black fruit later in the season. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have been trying to figure out this plant. It is a shrub located about 10-15ft from a pond in Simsbury Ct, at Stratton Brook State Park. The plant is about 7ft tall. The longest leaves average 57mm from tip to base (not including the petiole), and average 20mm wide. The short leaves average 30-35mm in length, and average 20mm wide. The under side of the leaf is grayish and fussy in appearance. The leaf margins are serrated. The buds seem to be scales with hairs on them.
    Answer
    Dear mjl1982, your plant is a species of willow (genus Salix). There are several details that I cannot see from your photographs that make it impossible for me to tell you which species this is. It could be Salix humilis (prairie willow) or Salix cinerea (gray willow), the former native, the latter non-native. If you want to continue this discussion, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can direct you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Would like to ID this pine tree. Located in NYC, Riverside park, alongside the Hudson River. There is a stand along the clay tennis courts. Maybe a pitch pine? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear mtardiff, I would not be able to confidently identify a pine that may have been planted in a park. It could have originated from locations where I do not have taxonomic expertise. It is not Pinus rigida (pitch pine) as that species has longer pollen cones with a different morphology than those you posted here. I assume this pine has three leaves per fascicle (as you suggested pitch pine as the identification). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you please help me identify this plant? Recently moved to Northern VT and it's growing over half of the yard. It has a single leaf per stem that is freckled on one side and solid colored on the other. If I try to pull it out of the ground only a white stem comes up, no roots. Also if it helps the soil is sandy and mossy where is it growing and the plants ranges from the height pictured to two inches currently.
    Answer
    Dear sbissonette, the plant you have photographed is Erythronium americanum (American trout-lily). This is a native, spring-flowering herb in the lily family. Some of these plants will soon produce a beautiful yellow flower. Enjoy them.
  • Question
    Hello, I live in southeastern Wisconsin, and stumbled upon this website while trying to identify a plant I've seen growing in my yard. I first saw it two years ago, but not last year. This year, I was able to avoid it with the lawn mower and took a couple pictures. I am thinking that it is Barbarea vulgaris, but I think I see pictures of more than one plant specie in the sample pictures, and wanted to ask before posting: are the pictures I have taken of Barbarea vulgaris, or something else?
    Answer
    Dear holymackerel87, the plant you have photographed does appear to be a species of Barbarea (yellow rocket). I can't tell you for certain which species it is without seeing open flowers and close-up images of certain morphological features. That written, it is likely to be Barbarea vulgaris, as you noted. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you please help me identify this plant I found growing in woods on my property?
    Answer
    Dear usafpatriot, your photographs appear to have captured the leaf opening of a species of Carya (hickory). These species have conspicuous colored bracts that open up to reveal the expanding leaves. I don't know where this photograph was taken, so I can't help any further (i.e., location is a very important piece of information needed for identification). I hope this is still helpful and best wishes.
  • Question
    Thanks for your reply (about the twigs). Unfortunately the tree was pulled down with heavy snow so there is just the stump left - here is a picture of the bark. Cheers Shaun
    Answer
    Dear Shaun, that's too bad, I was looking forward to seeing more of this tree. Given the Vinca minor in the background, is it possible this tree is cultivated at the edge of a yard? If so, it could explain why I don't recognize it. I don't know what part of southern ME you are in, but perhaps we could arrange a visit sometime when I am coming through the area. Happy to connect if that would be of help (and if possible). My email is ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi. Im new to southern Maine and trying to learn plants. Just took the course in winter trees and got the Trees of Canada and the US - but cant figure out what tree this is. Here are pictures of the buds and leaf scar. Hope you can help. Cheers Shaun
    Answer
    Dear Shaun, good morning. I've been looking at these images for several weeks waiting for the tree's identity to come to me. I must admit I don't recognize this tree from the branchlets you've photographed. Any chance you can get an image of the bark or leaves at the base of the tree? These might be clues that would allow me to help you identify the species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you please tell me what this is
    Answer
    Francey-that, good morning. I'm sorry that I'm unable to help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Cultivated species can originate from all over the globe and are sometimes unknown to me. I'm sorry I cannot be of more assistance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    CAn you tell me want plant this is? It comes up every year in my flower bed, sometime has a whit bloom
    Answer
    Dear karen9018, it is very difficult to help you without knowing a bit more information. Location is very important in narrowing down the choices for what your plant may be. Given that there are upwards of 500,000 species of plants on the earth, learning the general area helps to eliminate those species that aren't found in a region. If you can assist with this information, I may be able to help. I can be reached at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, additional photographs from different angles will be useful. Thank you.
