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Questions and Answers

2020

  • Question
    I know this is a goldenrod species but I’m not sure which one. This was collected in Claremont, NH on the forest edge.
    Answer
    Dear gkdermarco, good morning. Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not loading. Please feel free to email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. Attach all the images you have, include the information posted here, and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    I have narrowed this down to be in the persicaria family but am not sure exactly what species this is. It was found in Claremont, NH on the forest edge.
    Answer
    Dear gkdermarco, good morning. Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not loading. Please feel free to email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. Attach all the images you have, include the information posted here, and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    Dear Arthur Haines, On October 3, 2020, we found growing on the wet sands along the shore of Ossipee Lake in Ossipee, NH a four(4) blunt end leaf Galium in fruit. The Galium has the appearance of Galium palustre. Reviewing my image the fruit did not appear smooth, possibly "bumpy", possibly having hair. Can you review my image and help me with the identification? Thank you for your help. Best regards, Yvonne
    Answer
    Dear Von, good afternoon. Go Botany is currently experiencing a technical issue with image uploads. Feel free to attach the images of the Galium and send them to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    This was growing last year in my backwoods and this year they are all over but deers or rabbits are most of them to bare branches. I saved a few protected. The sighting is in Towaco New Jersey, a new location on your map now. I couldn’t upload the pic!
    Answer
    Dear Marj, Go Botany is currently expecting issues related to image uploads. Therefore, I can't see any of the images of the plants in question. You can email them directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have these growing on the edge of my property (under some scotch pines) that I cleared of barberry. They came up on their own. I believe they are guelder rose(viburnum opulus) but unsure if it is the American type or European type. I am in Central Maine. I read you can tell by the shape of the small glands on the leaf stem but after comparing them to photos online Im still unsure which type this is. Unable to load pics
    Answer
    Dear SWH, good morning. Go Botany is currently having difficulties with image uploads. Feel free to email the images of the petiole glands directly to me (ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org) and I'll try to assist you with your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    grass ID photo 2 Hello - I found this grass a week ago in a salt marsh area on the coast of the upper Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island. I don't know what genus it is and if its native but I hadn't seen it before in the area.
    Answer
    Dear marianP, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Go Botany is experiencing an issue that is preventing most people from uploading images. Feel free to send you questions directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so that I may try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    good afternoon i am lover of ivy and grow it everywhere. My english ivy's leaves are getting dark brown patches and tips are getting lazy, mild brownish and ultimately die. Stems sometimes seep red jam like substance, Pleas tell me how to save the plant. The place is Kashmir in Asia. I dont water too much my plants. i maintain the balance.
    Answer
    Dear mirza99, the horticulture department suggested that you read the words on this page (https://pnwhandbooks.org/plantdisease/host-disease/ivy-hedera-helix-bacterial-leaf-spot-stem-canker), which may help you with the issue you are dealing with. Good luck.
  • Question
    I have 3 plants that I had just gotten recently and I’ve noticed in two of them there leaves are browning and the third one started to droop and the stems look weak. I water my plants and give them enough sunlight so I was wondering if I was doing something wrong if you could let me know what I can do to save them?
    Answer
    Dear Adryx4, good morning. I'm sorry that I can't help you with your question. There are too many unknowns, including the species you are writing about and images to assist me with understanding the symptoms. That written, I'm not a plant pathologist, so my assistance will be limited. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Grass ID please. Hello - I found this grass a week ago in a salt marsh area on the coast of the upper Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island. I don't know what genus it is and if its native but I hadn't seen it before in the area.
    Answer
    Dear marianP, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Go Botany is experiencing an issue that is preventing most people from uploading images. Feel free to send you questions directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so that I may try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was wondering if you could help me identify this plant! It is in New Hampshire near Portsmouth. It grows on the edge of a forest and has red a few red berries, serrated leaves. None grow on the main stem as it is spiky.
    Answer
    Dear Mixam213, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Go Botany is experiencing an issue that is preventing most people from uploading images. Feel free to send you questions directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so that I may try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Found this aster in Green-Wood Cemetery recently and wasn't quite sure which Symphiotrichum it was. Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear billythenyguide, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Go Botany is experiencing an issue that is preventing most people from uploading images. Feel free to send you questions directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so that I may try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Symphyotrichum #2 - basal leaves heart shaped, serrated, middle stem leaves long and lanceolate, upper leaves small sessile entire, many small leaves and bracts, phyllaries dark green somewhat diamond shaped, slightly spreading, flowers light blue, up to 1”, but not larger.
    Answer
    Dear Kristinkwest, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Go Botany is experiencing an issue that is preventing most people from uploading images. Feel free to send you questions directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so that I may try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have 2 Symphyotrichum species that I’m struggling to identify. They have some characteristics of one plant, but then others don’t fit. I’m beginning to think they maybe be natural hybrids. I will post them separately. First - basal leaves heart shaped, middle leaves winged petiole not clasping, Leaves rough upper, smooth underside, serrated, phyllaries ½ dark green and compressed, flowers just over 1” and light blue. Drummond’s Aster is close, but flowers too large and leaves smooth on under.
    Answer
    Dear Kristinkwest, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Go Botany is experiencing an issue that is preventing most people from uploading images. Feel free to send you questions directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so that I may try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I photographed Fuller’s Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) on August 6th in a vacant lot in Kittery Township, York County, Maine. The identification was confirmed by a botanist with the Maine Natural Areas Program. However, this species is not currently recorded from Maine in Go Botany (nor the USDA PLANTS database). Can this record be added? I can provide more information, including a photo.
    Answer
    Dear JVCalhoun, good morning. It would be great to learn more about this occurrence you have discovered. Please email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and attach images. I would really appreciate learning about the setting so we can determine if it was truly naturalized. Thank you and best wishes.
  • Question
    I found a Brassica oleracea in Maine
    Answer
    Dear Paytyn, good morning. If you want to email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and attach images of this plant, I would be appreciative to learn more about it. Please describe the setting and whether or not you feel it is truly naturalized. Thank you and best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, this (I assume) seed floated down onto me a week or so ago. Can you identify it? I'm using it as a "mystery object" with my students next week and would love to be able to tell them more than "it's some kind of seed." Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear bbrown, there is no image associated with your question. If you are having difficulty uploading images, please feel free to email me directly at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. I will be happy to try to help identify images you attach to the email.
  • Question
    I have been given an ID for this Goldenrod as Solidago Subsect. Argutae, which is a subgrouping of species similar to S, arguta. Can you explain what a "Subsection" is, as opposed to a subgenus, a species group, or a super species? Also, if you recognize the group, which are the other Solidago species in it? The observation was made in Franconia Notch. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Chaffeemonell, good morning. We've discussed in another place what all those taxonomic ranks are. Within New England, there are only two species placed within subsection Argutae, Solidago arguta and S. patula. The former is a forest and edge species and latter is a wetland species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This flower was found on the edge of a forest path within 15-20 feet of the Stillwater River. The trees are mostly conifers with some red maple and white birch. The plant has opposite leaves that are toothed and simple. They are mostly heart-shaped, except that the base of the leaf is flat, not curved. The flowers are in umbels coming from leaf axils with each flower having 5 petals. The color is white. It was leaning over into the trail, but would estimate that it was about 2 to 2.5 feet tall.
    Answer
    Dear GMartha, Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not uploading. Feel free to send images directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    I have an invasive plant in my yard; it looks like a tree but spreads via underground runners. It has small white flowers in spring over bright green leaves. It is 12-15' tall with elongated leaves along thin branches. Bark is smooth and slightly striated; trunk only gets about 1" thick. The runners are quite thick and run very deep - deeper than locust runners. These cannot easily be pulled by hand.