  • Question
    these 2 plants have shot up in my greenhouse. I have never seen any thing like it but I do buy a lot of bird food (seeds ect) from our local shops. sorry just read about you being in new England .I am in cornwall uk.
    Answer
    Dear Les, I'm happy to help whenever I can. In this case, I do recognize this plant. It is Euphorbia lathyris (gopher spurge). The opposite leaves in 4 distinct ranks with the pale midvein are good identifying characters. If you bruise a leaf, you will notice a white latex exuding from it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I think this plant may be ginseng, but am not sure. The second photo shows a bit of the root. It is growing in woodland near a stream in southern Vermont. Thanks for your help. lmc825
    Answer
    Dear Imc825, this plant is a woody species with opposite, pinnately compound leaves. Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng) is an herbaceous plant with (usually) whorled, palmately compound leaves. It looks as though you have photographed a Sambucus (elderberry) seedling. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I think these plants may be viburnum nudum seedlings, what do you think? They are growing in woodland near a stream in southern Vermont. As always, your help is much appreciated. lmc825
    Answer
    Dear Imc825, I believe you are correct. They do look like Viburnum nudum seedlings. Thanks for sharing and best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi I found this little plant in my yard and I'm wondering what plant it it and if it's edible ( next to some dandelions in my lawn). Thank you for your time😁
    Answer
    Dear Sorgenman, the flowers you have posted belong to a species of Viola (violet). On lawns, hybrid individuals with Viola cucullata (marsh violet) and/or Viola sororia (woolly violet) are common. These are edible species, both the leaves and the flowers. You can enjoy them raw in salads, etc. It is always good to try a small serving first if this is a new food to identify how your body reacts to it. Enjoy.
  • Question
    Hi, I am trying to id the attached small woody plant. The red venation of the leaves seems unique and is not familiar to me. This plant is in the Gill Town Forest, and the photo is from a couple days ago. Several twigs had been trimmed, presumably munched. I could not get the id with the gobotany process. Thanks for your help. Nora
    Answer
    Dear nhanke, I can't confidently identify the plant from the photograph that has been provided. The opposite leaves and crenate teeth could place this as a species of Viburnum (such as Viburn nudum [with-rod or wild raisin]). I would need to see details of winter buds and leaf scars on the branchlet to confirm this. Best wishes.
  • Question
    May I ask if what plant is this?
    Answer
    Dear katkatgagan2608, I'm sorry I'm unable to help with your identification question. I don't recognize this species and wonder what part of the world this photograph was taken in. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. If you let me know your location, I may be able to find someone in your region to help with identification (assuming this is a wild species and not planted). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, Can you help me to select an evergreen ground covering plants.
    Answer
    Dear Gurcharan, The New England Wild Flower Society could certainly suggest some species for you, but we need a lot more information. It would be important to learn things like where you are located in the world, how dry/moist the soil is, how much shade there is, and the general pH of the soil (acidic, etc.). Without some of this information, it would be difficult for anyone to suggest species that would thrive in your location. Feel free to send me an email at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can pass along this information (and your question) to someone who can help.
  • Question
    This plant is invading my lawn and flower beds. Pic is attached. Can you ID? Method to control spreading? Thanks. Best, Ray Dona
    Answer
    Dear RayDona, good morning. You have photographed a species of Allium (onion, garlic). It could be Allium vineale (crow garlic), a species with narrow leaves and small bulbs. It is edible and any harvests of it you make can be used in the kitchen. It is difficult to control through herbicides because of the waxy nature of the leaves (chemicals do not stick well to this species). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello again, thanks for previous answer. I'm sending you a picture of a plant, and again I'm asking you if you can determine it? The picture so the plant is from Croatia. Best regards, Simon
    Answer
    Dear Simon, I'm sorry I cannot help you with this one. Croatia is outside of my realm of expertise--though sometimes I can recognize the plants because we share some genera between our two continents. If you need an email address to someone closer to you who may know of these species, let me know (you can email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org).
  • Question
    What is this plant?
    Answer
    Dear Sarahcadantheusarabicus, good morning. I would like to help you but you appear to have posted an image of a cultivated plant. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. While we are happy to entertain all plant related questions, because cultivated species can originate from many parts of the world, such questions can be outside of the expertise here. I'm sorry I can't be of more help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I bought this plant recently and I can't figure out what this is. I'm in Oklahoma.
    Answer
    Dear spaceirsrad, there is no image attached to your post/question. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help. Please include any useful information you can, such as habitat, time of year, etc.
  • Question
    Hello. My sister, who lives in Mansfield, MA, is looking for suggestions for wild plants that can be used to make yarn (by spinning). She knows about milkweed already. She'd prefer that they be ones that are ok to harvest, such as invasives. Do you have any that you'd recommend trying? She also spends time up in the Eastport, Maine area, so plants up there would be good to know about, as well. Thanks for your help.
    Answer
    Dear AbbyG3, good morning. There are a great many fiber plants in New England, though I do not know which ones can be spun to make a yarn. Here is a list of herbaceous plants that do not require retting and have strong fibers, though each has its own necessary techniques of collection and fiber extraction: Abutilon theophrasti, Apocynum androsaemifolium, Apocynum Asclepias cannabinum incarnata, Asclepias syriaca, Chamaenerion angustifolium, Laportea Canadensis, Oenothera biennis, Urtica dioica, and Urtica gracilis.
  • Question
    I found a possible field pennycress in my lawn can you confirm if this is feild pennycress? Massachusetts usa
    Answer
    Dear Sorgenman, good morning. I can't see the details necessary to make a confident determination. As best I can tell, the plant you have photographed has a conspicuous basal rosette of leaves and few stem leaves. This would not fit with the morphology of Thlaspi arvense (field penny-cress). This plant looks similar to Arabidopsis thaliana (mouse-ear thale-cress), another non-native mustard that is introduced to New England. If this hypothesis is correct, you should be able to find branched hairs on the leaves of this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    4/16/17 flowering woody stemmed plant along trail in Montpelier VT Pink 4 petaled flowers, no leaves visible. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear joshl, your shrub in the image is Daphne mezereum (February daphne). This is a non-native species that has been introduced sparingly in New England. It is among the first shrubs with showy flowers to bloom in the spring. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is the yellow thing? I am from Tunisia.
    Answer
    Dear Sarahcadantheusarabicus, the plant you have photographed looks like a species of Aloe (a monocot placed in the Asphodelaceae). However, I cannot be confident of this determination because Tunisia is a long way from my region of expertise (northeastern United States). Perhaps this will still help you with your study of this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am in north west Arkansas in the river valley. This plant is highly invasive, C an you tell me what this plant is?
    Answer
    Dear carolfrancks, there is no image associated with your question. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you out. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I have been trying to figure out what kind of plant this is. The seed was small and black. The stem and leaves have trichomes that make it very fuzzy and leave a sticky residue on your fingers. The leaves are rounded, have netted veins, and have an alternate leaf arrangement. I am unaware of the location but I hope you can help! Thank you! -Mia Pagliuco
    Answer
    Dear plantsarecoolbotany, you have photographed a species of Nicotiana (tobacco). Some species have glandular hairs that do leave a noticeable residue on the fingers when they are contacted. I do not know which species you have photographed because cultivated collections could hail from many parts of the world (outside of my region of expertise). That written, it looks similar to Nicotiana rustica (Aztec tobacco). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I apologize for the less-than-great image quality, but I found these tiny flowers in the grass and haven't been able to find a name for them. One is a blueish color, maybe faintly purple, with darker stripes radiating from the center. The other is solid orange, and looked somewhat like a rose that hadn't fully bloomed when I first picked it. Any sort of help or even just a point in the right general direction would be appreciated, I can't find anything about these little guys!
    Answer
    Dear smolbeau, I can try to assist you, but without knowing what region of the world these images were taken in, I can only offer educated guesses. There are upwards of 500,000 species of plants in the world and knowing the general location helps to narrow down the possible choices. The one on the left looks like Lysimachia arvensis (synonym: Anagallis arvensis), called scarlet pimpernel. The one of the right appears to be a species of Veronica, called speedwell. I can't tell you which one because there are a number of species and we would need leaves, stems, and inflorescences to determine exactly which one. Note the upper petal is larger than the lower petal, a characteristic of this genus. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    We saw this tree in NY on vacation peppered in the state parks near rivers in NJ & NY and in yards and along roadsides. We first noticed it in Ringwood New Kersey State Park and then in Barcelona, NY. It had a large, whitish-pink, cup-shaped flower pointing upward at tip of branches. It was not leafed out at all and the bark did not seem flaky but ridged. It was at least 60 feet tall with a very straight trunk. I am from Kansas and have never seen a tree like this. What is it?
    Answer
    Dear coleenb@lovetrees, you have photographed the remnant fruits on Liriodendron tulipifera (tuliptree), a member of the Magnolia Family. This is a large tree that is native to areas you were travelling in.
  • Question
    I found Conopholis americana but I live in southern WV does it still qualify for your site?