    Answer
    Dear kblossfeld, Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not uploading. Feel free to send images directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    I found this plant in our creek bed in southern Indiana. I have never seen another like it on our 150 acres. It developed an elongated cluster of green berries below the leaves. It was about 18 inches high. No flowers ever. It is now wilted (September) and the berry cluster is turning red. Please help identify. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Betsy, Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not uploading. Feel free to send images directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    Arthur, I am having trouble uploading pictures, for your ID help, just trying to verify if the problem is on my end or yours. - B. Piper
    Answer
    Dear Bruce, yes, Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not uploading. Feel free to send images directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    I'm trying to figure out the various highbush blueberries (and maleberries?) Is this beautiful leaf enough to go on? Taken at Nickerson State Park in Brewster, MA 8/30/20. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear corylus, good afternoon. Two ways to identify these genera apart involve examining the branchlet surfaces and winter buds. Those of Vaccinium (blueberry) have +/- white bumps (papillae) on the branchlet surfaces and have multiple, imbricate scales covering the winter buds. Those of Lyonia (maleberry) have no papillae on the branchlet surfaces and have two valvate buds scales covering the winter buds.
  • Question
    In Lebanon, NH. I've used a plant identification app and it has told me that it is many different things. Closest to it is the White Snakeroot but this plant has alternating leaves. I believe it will have white flowers but nothing yet. Ranges from 1 to 4 feet tall, most are 3 foot in height. Grows primarily in semi-shade in among my other flowers. Uploading isn't working so I will send the images to an email address.
    Answer
    Dear wmrlynn, we corresponded recently about this question. If you are having trouble uploading images, never hesitate to email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. I am happy to assist with any plant-related questions you have. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please help me narrow down ID of this sedge. I can't find any way to narrow down the search to these 2 key things (which I'm sure will go a long way toward ID): 1. The plant is very small - only 2-6 inches tall in full flower, and 2. It only has 1 leaf from the base; it does not have a clump of leaves or in fact any noticeable leaves that differentiate it from the surrounding grass. I have had yellow nutsedge & this plant is COMPLETELY different. Growing in ave. soil, not wet/moist.
    Answer
    Dear nh, Good afternoon. I'm sorry, but there are no images associated with your question. Without images, I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble uploading pictures, feel free to email them directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    I'd like to know what this plant is that I saw on the Salamander trail of Mount Warner.
    Answer
    Dear cwhitehair, Good afternoon. I'm sorry, but there are no images associated with your question. Without images, I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble uploading pictures, feel free to email them directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    I think this plant is Water Smartweed (Persicaria amphibia) though it doesn't look quite like the other photos I have seen. It is located on a brook (slow-moving water) right along the edge. The water was actually drained until just a few days ago due to dam repairs downstream. So while the plant itself was not touching the water it likely was previously.
    Answer
    Good afternoon. I'm sorry, but there are no images associated with your question. Without images, I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble uploading pictures, feel free to email them directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    I believe that my photo is of a Persicaria amphibia (Water Smartweed) but It doesn’t look quite like the other pictures I’ve seen. It was right on the edge of a brook with slow moving water. In fact the water was drained until a few days ago because of work on the dam down stream. So the plant itself was not touching the water but likely was previously.
    Answer
    Dear OliveBrown, Good afternoon. I'm sorry, but there are no images associated with your question. Without images, I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble uploading pictures, feel free to email them directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    I found this flower on the edge of a parking lot by a tidal river. It was in waste space along with butter and eggs flowers -- lots of both. This flower is bilateral, pink with a short stem. The leaves are toothed, alternate, have hairs, and are lance shaped. The leaves and flowers are intermingled as they ascend the stem. Overall height is about 18-20 inches =/-. Attached are the photos I have. I have tried Newcomb's, the simple goBotany key and Wild Flowers of New England. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear GMartha, you've photographed Odontites vulgaris (red false bartsia), formerly known by the name Odontites vernus. It is a non-native plant in the Orobanchaceae. It is also a hemi-parasite (i.e., it produces chlorophyll but also parasitizes other species of plants). Very nice photographs and beautiful plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is the plant with burrs (large leaves in back were a cucumber)? The flowers were white, five petals, resembled raspberry. The leaves are furry and toothed like a raspberry. Thornless. Came up at the edge of my suburban MA garden. Is it invasive? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear rjleong, good afternoon. You have photographed a species of Geum (common name: avens), a member of the rose family. I can't tell you which species of Geum from the single image provided. If you want to supply additional images of the fruits and leaves, I might be able to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I think this is a cherry, but someone else suggested it's a birch. Can you tell me? The bark is brown and spotted.
    Answer
    Dear Madelein89, Good afternoon. I'm sorry, but there are no images associated with your question. Without images, I won't be able to help. If you are having trouble uploading pictures, feel free to email them directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    This plant had five-petalled white flowers, similar to raspberry flowers. No noticeable scent. The leaves are fuzzy and toothed like a raspberry's, but this ain't no raspberry. Thornless. Found next to my suburban garden this year. The larger leaves in the photo are a cucmber; couldn't figure out how to crop the photo. Is it invasive?
    Answer
    Dear rjleong, good afternoon. You've photographed a species of avens (genus Geum), a member of the rose family. I can't tell you which species you've photographed without more images, including closer ones of the leaves and of the fruits. If you want to email images directly to me, feel free (ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org), otherwise, I hope knowing the genus is useful to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr :) I have tentatively identified a local aster as Eurybia macrophylla. The distinctive features noted include a glabrous stem, basal leaves heart-shaped, intermediate leaves are winged obovate, phyllaries are rounded and ciliated, and the inflorescence appears corymbiform. Also, the pedicels are glabrous and each are subtended by a leaf. I would appreciate your assessment. Thank you, Edward
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good afternoon. If you are seeing glabrous peduncles (i.e., no tiny stipitate glands), then it won't be Eurybia macrophylla. You need to look for them with around 15X magnification. That species also usually has light blue (or at least blue-tinged ray flowers). You may have Eurybia scherberi instead. It is less common than Eurybia macrophylla. I hope this assists with your identification.
  • Question
    This poplar seeded itself right at the foundation wall of my house. Should I kill it, or is it worth transplanting?
    Answer
    Dear Madeleine89, identifying poplar seedlings is nearly impossible without having the specimens in hand to examine the morphological characters. It may be an eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), but that is just an educated guess. I'm sorry I can't be more helpful in this case.
  • Question
    Volunteer in urban planting strip in Watertown MA. Leaves a wrinkly heart shape. Purple flowers on a ~15” stalk. See photos. Substantial meaty roots (no pic).
    Answer
    Dear LibbyShaw, you have photographed a species of bellflower (genus Campanula). However, I can't tell for certain which species you have photographed. I am unable to see details of the flowers clearly enough for me to make a determination. If you have additional images, feel free to send them directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to help you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I would like to find out what this plant is.
    Answer
    Dear Archerjax, good morning. You appear to have photographed a species of Eutrochium (Joe-pye-weed), members of the composite family. I don't know where the image was taken, so it is hard for me to provide much more detail than this. Location is very important for identification (along with habitat information). I hope knowing the genus is helpful to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    On the entry path to Hebron Town Forest, which takes you through a field of sorts, I found this alternate leaved shrub. I generally don't concern myself with non-natives, but can you tell me what this is? Is this Cotinus coggygria? If so, it isn't listed for Grafton Co, NH on your site.
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, good morning. Yes, those do look like the leaves of Cotinus coggygria. Do you feel this is an intentional planting or an escape that has made its way to this location without being planted? Please email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so that I can confirm this as a naturalized plant and add the respective county to the Go Botany maps. Thank you.
  • Question
    I have mats of this growing around my house. It likes to spread out onto patio stones and pavement. Is it Euphorbia maculata?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, yes, it does look like Euphorbia maculata. This is one of the more common species of sandmat in New England. They usually have red to purple blotches on the leaves, but this is not a constant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I have a question regarding the key for Fabaceae. At question 22, it asks whether the leaves are paripinnate or imparipinnate. In the key, Chamaecrista is imparipinnate (has a terminal leaflet). However, in all of the pictures on the website, the leaves appear to lack a terminal leaflet. Is there something I'm missing here?