    Answer
    Dear pAMOLA, good morning. Beautiful find and thank you for sharing your plant. You are welcome to share this plant on the site. While Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England, feel free to post the image and share with other plant enthusiasts. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, a friend gave to me this plant, I don't know how is called, I'm trying to make her bonsai. Please can you tell me the name, and if I can realise a bonsai with her. Regards
    Answer
    Dear gerilula, good morning. I'm sorry I cannot provide you an answer to your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While all plant-related questions will be entertained, cultivated plants can hail from all over the world and be outside the realm of expertise cultivated here. I hope you are able to find an answer to your question.
  • Question
    Hi, I was wondering, are there any plants that when damaged will/can grow back stronger?
    Answer
    Meepy, good morning. Your question is a little too broad to be able to give you an answer. It would depend on the species, the kind of damage it experiences, and even the time of year the damage happens. Many plants are quite capable of healing back from damage to their aerial and subterranean organs, so long as that damage does not overwhelm their systems. If you have more specific areas of interest with regard to this question, I can try to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this is a plant which is photographed in Croatia, it grows at the slopes of Dinara mountain. Can you indentify it? It flowers in mid-May. Sincerely, Simon
    Answer
    Dear Simon, you have photographed a species of Saxifraga (saxifrage). It appears to be Saxifraga paniculata (white mountain saxifrage), a species that has lime-encrusted pores near the apex of each tooth on the basal leaves). Beautiful images--thank you for sharing.
  • Question
    I found this image on gobotany, described as Galium labradoricum. (This isn't my photo. It is attributed to Donald Cameron.) I am curious about the pink flowers (fruits) in this image. I've seen white variations in nature of flowers that are typically red, but not the other way around. Terry Serres
    Answer
    Dear botanybear, the petals of Galium labradoricum are usually white and are in all individuals I've ever seen. The ovaries do turn red in several species (including this one). They mature from green to red as the season progresses. While I cannot see for certain, I suspect the red structures you see in the image are in fact the ovaries and not the petals. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thank you for your response. The ligule is at most .5 mm, but is membranous. The photos are not great, but the best I can do. I checked at the Connell Herbarium and none of the Juncus tenuis there had leaves and flowering stalks so narrow (< 0.5 mm). I greatly appreciate your assistance.
    Answer
    Dear Apohaqui2810, There are a few other species in the Juncus tenuis complex that share morphological similarity with that species. Juncus anthelatus is a taller plant with short capsules and long internodes in the inflorescence (it too has long, scarious auricles like J. tenuis). Both J. dudleyi and J. dichotomous have short, firm auricles. The former is a species of high pH rivershore ledges and gravels (most of the time) with yellow, cartilaginous auricles. The latter is a plant of varied habitats with usually green or pale, membranceous auricles. Its leaves are 0.5-1 mm wide--this may well be the species you've collected. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am very new to farming. I have Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) and Gibberellic Acid (GA3) and I am going to be using it on pole beans but I dont know how to use it. Can you let me know how to use IAA and GA3. Can you please be specific on the quantity and keep the answer simple because I am new to farming.
    Answer
    Dear hitanshu, good afternoon. Neither of these chemicals is required for growing pole beans. I'm not sure what your ultimate goals are. You might want to contact an organization that specializes in the use of such chemicals for growing cultivated species (Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern portion of North America). I hope you find the answers your are seeking.
  • Question
    Many thanks for your suggestion of Sporobolus cryptandrus. While it does not seem to be a perfect fit, the location is one that I can return to this summer and hopefully find the plant in flower or seed. If you are correct, it would be a new record for New Brunswick. Thank you for sharing your time and expertise!
    Answer
    You're most welcome. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in tolerant hardwoods along X country ski trail, 25 km west of Fredericton NB. Most capsules had been invaded and seeds eaten. One capsule survived and had tailless seeds. Continues to key out to Juncus tenuis, but plant seems too fine. Leaves <0.5 mm wide, flat to inrolled, non-septate. Some flowers single, others in groups of 2-3. Is this just a fine J. tenuis? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Apohaqui2810, I would not be able to distinguish Juncus tenuis (which this looks very much like) from J. dichotomous from the images provided. You will need to examine the ligules to determine which species it is. Juncus tenuis has elongate, scarious ligules vs. short and firm in J. dichotomous. If you need help, try to upload a close-up image of the area where the leaf sheath meets the leaf blade and I can try to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, thanks for answering my last question! This wildflower was photographed last year in VT on June 8th. It was found at the edge of a pasture (that isn’t grazed much) near a wooded area. I'm not sure how tall it was, but I'd guess a little over a foot. What kind of aster is it? I can't seem to find any asters like it that bloom in the spring here. Thanks again for your help!!