    Answer
    Dear SigFig, There was an error in the key, and Chamaecrista should be included under 22a with the species that are parapinnate. It is distinguished from species in 22a by the distinct (not fused) stamens, distinct sepals, resupinate flowers, and evident petiolar gland (not found in the other species of that lead). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is growing like made through the lawn, there is some underneath the conifers. No idea what it is, came up reasonably easily when scarified but grown back really quickly, Any idea what it is and how to get rid of it from the lawn.
    Answer
    Dear robbins885, there are not images associated with your question. Without them, I cannot assist. Feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org, I will be happy to try to assist. Please include the state they were photographed in.
  • Question
    Hi, Go Botany does not seem to a Mentha species I found here in Putney Vermont. My photo for some reason is not loading. Would you send me an email so I can send directly? Any ideas? Grows in wet ditches a couple of feet tall. Lavendar/white dense terminal spikes of flowers. Hairy leaves and stems, no leaf petioles present.
    Answer
    Der rgrumbine, you are welcome to end the images you have to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist you. Looking forward to examining the images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm trying to distinguish between flatsedges now, and I find it frustrating. Any overall tips on how to go about it and what characteristics to feature in photos? Here is one, for example, from Sandy Point, Plum Island. What say you? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, good afternoon. With members of the genus Cyperus, you must have a way to examine all the small structures and interpret them. You have to be able to understand what you are looking at. Flatsedges are notoriously difficult from images. I can't see features such as the achenes (including their outline, size, and number of angles), and so on. Without that information, I can't assist you (except for some very distinctive species). I can examine specimens of these plants and help you that way (if that is of interest). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Goldenrod in Dutchess County NY, similar to Solidago gigantea, but leaves are far larger (on average between 6 and 8" long, and 1 and 2" wide), have only one prominent vein, are nearly glabrous (I counted six hairs on the veins on one leaf), and of a sample of leaves from 14 plants, this had an average of 12.4 teeth, while S. gigantea had an average of 19.5. Plants are clonal and lack basal leaves. Flowering full three weeks later than S. gigantea. Seems to grow only in and around streams.
    Answer
    Joshuaharkness, the short answer is: I can't identify the goldenrod from the information provided. I would need to see the involucral bracts and have a measurement of the length, and have a better idea of the number and size of disk and ray flowers. If you would like to send a specimen to me, feel free to email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and we can get this species identified for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found these Joe-pye Weeds at the shore of the 2nd pond in the Three Ponds Area of the WMNF in NH. I'm trying to identify the species. These plants were about 30 inches high and had purple stems. Are their height (short for Eutrochium) and the purple stem diagnostic? Note what appears to be flower buds at the axil between stem and leaf about half way up the plant. Is this diagnostic of species?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, these plants appear to be Eutrochium maculatum (spotted Joe-pye-weed). The stem coloration nor the height is diagnostic. These plants occasionally have green stems with red to purple spots, but sometimes the background color becomes completely suffused with purple. Likewise, the plants can be very short in some situations (especially exposed lake/pond shores). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This tall (about 4') plant was photographed on a dry site along an old forest road in Cockermouth Forest in Groton NH. Each tiny (less than 1/4") white flower has 5 petals. Can you identify the species?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, yes, I can help you. This plant is Agertina altissima (white snakeroot), a native member of the composite family. It typically inhabits moderately to very rich, sometimes rocky, deciduous forests. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I think I have a oleander plant and I know it is toxic and should not burn the wood, could you please have a look at the pictures to identify the plant. Thankyou
    Answer
    Sarah-jane, good morning. Yes, these do look like Nerium oleander (oleander), a member of the dogbane family. They are very beautiful, thank you for sharing the images.
  • Question
    Hello, If you can, please confirm the id of this tree growing 15’ in S. CT. Based on the white fuzz above the leaf scar, the compound leaf, I am almost certain that this is Juglans cinerea. This was observed in a dry upland forested area.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, there is no image attached to this question. Without one, I will not be able to assist. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email. My email address is ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is causing my shrubs to die?
    Answer
    Dear demag007, I have no idea. You have not provided with any information, such as: what species are the shrubs, what symptoms are you observing, how old are the shrubs, what has the weather been like this year, where are shrubs growing, etc. Without this information, I can't help you. Sorry.
  • Question
    I found this along the Peshtigho River just below Johnson Falls Dam.
    Answer
    Dear Mehackett, good afternoon. There is no image associated with your post here. Without one, I won't be able to assist. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to help.
  • Question
    I found a volunteer Rhexia Virginica next to a small lake in NE CT
    Answer
    Dear Msheardwright, good afternoon. Beautiful plant and wonderful image. Thank you for sharing your discovery here. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Dear Ace Botanist, this 2-foot tall, hairy plant is a weed in my Dampish yard, woods of the north Quabbin, MA, grows in shade, along with the jewelweed. Can you please identify?
    Answer
    Dear tracy, I'm sorry, I cannot. There is no image associated with your question. Without one, I can't assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, please attach them to an email and mail them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try my best to assist.
  • Question
    Hello! I emailed photos of this milkweed to a native plant association; they suggested I email them to you to see if it may be purple milkweed. It was purchased at a native plant sale in 2017 as swamp milkweed, but looks very different from the other swamp milkweed purchased at the same time. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear MA_Hiker, good afternoon. You've photographed what looks like Asclepias incarnata var. pulchra, which is a very hairy form of swamp milkweed. This is not purple milkweed (Asclepias purpurescens) because the horns are long-exserted from the hoods of the corona (purple milkweed would have hoods about equal in length to the horns). I hope this is helpful. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm stumped on this one. This flower is growing in the Kenduskeag Stream, Bangor, Maine-- shallow at this time of year. It's about 3 feet high, seems to have only a basal leaf. The stem is round and smooth. There are 6 petals with the style a deep raspberry color. Because there are 6 style on each flower, it seems that there are also 6 petals, although 3 look somewhat different in shape than the other 3. Thanks for the help.
    Answer
    Dear GMartha, good morning. You've photographed Butomus umbellatus (flowering-rush), a non-native member of the flowering-rush family. This species can be problematic in some settings. This species has been documented in Penobscot County, ME, previously. Your sighting is an important one for keeping track of the spread of this species in Maine. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I found this twin betel leaf in my garden this morning. I surfed the net, but could not find any related image or article. So I assume this is a rare plant growth. I have done my Masters in Botony and hence much more curious to understand the science behind its creation. How did it get joined ?
    Answer
    Dear srinidas, there is no image associated with your question. Without one, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to me directly at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this along the Peshtigho River just below Johnson Falls Dam.
    Answer
    Dear Mehackett, good afternoon. You have photographed a species of Goodyear, and most likely Goodyera pubescens (downy rattlesnake-plantain), a native member of the orchid family. This species is infrequently found in a variety of mesic to dry-mesic forests, often associated with oak. The leaves of the different species have varying degrees of white patterns upon them. Beautiful plant.
  • Question
    I have these growing in disturbed areas around my house in Massachusetts. The tallest are over 2 meters. I was thinking Artemisia, but if it is I can't figure out which species.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, this is Artemisia vulgaris (common wormwood) again. This is the upper part of the stem where the leaves tend to have fewer divisions than lower on the stem. Again, you should find leaves with a dense coating of white-gray hairs on the lower surface and aromatic foliage (to help confirm the identification). Best wishes.
  • Question
    We saw this plant yesterday on the Powwow River in South Hampton, NH. I do not see it recoded in our county. I thought I should record the sighting here.
    Answer
    Dear evyn, you have photographed Bidens beckii (Beck's beggar-ticks). This is an aquatic species of beggar-ticks that has divided submersed leaves that look very different from most members of the genus (which are terrestrial and wetland species primarily). Beautiful image.
  • Question
    I have a dense stand of this growing in a sunny spot near my house in Massachusetts, crowding out other plants. I was thinking one of the weedy Artemisia or Ambrosia. There are no flowers yet.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good afternoon. You have photographed Artemisia vulgaris (common wormwood), a member of the composite family. The leaves will be white-gray beneath with a dense layer of hairs and the foliage will be aromatic. This species has a lot of traditional uses in the herbal realm. I hope you are well.
  • Question
    Found this on road side in Mass. Has green little fruits. Twig from what kind of tree/shrub?
    Answer
    Dear Howard, it looks like you have photographed Ilex verticillata (common winterberry), a native member of the holly family. It is most often found in wetlands and along shorelines (including the edges and within vernal pools). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant is growing in Malden, MA. Pretty sure it's a hawkweed, but would love to know what kind for my curiosity's sake. Thanks for any help! :)
    Answer
    Dear Erin_MA, good morning. You have collected (mostly likely) either Hieracium kalmii (Canada hawkweed) or Hieracium sabaoudum (Savoy hawkweed). The former is native the latter is non-native. I would need additional to tell you which species you have for certain (such as a mature plant with a full view of all the flowers heads on the plant). I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Hello- new to the plant world. This plant is in my wooded back yard. Brunswick, Maine. Area is surrounded by blackberry bushes. Sunny along a cleared path. This plant is tall 5 feet or so, prickly green stems. I was concerned that it might be hemlock and that i should destroy it. Please help in the ID. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Sarah, good morning. You've photographed Eupatorium perfoliatum (boneset thoroughwort). This is a native member of the composite family with leaves that are fused at the base to provide the illusion that the stem pierces through the leaves. This plant is visited by native pollinators. Best wishes.
  • Question
    In a sunny spot next to a busy trail in Lincoln, Massachusetts. Is it Euphorbia? The leaves are not quite opposite but it goes much better in the opposite key than the alternate key. The flower anatomy confuses me. Are the two large triangular leaves considered bracts?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good afternoon. Yes, you have photographed a species of Euphorbia. It looks like a species in the E. esula complex. I can't determine the leaf widths, so I can't be certain you don't have Euphorbia cyparisius or its hybrid with E. esula. Hopefully knowing the group will get you started on your study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm a novelist conducting research for an upcoming book. I need to find a plant or tree that is native to both northern Russia and southern South America from which sap could be extracted that could act as a slow-burning but high temperature fuse. If such a tree does not exist, I would like to create a fictional tree with those properties. If anyone here can help, I would greatly appreciate any information you are willing to provide. Feel free to email me at Cap@CapDaniels.com if you would like.
    Answer
    Dear CapDaniels, good afternoon. You aren't likely to find species that occur in the regions you've specified--that isn't a likely native range scenario. There are others, such as eastern North America and western Asia, that are well-documented to have closely related species occurring in both regions. I think you are going to need to fabricate a species for this one. Good luck.
  • Question
    Can you confirm this is Lobelia siphilitica? It has been growing widely as a volunteer in my Lexington MA woodland garden for many years. I gather from this site that the species is rare in eastern MA. Pictures taken 8/2/2020. coming into bloom.
    Answer
    Dear bkatzenberg, good afternoon. The plants certainly look like Lobelia siphilitica. This plant is often included in various seed mixes and shows up in expected and unexpected places. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I would love your help with this one, please. It has stumped the Native Plants of New England Facebook group, which is a rare thing. It's rooted in my pebbly, 4-seasons brook in Windsor NH. It was completely submerged. These photos taken with submersible camera on May 31, 2020 No flowers or fruits observed. Photos attached Thank you, Laura Costello ljcost@gmail.com
    Answer
    Dear ljcost, good morning. I can't be certain--but if you get back to this area, unearth a little of the soil around the underground storage organ. This plant likely has a large rhizome that would confirm it as a species of Nuphar (pond-lily). The leaves do appear like the submersed ones of this genus. Without the rhizome, I won't be able to be certain.
  • Question
    I saw this yesterday on the bank of the Green River in Colrain MA. It about 36” talk.
    Answer
    Dear Cathyo2, you have photographed a species of Heracleum (cow-parsnip), which is a member of the celery family. I can't see the features I need to in order to identify the exact species. Hopefully, knowing the genus will be useful and get you started on your study of this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is coming up from under a rock near my house in Massachusetts. When I first saw it I thought it was Japanese knotweed, which used to cover the area, but now that it has grown larger it looks different.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. From these images, I'm not able to assist (yet). I think we are going to need reproductive material. Sorry I can't help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A patch of roadside Persicaria I asked about before now has flowers. Are they enough to ID it? In addition to the main group of flowers there is a much smaller group, only two in one case, lower on the stem. Lincoln, Massachusetts July 27, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, from what I can tell from the images, these are very close to Persicaria extremiorientalis. What I need is an image of the peduncles (stalks to the flowering arrays) and stem so that I can see the presence and orientation of hairs. Feel free to email them directly to me if it is easier.
  • Question
    Hello, I would appreciate an ID on this Marsh plant. It is in Salem Sound, Salem. Thank you very much! SueLB
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, you have photographed Erechtities hieraciifolius (American burnweed). This is a native member of the composite family. There are two varieties of this plant, one of which is relatively rare and restricted to coastal habitats (megalocarpus), the other of which is common and wide ranging (hieraciifolius). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this Coeloglossum viride? Habitat limestone outcrop in woods NW CT with Asplenium trichomanes & Asplenium platyneuron. Phot 7/14/20
    Answer
    Dear James, good morning to you. You have photographed Epipactis helleborine (broad-leaved helleborine). This is a non-native orchid that is found here and there over much of New England. It is not invasive. It typically is found in a variety of forested habitats and forest edges.
  • Question
    I found this strange plant growing in an unused pot, I cannot see anything similar on the web Please help me to identify it.
    Answer
    Dear Lorraine, good morning. You appear to have photographed a species of liverwort. I do not have expertise in bryophytes, so I can't provide much more information than that. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi Arthur, A friend sent me this photo from her property on the Piscataquis River in Howland. We'd appreciate any help you can give on this one. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear JDE, good morning. This looks like a gall near the summit of the stem, but I don't recognize this gall. I would need more images of the plants stems and leaves to determine who it is--which would then allow us to identify the species causing the gall. Sorry I can't be of more assistance.
  • Question
    Is this Japanese pachysandra (Pachysandra terminalis)? This picture was taken along Market St. in Warren, RI.
    Answer
    Dear aduryea, good morning. You have photographed a species of mountain-spurge (pachysandra), but I can't tell you with confidence which species without flowers/fruits. Perhaps you can try to acquire images of the reproductive stems when/if they flower. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Admittedly, this verges on being a silly question... Has anyone ever estimated how many cells there are in a giant sequoia tree? I've read there are an estimated four quadrillion cells in Blue Whales, and was wondering how that stacked up against our largest trees. Feel free to dismiss this as meaningless, although any thoughts you might have would be much appreciated. Cheers, SG
    Answer
    Dear stephengraves, the short answer is--I don't know. I have seen estimates, ranging from 500,000 to 200,000,000. The former measurement was for living cells (and most of the trunk of a tree consists of non-living, structural cells). So, the latter estimate might be closer to reality for an average-sized tree. Perhaps we could multiply this number by some factor to get at the number of cells in a giant sequoia tree. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Roadside in woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts, blooming in the past week or two.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, this plant is Apocynum androsaemifolium (spreading dogbane). The hanging flowers that are pink or white with pink stripes and with prominently spreading lobes are good characteristics for this species. If you find a large enough colony, you can locate the opal beetle (also called dogbane beetle) on this plant during July (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chrysochus_auratus_-_Dogbane_Beetle_(6881287554).jpg). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have these growing in my yard this year. The largest one attracts a lot of ants. I included a picture of one feeding on what seems to be an extra-floral nectary. The stem has spines at the nodes. The leaves have an even number of leaflets -- a pair at the tip.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. You have photographed a species of Chamaecrista (sensitive-pea), in the Fabaceae. I can't see the extra-floral nectary well because of the position of the ant, but I think you likely have Chamaecrista fasciculata (partridge sensitive-pea). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this a hybrid of Dryopteris marginalis? Canterbury NH in a very small mesic old sugar bush with ash, hemlock, Aralia racemosa, Sambucus racemosa, Christmas fern.