    Answer
    Dear BirdNuts, your plant is Erigeron pulchellus (Robin's plantain fleabane). While related to our American asters, it resides in a separate genus. This is a common, summer-flowering species in New England that grows usually in open areas. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This non-fertile grass was growing in close association with Panicum acuminatum along a cross-country ski trail margin going through a young tolerant hardwoods. It was hoped the incredibly long, thin leaves (<2 mm wide, 15-28 cm long) should be definitive. Location is just west of Fredericton NB. Any help would be appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear Apohaqui2810, while I can't be certain without reproductive material, the pubescent at the summit of the leaf sheaths and the morphology of the leaf sheaths themselves suggests Sporobolus cryptandrus. I would start there with your study and see if you can confirm this. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Does anyone know what this plant is? My dad said it is a weed. Before I pull it up, I want to make sure.
    Answer
    Dear rwilliams85, I do not recognize this plant. Unfortunately, TN is a long way from the New England region and you have a great many plants which do not grow this far north. I suggest you contact a local herbarium in your region that would have a good understanding of the local flora. If you need help finding an institution, I can help with this. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you identify this plant that we found on a hike in middle Tennessee yesterday?
    Answer
    Dear AmandaD, good morning. You have collected a species of Trillium (wake-robin). These plants will have a single flower with three sepals and three colored petals. I do not know which species you have collected without seeing an open flower. However, hopefully knowing the genus will get you started with your study of this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I got a lavender - I mean this is what I thought it was - but it grows a bit weird. I have not found a picture of a similar one. Any ideas? Thanks! Karolina
    Answer
    Dear ovisammon, I'm sorry that I cannot help you with your request. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild-growing plants of New England. While we are happy to entertain all plant-related questions, some topics, especially identification of cultivated plants, can be outside of our knowledge base. These plants can originate from many parts of the world that are quite distant to our region of expertise. I hope you are able to find the answer you are seeking. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, came across this fruit/flower in the Malaysian tropical jungle. Can anyone tell me what this is? Poisonous or not? Thanks. Cheers, Monica
    Answer
    Dear Monica, I'm sorry that I will not be able to assist you. Go Botany is a resource dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. While we are happy to entertain all questions related to plants, some are outside of our regional expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I've been trying to identify this plant for a while now , it is a potted plant I got as a present so the location where it grows natively I'm not sure of.
    Answer
    Dear hillary_17, there is no image associated with your post. Without an image, it will be impossible for me to help you. If you are having trouble posting images, please feel free to email them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help you.
  • Question
    Hello, I have been struggling to identify this flower I photographed in September almost 6 years ago. I think I found it in the driest area of my yard in VT. I do not have photos of the leaves. I don't remember much about the plant other than that it was very low to the ground and tiny (but its growth could have been stunted because it was in the middle of our mowed lawn). Here is a link to my photo: https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2861/33169588901_fcc5b9c022_c.jpg Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear BirdNuts, your plant is Polygala sanguinea (blood milkwort), a native member of the milkwort family. These small plants generally grown in open areas without much competition from other plants, such as lawns, old roadbeds, clearings, roadsides, etc. Beautiful image (thank you for sharing it).
  • Question
    Hello, I have no idea what region my plant could be found, but I have determined that it must be a eudicot because it has 5 petals on the flower. Also I think it must live in an arid region because the leaves are very thick and seem to be used for water storage.
    Answer
    Dear deesoule, I'm sorry I cannot help you with your image. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we are happy to entertain all questions related to plants, some cultivated species are not known to us. Your plant is a eudicot, as you noted, given the corolla and leaf morphology. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you please identify this plant for me It was found on my farm in east texas Curtis
    Answer
    Dear ccol45, your plant appears to be a species of palmetto (genus Sabal). It could be Sabal minor (dwarf palmetto). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is there any blue pine trees grown in round shape, not in cone shape?
    Answer
    Dear xiaoxuan1202, there are several things that affect the shape of a tree, including the species, where it grows, and whether or not it is pruned to a shape. For example, if trees grow in the open sun, they take on a more rounded shape than if they are grown in a forested setting and are placing energy into height to compete for sunlight. Of course, trees and shrubs can be pruned to take on certain shapes. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    i saw this plant in a nursery in FtLauderdale and it was growing in a large terrarium it didnt have any flowers just beautiful pink leaves . The leaves looked like coleus leaf but larger and pink , please help , Thank You !
    Answer
    Dear olman, there is no image associated with your question. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you help identify this mustard found in Brookfield, CT? It is very large (~4ft) in upland areas.
    Answer
    Dear KDC, good morning. The plant you've pictured is, as best I can tell from the photographs, Brassica nigra (black mustard). This is an infrequent introduction in New England that can be common in some areas, especially in disturbed sites and along river banks. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, thank you for the answer to the last question! This herbaceous plant was found in a forested wetland in June. This plant was located in Southeastern Connecticut. The plant was less than a 1 foot in height.