    Answer
    Dear NativeArt, the plant you have photographed looks to be Dryopteris marginalis (marginal wood fern). I don't see any evidence of hybridization in the nice photographs you have shared. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Seeking ID of the pictures plant (sedge?) observed in Seattle municipal park.
    Answer
    Dear Robert, good morning to you. I'm sorry I can't assist you. I don't recognize this plant, though it looks like a tricolpate (a flowering plant with two seed leaves). It reminds me of a species of Plantago, but you are far out of my range of expertise. If you need assistance finding botanists closer to you, please let me know and I will assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Spotted this in a wooded section of our yard in West Simsbury, CT. Is it a Trillium? I didn't notice it earlier, so I don't know what color the flower was.
    Answer
    Dear mkrjcik, good morning. I do not know for certain who your plant is (but I can share it is not a species of Trillium). I need images taken from different angles to help you best. The plant may be a seedling of Epipactis helleborine. If so, it may flower soon. If it does, please post another image so I can assist you.
  • Question
    Does anyone know what this is? It has fuzzy stems, purplish undersides on the leaves. Found in NH.
    Answer
    Dear honeycloverwine, good morning. The plant looks to be cultivated. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Cultivated species, unfortunately, are outside of my region of expertise. I'm sorry I can't assist you.
  • Question
    Flower coming out of shallow water at the edge of a pond in Lincoln, Massachusetts.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed a species of Sparganium (bur-reed; Typhaceae). While not a large genus, there is a diversity of species as to their aquatic form (e.g., erect emergents, floating-leaved plants). I can't tell you which species you've photographed without additional images of the leaves and inflorescence. Hopefully knowing the genus will get you started on your study.
  • Question
    I'm having a hard time identifying this plant found on the rivers edge (in the floodplain area) in Orono, Penobscot County, Maine. The flowers are on a slender spike. They seem to be irregular, but could be 4 petals. The leaves are coarsely toothed, lance shaped, and alternate. I have tried Newcomb's but came to a deadend; clearly not doing something right. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear GMartha, good morning. You have photographed what appears to be Veronica longifolia (long-leaved speedwell), a species that is frequently cultivated and sometimes escapes into the surrounding landscape. This genus has four petals, the upper is slightly larger than the lower one, so the flowers are just barely zygomorphic (i.e., bilaterally symmetrical). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have this growing in my yard in Massachusetts. Is it Trifolium aureum?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have certainly photographed a member of the "hop clovers" (Trifolium aureum, T. campestre, T. dubium). However, I can't see the petiolules (stalks to the leaflets) well enough to assist you. Assuming the stalk to the terminal (middle) leaflet is the same length as though that support the two lateral leaflets, you have Trifolium aureum. You can also measure flower size to assist with the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, My name is Marcus Brown and I am a researcher for the game show "Jeopardy!" - We are working on a botany category and I was wondering if I could email you a few photos to help us identify some plants. Any discretionary help would be greatly appreciated and thank you, Marcus
    Answer
    Marcus, good morning. Feel free to email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org, I am happy to try to help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you tell me the pollinator for Pyrularia pubera: common names buffalo nut or oil nut. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear sissona, good morning. Pyrularia pubera is a species of the southern Appalachian Mountains, an area that is outside my region of expertise. You might want to contact botanists at Chapel Hill (North Carolina) or some location closer to the core of this species range. If you need assistance locating folks, let me know and I will be happy to help.
  • Question
    I treasure a smoke shrub that was planted about 20 years ago, and recently noticed another similar but much smaller one about a hundred yards away in a wild part of the garden.leaves identical as far as I can observe, but are alternate on the twigs, whereas the original 10ft shrub has clusters of 5 0r 6 opposing leaves on short branches. Please explain. Deep River, Ontario.
    Answer
    Dear JohnWHiborn, goof afternoon. I can't assist you with your question without seeing images. If we are discussing the same plant--Cotinus coggygria (smoke tree, a member of the Anacardiaceae), this is a species with alternate leaves. Why you would have one with opposite leaves I can't answer without an image to identify the cause. Sorry I cannot assist you.
  • Question
    I took this photo of a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth on a purple fringed orchid. The question is, is it P. psycodes or P. grandiflora? I saw several examples of this plant on the edge of the trail into Greeley Ponds in the WMNF in NH. All of them were 2 feet or less in height. Is there something I should look for in the future to discern P. psycodes from P. grandiflora?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, good afternoon. Based on the round orifice to the spur and the forward directed rostellum lobes, this looks like Platanthera grandiflora (greater purple-fringed bog-orchid). Beautiful image, thank you for sharing.
  • Question
    Hello there, At an earlier date I had submitted 4 of these photos to you on this Sedge? plant. At that time seeds hadn't developed. Due to this it was impossible to ID the species. I am hoping this can be done now! Thank you much, SueLB
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, good morning. You have photographed what appears to be a species of Bromus (brome grass). This is a large and difficult genus, hard to identify from images due to the necessity of some detailed measurements. Hopefully knowing the genus will be useful to you and, perhaps, start your study of this plant.
  • Question
    Wondering what kind of plant this is?
    Answer
    Dear Rmssyr, good morning. You have photographed Echinops sphaerocephalus (globe-thistle), a member of the composite family. The spherical flower heads of blue, tubular flowers is a good distinguishing feature for this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    There are at least a hundred of these stems shady part of yard, in partial shade. The blooms showing are from early June. There are no fruits or seeds visible in mid-July. I believe I saw this at Garden in the Woods, but it wasn't labeled. The height is about 1 foot and is interspersed with Virginia creeper and growing under white pines.
    Answer
    Dear bkatzenberg, you have photographed Aralia nudicaulis (wild sarsaparilla), a native member of the celery family. This plant is adapted to living on the forest floor and produces a level array of leaflets to gather sun (i.e., the leaves aren't at different levels shading themselves). It is a shrub, but the woody portion of the plant is at or below the ground level. Note that the flowers are produced on a separate, leafless stem.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr I have a sedge growing in a very dry section of my property. Previous discussions led to an id of C vulpinoidea. The inflorescence of my sedge appears to be more consistent with C cephalophora. The inflorescence has consistently measure 1.5 - 2 cm, the culms are always longer than the blades, and the sheath is smooth. The capellate scale however, appears to be longer than the scales associated with C cephalophora. Hopefully, the images with bring clarity. Thank you in advance
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good morning. As I recall from earlier images, the inflorescences were compound (i.e., two or more spikes were produced from some nodes). If my recollection is correct, this can't be Care cephalophora (which has nodes with solitary spikes). We may have reached the limit of what we can do via images. I'm guessing that to derive a confident answer, I will need to see the specimen. If you are interested in mailing it to me, feel free to contact me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org.
  • Question
    I think this is Potamogeton vaseyi. Am I correct? Am I allowed to post this? I believe it is rare in Manie. I have seen it a few times in recent years, while out surveying for invasive aquatic plants. This one, I found yesterday, very near my home. Torsey Lake (or Pond), Readfield, Maine.
    Answer
    Dear SDonaldson, good morning. Beautiful images! You have photographed Persicaria amphibia (water smartweed), a native aquatic plant that produces the beautiful array of flowers held above the surface of the water. It has an amphibious form when it is stranded on the shore during low water events. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I recently found this plant in my backyard (Middlesex VT), mostly shaded area without grass, somewhat sandy soil. Moss also grows near it. I’ve tried searching online and can not find it! I would love to know what it is and any other info about it! Thanks so much!
    Answer
    Dear Lynsrose92, good morning. It looks like you have photographed Pilea pumila (Canada clearweed). This is a member of the stinging-nettle family that does not have stinging hairs. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I have received this plant along with the venus fly trap I purchased. I am unable to identify it and the venus fly trap was meant to be sold alone. It seems to be growing well in the same peet moss and sand that the venus fly trap is in. Can you please help me identify this plant and let me know if it need any specialized care?
    Answer
    DearDboverie, good evening. I'm sorry that I can't help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. You might have success getting on a carnivorous plant forum--those folks may know who is growing with your Dionaea. Good luck!
  • Question
    My aunt has a growth on her spruce. Can anyone help identify it?
    Answer
    Dear Drew, good afternoon. It looks like you have photographed the yellow spruce gall aphid. If you examine images online of this aphid, you will note the similarity. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I would love to know what kind of plant this is! Thank you
    Answer
    Dear kc9157, good afternoon. I cannot (unfortunately) help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Cultivated plants and species from outside this region may be outside my region of expertise. I wish I could assist you more, but would need to direct you to someone in your region. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This grass is growing in the yard around my house. I don't know if it's a wild or cultivated species -- it came with the house.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, the grass you have photographed looks like it may be a member of the genus Poa (bluegrass). Most of the species that occur in New England have arachnoid (cobwebby) hairs at the base of the individual florets. So, it you dismantle the spikelets, you can see the hairs with low magnification. Without a specimen, I wouldn't be able to go much further with confidence.
  • Question
    Forest edge, Lincoln, Massachusetts. Is it Carex lurida?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, it does look like Carex lurida. That species is the most common of the three that resemble each other (C. lurida, C. baileyi, C. hystericina). Carex lurida has very plump perigynium bodies and relatively broad leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Between road and woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts. It looks like a Persicaria but it's not one I recognize and it has no flowers yet. I was considering Persicaria virginiana since I've been told it grows in this town, but it may not be identifiable at this stage.
    Answer
    Der jfc, you are correct that you have photographed a species of Persicaria. It is not likely Persicaria virginiana, that species often has red mottles on the leaves and has broader leaves (the length to width ratio is much lower than the ones you have pictured). We will need to wait for flowers, unfortunately. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, This Rush? plant and many more are growing in a dry field, in Salem Sound, Massachusetts. I would appreciate any information you are able to share with me concerning this plant! Thank You, SueLB
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, you have photographed Juncus greenei (Greene's rush), an uncommon (but, by no means rare) rush. It is most commonly found on dry, sterile soils (such as in sandy fields, railroad embankments, etc.). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm unsure as to what this plant(?) is. Could you help me identify it? The inside appeared to be white. Also very sorry if this was sent twice, as when I submitted this the first time the page had an error so I'm not sure if I sent this question or not. Thank you so much!
    Answer
    Dear Diya_Shah, I'm sorry I cannot help you. I am unable to see enough of the plant and I do not know where the plant hails from. Location information is very important for the identification process. Keep in mind (please) that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern United States). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Are there species of Aconitum growing wild around Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts that you know of? I grow some in my garden, but this plant was about a mile away so I know it isn't from my seeds.
    Answer
    Dear Aconitum@Grower, there are species of Aconitum that grow in the western part of the MA, but they have not necessarily been observed growing wild in Hampden County. Aconitum napellus, for example, is known from Berkshire and Worcester Counties as growing outside of cultivation. I hope this helps. Best wishes.
  • Question
    New Haven, CT, July 12, 2020 Working with daughter in her yard here; we found this but can only find Sherardia arvensis for closest ID. Wrong, right? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear meeyauw@gmail.com, good morning. I'm not confident the images of the leaves and flowers are the same plant. The leafy colony reminds me of Oreganum vulgare (oregano). The small white flower is a member of the Lamiaceae (mint family), note that it is bilaterally symmetrical with an upper and lower lip (Sherardia arvensis is radially symmetrical). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi there! I DON’T Have a photo of the plant..I actually had a question Regarding one- I’m a Connecticut Native (Barkhamsted) and have a (very protected, secluded and locked) little apothecary garden as a hobby, and I’ve been both Very Curious and on the hunt for a wild growing Atropa Belladonna plant..I was told not to hold my breath but I SWEAR I’d found one 2yrs ago in the yard of my ex husband in Danbury CT-so, what’re the chances of finding actual Atropa belladonna growing wild in CT?
    Answer
    Dear Fludderkiddie, good morning. Atropa belladonna has never been collected in New England as a naturalized plant. While it can be grown, no botanist has yet to find it in the wild. I don't want to curb your enthusiasm, please, keep looking--but it may be a long search. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this grass was found in a dry rocky understory of a deciduous forest in SE Connecticut. The grass was in a small colony with individuals up to 2 feet in height. The loose inflorescence was approximately 6 in. The widest leaf blade was apprx 1-inch in diameter. Based on the description, the closest I could come was Piptatherum racemosum...unfortunately I didn’t have a ruler to measure the lemma awn or the spikelet. Thanks!
    Answer
    Good morning eehrlich11, you have photographed Patis racemosa (black-seeded-rice grass). This species has been known by the name Piptatherum racemosum in recent literature. The broad leaves that are well developed on the upper part of the stem and long awns on the lemmas are good characteristics to distinguish this from other closely related species.
  • Question
    Hi! Found this plant in SE CT. There was no flower but the leaves were lobed and the stem was heavily pubescent. The plant was in upland forest growing next to a rock. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, good morning. You have photographed, most likely, the basal leaves of Ranunculus recurvatus (hooked crowfoot). This native species has lobed leaves with an outline much like you have captured here in your images. If you examine other pictures online, I think you will note the similarity. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I understand this site is geared towards ID rather than forest pathology but wanted to see if you had any insight: this is a heavily damaged witch hazel. This disease has impacted many naturally occurring H. Virginana in the area and the plants have 60-90% of their leaves affected. The leaves turn brown. It’s unconfirmed but may be a fungus Phyllosticta hamamelidis based research. Is there a possibly fatal disease that heavily impacts this species and is it known to be a bad year?
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, I do wish I could help with your question, but I'm not a plant pathologist. The leaves you have photographed don't seem to be experiencing the exact same symptoms as other images I have viewed of this pathogen. I don't know for certain who it is, but I hope you are able to find out. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, we saw this ground-cover with small waxy leaves at the the Garden in the Woods this weekend and were curious what it was. Would appreciate any help.
    Answer
    Dear Nncinj0Qk7, good morning. I don't know which plant you have photographed. The plantings at Garden in the Woods include some species which are native to other regions of North America. My expertise is wild plants of New England. If you direct this question to someone at Garden in the Woods, they should be able to provide you with an answer. Good luck.
  • Question
    I found this plant last spring growing along a trail
    Answer
    Dear Thehikerrn, good morning. You have photographed Leucojum aestivum (summer snowflake), a member of the Amaryllidaceae. This species is native to Europe and is planted in this part of the world. Very beautiful image.
  • Question
    Hi, I noticed this in bloom next to our compost pile this morning (July 2, Tolland County, CT), growing in semi-shade beneath sumac at the edge of where our sunny back yard meets a wooded area. Is it Circaea canadensis? It would be somewhat atypical of the old-field type vegetation that I usually see in this spot, but I suppose it's plausible that seeds were transported here on the body of an animal that may have come to forage in the compost. Your opinion would be appreciated, thank you!