    Answer
    Deer eehrlich, your plant is Caltha palustris (marsh-marigold), a native member of the crowfoot family. These are the fruits, which will open by one suture to release the seeds. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. I found this growing in my hoop house in RI. I know the picture isn't great. It's Definitley in the mint family as it has a square stem. Could it be heal all?
    Answer
    Dear NNEL, Your plant is indeed a member of the mint family (Lamiaceae). Although, it is worth mentioning that there are other families of plants with square stems. The plant pictured is a species of Lamium (henbit). It is likely Lamium purpureum (purple henbit). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm from India, but my question is just general. Why does beetroot have rings on it when cut horizontally?
    Answer
    Dear vinay, the concentric rings you refer to are bands of vascular tissue alternating with parenchyma. Parenchyma is one of the most common types of tissue in plants and makes up the bulk of softer, non-woody material. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This shrub was located along a dirt road in Jackman, Maine. The road bordered a alder wetland. The shrub was approximately 5 feet in height. These "cones?" were present at the end of each branch. These shrubs seemed to be numerous in the area. The buds were small and pointed. The terminal "cone" was new to me. Thanks!
    Answer
    Deer eehrlich, these are galls made by an insect on the tips of branchlets of Salix (willow). These are most commonly found on Salix discolor (pussy willow), but may be on other species. This one in particular is called pine cone willow gall and is created by a species of midge. Best wishes.
  • Question
    From a coastal island in New Brunswick, near Maine. Polygonum buxiforme? Achenes are 2.7 mm long, and the pattern on the achene surface is arranged in somewhat longitudinal rows, not sure if this is striate-papillose. Pouch-like swelling is not at base of tepals, but at base of their distinct portion. Tepals are >3 mm long, plants were prostrate on shore.
    Answer
    Thokozile, the best match I can see for this plant is Polygonum buxiforme. The tepal morphology looks like a good fit, as does the shape of the achene. Polygonum fowleri, another common species in saline/brackish environments has a very different achene (both in terms of its shape and surface pattern). Thanks for sharing the great images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I found this very pretty flower tattoo but I cannot identify or find the name of the flower. If there is any way you can identify it, that would be wonderful. Thank you so much.
    Answer
    Dear Caassiiee, as is often the case, tattooed flowers are not exact matches for any flower that is grown or occurs in the wild. However, your image is relatively close to the genus Myosotis (called forget-me-not), a group with wild and cultivated species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I saw this plant in Tate Georgia today, it was obviously planted and not native but I cannot find any information on it and I am very interested to know more about it. If you can give me a clue I would be thrilled! Thank you
    Answer
    Dear Rachrose98, there is no image associated with your question. Without one (or more), I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I have no idea what region my plant might live, but I have decided that it is a eudicot because it has flowers with 5 petals. It may live in an arid region because the leaves are very thick.
    Answer
    Dear deesoule, There is no image associated with your question. If you are having a difficult time uploading images, feel free to email them to "ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org", and I can try to help you with your request.
  • Question
    This plant was observed 2/1/17 in Southborough, MA in a roadside wetland/stream. As shown in the habitat picture, these plants were the only green vegetation in the area. Plants were rooted in soft sediment and extended 6-10 in above the water surface. The plants were very healthy and vibrant green when picked, but have deteriorated slightly since being indoors. The largest leaves are approx. 8 cm long and 3-4 cm at their widest point. Any ID assistance would be greatly appreciated!
    Answer
    Joy, good morning. I'm not sure what species this plant is, though it reminds me of a species of willow-herb (genus Epilobium). It could be Epilobium ciliatum or E. coloratum, though I do not often see that plant grow in such a dense colony. I will share your image with some other botanists to see if we can find a confident identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thank you so much for your answer, it is very helpful, and thank you for this amazing resource! I've found a dozen native plants I can use instead of imported & potentially disruptive ones.
    Answer
    Dear conormac, thanks for your kind words. I'm very happy to read that this site is serving you well. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you help identifying this plant please sir it was found on my land in south east texas Curtis
    Answer
    Dear ccol45, good morning. I'm sorry but there is no image associated with your question. Without an image, it will be impossible for me to assist. If you are having trouble uploading an image, feel free to email one to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org . I will do what I can to assist.