    Answer
    Dear DavidJ, the plant you have photographed is Circaea canadensis (broad-leaved enchanter's-nightshade), a native member of the evening-primrose family. This species is typically found growing in the shade of deciduous trees. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have this growing as a weed where I spread fresh soil last year. My ID is Solanum dulcamara.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you identification looks correct to me. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Dear Ace Botanist, I have been searching online for what this black seed pod could be. The closest thing I've found is that it could be the seed pod of a large yellow vetch. This site claims that sightings have only been reported in MA. I found this today in Cumberland, RI. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear JuHow, good afternoon. You may have photographed Vicia sativa (common vetch), a species that is naturalized to open, often disturbed, habitats in New England. I can't see all the details that I need to in order to be confident, but this is a good starting point based on what I can see. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Im growing medical cannabis for my niece who is undergoing chemo. My question is about selective defoliation. Does removing leaves to allow light to "budsites" do any good ? Basically I want to know if budsites use light or just leaves ? ty
    Answer
    Dear bobB, I'm sorry I cannot answer your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I'm not super familiar with Cannabis cultivation. I suggest contacting one of the many medicinal marijuana shops and finding someone who can answer your question. Good luck.
  • Question
    My daughter-in-law gave me this transplant last year from her lake cabin in mid Maine. She has a patch in her part shade garden in Newport, ME. We live on the Midcoast in Maine. I needed something for my shade garden beside astilbe and hosta and we put this in. It was planted last August, died back this winter, came up this Spring doubling in size.We have looked at wildflower, weed, and floral ids but can’t seem to ID it. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear MaineMimi, it looks like you have photographed Lysimachia punctata (large yellow-loosestrife), a species that is often cultivated and sometimes escapes. The species is native to Europe, and we find it sometimes around old home sites that are today located deep in the forest.
  • Question
    This was at the edge of a clearing for a housing development in Belchertown MA. I found a larger one about 20 feet into the woods. Using gobotany, the closest match I can find is Fallopica japonica. The abaxial surface of the leaves is very hairy. The leaves on the photographed plant are up to 11cm wide. Even larger on the other one. When I pulled, it snapped off at ground level. Does it look like Japanese knotweed? No flowers yet. If so, what can I do? I only see a few...
    Answer
    Dear Markfanty, good morning. You have photographed a poplar stump sprout (genus Populus). It is difficult to identify the plant without being present. The lobing on the leaves suggests it may be a hybrid with Populus alba (white poplar). Often, the best strategy is to find a mature tree in the vicinity, which will have normal leaves that aren't enlarged to make a good hypothesis from. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I saw these purple flowers along the side of the Winnock Woods Trail in Cape Elizabeth in early June. It was definitely shaded woodland. Do you know what they are? Thanks, Drew.
    Answer
    Dear areddy, good morning. You have photographed Polygaloides paucifolia (fringed false milkwort). This native plant has been known recently as Polygala paucifolia, but it was recently transferred to a new genus due to phylogenetic study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This tree self-seeded along the property line, where there is mulch from my dog's pen. It has been around since the 90's and has dainty white flowers in the spring. It is now about 30 feet tall. The area where it is growing is mostly hemlock trees, white pine, and some maples and beech trees. It is on a shady slope leading to a pond.
    Answer
    Dear CarolBEE, The leaves and bark suggest this tree is Prunus pensylvanica (pin cherry). It would have had small, white flowers in a fascicle earlier in the spring and will produce small, red fruits in a couple of weeks or so. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here is a tree or shrub that showed up along the property line with my neighbor's yard. it is flowering now but has just a few white flowers. It is on a shady slope with hemlocks towering overhead and Rhododendron bushes. The soil is acidic and it is about 30 feet from a pond.
    Answer
    Dear CarolBEE, good morning. There may be more than one species represented in your photographs. The flowering shrub looks like Sambucus nigra (black elderberry), but it also appears that Prunus serotina (black cherry) is also represented in some of the images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm thinking this is a Lobelia species, but can't identify it. It was found in Bangor, ME in a waste area. The flowers cluster comes from the axil. The leaves seem entire about half the length of the leaf, then is toothed. Hairs on stems and leaves. Irregular flower with upper and lower lips. Each flower is about 1/4 inch long and leaves (compound?) are about 1 inches -1 1/4 inches long. Can you help me identify this plant? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear GMartha, good morning. You have photographed Medicago sativa (purple medick, also known as alfalfa). This is a member of the legume family that has been introduced to New England as forage for farm animals. You will find it here and there in the region, especially in areas with a long history of agriculture and animal husbandry. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Dear Ace Botanist, This 25-foot tree volunteered in a shaded, damp area in the North Quabbin region of Massachusetts. Fuzzy stems, leaves. I think it's some sort of sumac but not the kind with tight red flower bundles. Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear tracy, good afternoon. There is no image associated with your question. Without one, I won't be able to answer. If you are having trouble uploading images, please attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    Help! I can't ID this plant! I found it in NH near a wetland (pretty sure it was living on a lawn near by though) it has white flowers. maybe its hard to ID because it's young?
    Answer
    Dear eclair, good afternoon. It looks like you have photographed Cerastium fontanum (mouse-ear chickweed). This is a species in the Caryophyllaceae that is introduced from Europe to lawns and open areas. It is usually not a problematic species that is aggressive with its growth. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Location new England landscape thought it was a boxwood shrub Leaves look smooth but are actually fine sawtooth. Alternate arrangement White milky sap when removed a leaf Shiny leaf about 2 inches long
    Answer
    Dear Ziomekszuszka, good afternoon. It appears this plant is cultivated. If so, I likely will not be able to assist you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. If this has been brought into cultivation from the wild, please send a couple of images when it gets larger and/or flowers. I may be able to assist then. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Long time member of New England Wildflower Society Friend came up with some unusual seeds Can you help identify? Growing some in a controlled environment hoping to be able to add other images May be very old, not sure about viability Seed pod is 4 chambered measuring 12.5 mm Seeds measure 7 by 5 mm
    Answer
    Dear chastmoses, good morning. I'm sorry I cannot assist you. I simply don't have enough information to go on. If you find more of the plant or learn where the plant originated from, feel free to email me directly at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Growing in a field in Belmont, Massachusetts. My ID is Apocynaceae, probably Cynanchum based on where the flowers are (small groups along the stem instead of a large cluster at the top like milkweed).
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. You have photographed Vincetoxicum nigrum (synonym: Cynanchum louisiae). This species is a member of the Apocynaceae, but more closely allied to milkweeds than dogbanes. As the shoot elongates, they will become more vining. This species is, in many instances, highly invasive (though with very interesting flowers).
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr. I found a rush in my backyard that seems to match J dichotomus. The leaves appear curved not terete or flat. There are a few bracts that do not extend beyond the inflorescence. And, the auricles appear curved, not pointed as in J tenuis. Also, the environment is dry acidic soil, not moist or swampy. I would appreciate your assessment please :) Thank you in advance Edward
    Answer
    Dear califyank, yes, from what I can see in your images, this plant does look like Juncus dichotomous. There are a couple of forms we see in New England. One has +/- flat leaves and one has leaves nearly circular in cross-section (though usually with a channel-like grove on the upper surface). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thankyou very much. I found out that my plant name is Solanum xanti hoffmannii or Hoffmann's Nightshade. It thrives in zone 9&10.
    Answer
    Dear Ngaton, good morning. I'm glad you found an answer. I'm familiar (in passing) with Solanum xanti, but the corolla coloration of your plant (and the indument--type and density of hairs) did not seem to match. I'm glad you have a name for your mystery. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, Thankyou for replying. I will post again my thorny purple flowers vine. This was giving to me last year, already in a pot with some flowers on it and the owner did not know the name. I planted this vine in a bigger pot and tyed round a brick colummn in my front yard in Southern California, the climate here is what they call Mediterranean. (Maybe zone 9). I thought the vine is nightshade, bittersweet but unable to find a similar image.
    Answer
    Dear Ngaton, good morning. I'm sorry I can't assist you. You are located a long way from my area of expertise (northeastern North America). I suggest that you contact an organization closer to you that will have a familiarity with the species that grow in your region. I can help you locate one if you need assistance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this catbird grape ( vitis palmata)? I live in Southeast MI
    Answer
    Dear GAM3, good morning. Unfortunately, I can't tell you with certainty from the image supplied. I would need to see the undersurface of the leaf to confirm that it is not supplied with a dense layer of hairs and I need to see the branchlets of the season to observe their color (purple-red in Vitis palmata). Perhaps you will be able to confirm these features for yourself. Good luck.