  • Question
    I found this a couple of weeks ago growing in a wooded area in RI? Can you help id. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear NNEL, there are several species this could be, but please examine images of Packera obovate (running groundsel). This species forms small colonies of basal leaves in forests and woodlands, especially rocky types. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I wonder if you have any suggestions as to what this could be. It's low-growing (I think only basal leaves are present) and spreads vigorously, it's bright green and appears in October and is cheerful and robust through springtime, when the bayberry it lives under leafs out. I've observed it for two years and have not identified a flower or seed. It's in a sunny dry location in Providence, RI. Bayberry leaves for scale. I'd like to know if it's native or at least benign!
    Answer
    Dear conormac, I can't help you with confidence with this plant. There are several species these small, winter-green basal leaves could below to. Given the setting, you might consider looking into various species of Geranium that this might be. Sorry I can't be of more assistance.
  • Question
    Hi, Found what I believe to be a species of sedge. The photo is dated back in January in Groton, Connecticut. The Plant is still green and smooth. The leaf blade was approximately one half inch in diameter and 9-12 inches in length. The plant was clumped and located in a "floodplain" area along a large stream. The area is wet during parts of the year but flooding only occurs every 10 years. The surrounding forest composition is mostly oak, beech, hornbeam and red maple and Clethra. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, beautiful images, but I cannot tell which species. There are several members of the genus Carex this could be, which have the distinctive M-shaped leaf blades in cross-section due to the prominent lateral nerves that are as evident (or more so) than the mid-nerve. If you are able to find remnant fruits or can find an this plant next growing season, I would be happy to help out. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, This is a picture of a flower taken in Mauritius in January this year (summer there). It was in the forest, mostly humid region
    Answer
    Dear Dina, I would love to be able to help you with this interesting plant you have shared an image of. However, land in the Indian Ocean is well outside my range of expertise. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. If you need help finding an herbarium to direct questions to, let me know and I can help.
  • Question
    This plant comes from Corfu Arillas not far from the sea about 1 mile the hight is 6-8 inches spreads This one has , a sort of green gooseberry type fruit When ripe the berry can pop and the "sap" is said to be poisonous. the leaves are hairy can you help to identify this plant please
    Answer
    Dear ARILLASKEV, I would love to be able to help you with this interesting plant you have shared an image of. However, Greece is well outside my range of expertise. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. If you need help finding an herbarium to direct questions to, let me know and I can help.
  • Question
    Many thanks for your response. In comparing my specimen with herbarium specimens of Hylotelephium telephium I think you are 100% correct. I will look for tubers next time I see this species. With appreciation
    Answer
    Apohaqui2810, good morning. I'm glad to be of help and also happy it looks like we found a good match for your specimen. Be well.
  • Question
    Plant found on west side of Frye Is., coastal NB., 12 miles east of Maine. 10' in from the coast in open coniferous stand growning up around an old mining exploration site. No flowers present. Underleaf has little small sessile red glands. Small cluster of light orange glands at the base of the plant. Fresh leaf was succulent, now dried, it is semi-transparent (one can see the glands through the upper leaf surface. Leaves opposite with mostly entire margin. Any help would be appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear Apohaqui2810, good afternoon. I can't be certain of what species you have, but it looks like seedlings of Hylotelephium telephium (purple orpine, formerly called Sedum purpureum). If you get a chance to return, this species would have narrow, pale, carrot-shaped tubers underground--which would help confirm the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I think this is Suaeda maritima. From a coastal sand beach in Washington County, Maine. Sepals are rounded, without keels. This must be ssp. maritima because utricles are 1.7 mm long and longest (dried) leaves are >20 mm long. Is the red color of utricles diagnostic?
    Answer
    Dear thokozile, It does look like you have collected Suaeda maritime subsp. maritma. The color of the fruit is, in my experience, a function of the maturity. They will darken more when collected later in the season. Beautiful images--thank you for sharing and I hope you are well.
  • Question
    Hello, I just want a clear explanation of blackberry roots, are they deep rooted? What type of root it has. I got different info on line, so I need to clarify it. Thanks for the help in Advance.
    Answer
    Dear guiroyaby, here is a little information from the horticulture department: "Blackbery roots usually don't go very deeply in the soil, but the plants can be tough to dig in the summer when they are azctively growing. Plants are easy to pop out in early spring when dormant or before they start really growing, and in fact you should always dig them and plant them when they are dormant – planting in active growth or leaf sets the plants back."
  • Question
    Hi, I think I have finally found a ground cover that I often see in the woods around eastern Ma -- goes by several names such as vinca minor, periwinkle... I like the variety that spreads rapidly and that can tolerate a dog running over it. At last, an alternative to failed attempts to grow grass. Part sun, part shade. Any suggestions on where to buy it or virtues of particular varieties. This is all part of my campaign to make my yard more forested! Thanks so much! Acidic soil?
    Answer
    Dear ecahan, I can appreciate your interest in Vinca minor, given it does such a nice job with covering the ground. However, it is non-native and can be aggressive, sometimes leaving the cultivated setting. The Horticultural Department has suggested some native species that could work in your situation. These include: Maianthemum canadense will tolerate traffic, shade, and acid soils. Carex pensylvanica will tolerate some foot traffic, shade and acid. Other options that might not be as happy with constant trampling: Tiarella cordifolia, Asarum canadense, and Vaccinium angustifolium. I hope you find this information useful.
  • Question
    A broken red oak (I think) tree branch had many of these scary things on it. Are they some kind of gall? These pictures were taken on December 23, 2016, in the woods in Windsor, CT.
    Answer
    Dear David, these look to be gouty/horned oak galls that occur on the branches of species of Quercus. They are caused by species of Cynipid wasps. Thank you for sharing these images--I don't see these galls often. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I took this picture on October 7, 2016 in a forest on a basalt ridge in Berlin, CT. The plant grew in a thick patch, about eight feet across.
    Answer
    Dear David, your plant is likely Packera obovate (running groundsel). This native member of the composite family forms colonies of basal leaves like this when it is not in flower. If you get a chance to return, it should produce leafy stems with yellow flower heads at the summit. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi everybody Could you help me to identify this plant? It looks like Echium vulgare (viper's bugloss) but its flowers are yellow.
    Answer
    Aydin, good morning. In order to help you, I would need to know where this plant was photographed. There are over 320,000 species of plants in the world, and the location is very important for narrowing down those choices. If you would provide this information to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I will try to help you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can someone identify this? It was growing in pots with Aloe Vera.
    Answer
    Dear Ginababy, I do not know for certain what species of plant is growing in the pot you have photographed. It may be a species of Kalanchoe (which also go by the common name kalanchoe). There are many species in this primiarly Old World genus, with a lot of variation between the morphology. Sorry I cannot help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Lot's of these in the woods. They appear to be evergreen. Maybe Rubus dalibarda, also known as dewdrop? But Rubus dalibarda is supposed to be rare in Connecticut, and I think I see lots of these. Or how about Viola renifolia, also known as Gray kidney-leaved violet? Links to Google Photos are convenient for me, but maybe you need uploaded images, so I'll try that too. These were next to a fence with woods on one side and a farm on the other side,. https://goo.gl/photos/jhrkBEYz3czomrzG7
    Answer
    Dear David, the plant you have photographed is Alliaria petiolata (garlic-mustard), a non-native and often invasive plant that originated from the Old World. This species is quite common in southern New England and can be found in a variety of primarily forested settings. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I saw this summer a nice stand of rose gentian, Sabatia kennedyana, in Plymouth. Do you know of a reliable seed source for this plant?
    Answer
    Abbeyrose, I'm sorry, I do not. Sabtia kennedyana is a wonderful plant and I can understand why you would want to cultivate it. Members of the Gentianaceae have some difficulties with seed germination that may be limiting their use in the horticulture industry. Best wishes.
  • Question
    If the blackberry is burned,will the roots live and allows germination of blackberries?
    Answer
    Dear guiroyaby, yes, but it would depend on the intensity of the fire. A very hot fire that harmed the underground organs would be capable of killing the plants. However, light fires that removed competition and did not penetrate deep into the ground could be useful for this species. It could also allow space and light for the germination of seed-banked fruits of blackberry. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, my name is Jesse. Next to my driveway, I have four small trees/bushes that grow. I know that two of them are rhododendrons but I'm having trouble identifying the other two. They resemble that of a sweet bay or schip laurel, yet when I look closely at the leaves of my trees/bushes, they look apart from those particular trees/bushes. Also, I live in the Connecticut River Valley [in CT] and I've learned that plants such as Sweet Bays are unable to survive our colder winters.
    Answer
    Dear Artazt, your plant appears to be Ilex glabra (evergreen winterberry). This is a native shrub to the northeast that is also found in the horticultural trade. It will have black berries on the carpellate (i.e., fruit-berring) plants. Best wishes.
  • Question
    20 years ago I was working in Falmouth and my boss gave me a cool plant cutting (it was 4' long at the time). I really doubt it's from Cape Cod, but so far nobody has identified it, and every 5-6 years the lower leaves yellow, it gets too long and I have to cut the stalks. Any thoughts???!! I need to understand how to keep this beauty alive and well.
    Answer
    Dear Scottuhc, your plants looks like a species of Dieffenbachia, a group of plants native (primarily) to South America. These species belong to the Araceae (arum family). Good luck with your care of this plant!