  • Question
    What is the name of this thorny purple flowers vine ?
    Answer
    Dear Ngaton, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help you as much as I would like. I don't know where this image was taken. Without location information, I'm not able to provide a confident answer. You have, what appears to be, a member of the genus Solanum (nightshade). If you can post additional images (leaves and sepals) and let me know where the plant grows, I may be able to identify the species.
  • Question
    Follow up on my Juniperus. The plant is in Belchertown wetlands, off George Hannum street, right at the edge of a clearing made in 2018 for a housing development. Here is the whole plant, to the extent it can be seen. Thanks for the education. I don't know why I did not consider Juniper - I guess because I thought the needles were too open. They are prickly though, so I should have.
    Answer
    markfanty, yes, Juniperus communis is unusual relative to the other species in New England. While they (J. virginiana and J. horizontilis) have opposite leaves that are imbricate and clothe (i.e., conceal) the branchlets, Juniperus communis (photographed by you) has whorled leaves that do not conceal the branchlets. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is Curly Dock invasive? I inherited a garden and I wonder if the previous owner planted it. I find herbs and plants in the oddest places throughout the yard that have a history of medicinal uses and I suspect she might have intentionally planted this. The house itself is full of Yankee ingenuity that harks back to the 19th century so it would follow that she planted plants from that time period as well.
    Answer
    Dear susanmccaslin, Rumex crispus (curly dock) is typically invasive, though it can form some large clumps at times. It is very capable of showing up in strange situations, and may have not been planted (though, as you noted, it is an important medicinal plant with evidence-based research to support its efficacy). I do not know for certain the plants you have pictured are this species. I would need a closer view of the mature flowers. There are several species that look very similar to this one at distance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Been trying to identify this wildflower. Saw it in a prairie setting in Prairie Wolf Park, Grand Rapids MI. Small flowers, I'm guessing an alfalfa possibly?
    Answer
    Dear Auntiedee, good afternon. From this photograph, the best I can offer is Medicago sativa (purple medick, also called alfalfa). It is one of the few blue/purple-flowered members of this genus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Looking for info on this oak. In Westbrook CT. It sits on my property by the side of the road. I thought this was just a cut-down tree but it seems to have or had multiple trunks. Should I let it grow? Will it become a tree?
    Answer
    Dear susanmccaslin, good morning. Oaks are very difficult to identify without good images of the leaves (top and bottom surfaces). This is because the leaf outline is important, but so is knowledge of the hairs (kind, density, presence/absence). Without this, I won't be able to be confident. All I can say at the moment is that you have a species in the black oak group, almost all of which are trees (but there is a dwarf species--Quercus illicifolia, scrub oak). If you can get more images of the leaves, I may be able to provide a more confident answer.
  • Question
    I saw these last week in Black Pond State Wildlife Area in central CT. The general habitat was woodland. They were growing on a partially lit trail across from a small pond. The soil they were in was somewhat rocky, and muddy, but looked like it would dry up quickly in the heat. It's possible they are wetland plants that seeded there due to the rain and prolonged cool weather. The leaves are opposite and strongly purple-tinged. They had no blooms yet. I was thinking a spp. of beggar's-ticks?
    Answer
    Dear Heartwind, good morning again. I can't be sure from you image, but the larger plant does look like a possible Bidens (beggar-ticks). Given the leaves are simple and with petioles, it is likely Bidens connata (purple-stemmed beggar-ticks) or something close to that. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Years ago, I transplanted a Bloodroot from a woodland edge in wetland. Then, this seeded itself from the rootbound soil.Now, it's been growing in woodland shade with no direct sunlight. I've returned to the original site several times since, but could find no population of this sedge. I followed the dichotomous key rigorously and kept coming up with Carex squarrosa, which is uncommon in CT. It is doing very well, but I hate seeing its seeds go to waste. Would it be of interest to botanists here?
    Answer
    Dear Heartwind, good morning. Beautiful plant you have photographed. It does look like Carex squarrosa to me as well. I will ask the conservation department and identify if the seeds would be of value. If so, I will get back in touch with you. Thank you for your offer--it is appreciated.
  • Question
    Hello. I found these plants along the Taunton River in Bridgewater in mid June. I think they may be False Nettle but, without the flowers, I am not sure. The image of the river is to indicate the height of the plants (in the foreground) at that time. As it was not easy to get to this location, I'd be grateful for your help in identification. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear ruby6_20, good morning. The plants in the image look most like small-spiked false-nettle (Boehmeria cylindrica). They are a frequent member of some riparian communities, such as the one you have photographed. There are micromorphological characters that help distinguish this species from other related genera (e.g., Pilea). They are presented in the identification key on Go Botany.
  • Question
    Moist woods in Pioneer Valley MA. Blooming late June. I used the key and got Pyrola elliptica - curved pistils, leaf shape/size, short wide sepals. I'm not very good at using keys. Correct?
    Answer
    Dear markfanty, Yes, the plant you have photographed does look like Pyrola elliptica (elliptic-leaved shinleaf), a native member of the heath family. The short, triangular sepals are a good flowering characteristic to identify this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    small everygreen about 1ft high, moist woods in Pioneer valley. I was thinking yew, but it has a very distinctive white stripe on the *top* of the needles, which I can't find mentioned.
    Answer
    Dear markfanty, you have photographed a species of Juniperus (juniper). It is likely Juniperus communis (common juniper), which has a obvious stomatal band on the adaxial (upper) surface of the leaves. If I could see the entire plant and know where this photograph was taken I could help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have these plants in my yard and I'm thinking they are all wild lettuce but one is a little different. Can you help me identify. I will upload pictures.
    Answer
    Dear Shooker, good morning. The images do look like a species of lettuce. There is tremendous variation, within the same species at the same location, for leaf lobing. I don't know where these images were taken, but if they were within New England, it is likely you have photographed Lactuca canadensis (tall lettuce). This species usually produces yellow flower heads in the summer.
  • Question
    Do you know what this is? It’s a vegetable but not sure what veg it is.
    Answer
    Dear Marchmellow, good morning. With the information provided I can't assist you. I don't know where this image was taken, and without location information, identifications of plants can be very difficult. Location information is critical as part of the process. Sorry I can't assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A large grass growing beside a private road in the woods in Lincoln, Massachusetts. Possibly an escaped or planted ornamental.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. You have photographed a member of the Triticeae (e.g., wheat, rye, barley). It looks like Triticum aestivum (bread wheat), which occasionally escapes cultivation in New England and ends up on roadsides and field edges. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi again folks! Hope everyone is doing well! I have a question...I've been trying to order a Purples Smoke tree, from Farmer Seed and Nursery. This is the latest one they sent me...and it looks nothing at all like what I ordered. Can you possible identify for me what type of tree it is? I am in Harrison County, WV...but ordered this plant on line. I'd appreciate your assistance...this is the third attempt to get what I paid them for. Respectfully, Mark L. Barnett
    Answer
    Dear tke735, good morning. You appear to have photographed a species of Morus (mulberry). I can't identify which one without more information, but hopefully knowing the genus will allow you to start your study of this plant. It is certainly not Cotinus coggygria (smoke tree). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Last fall I planted a dormant shrub that was sold as a native species of Viburnum. Now it's blooming and I don't know what I have or where it's from.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. It looks like a member of the Celastraceae. Our naturalized species of Euonymus (spindle-tree) have 4-merous flowers (note that yours is five). Based on this, it may be Euonymus obovatus, which is a shrub sold in the nursery trade.
  • Question
    This plant grows in the yard of the house, stem and leaf surface and has trichomes. what is the name of this plant species?
    Answer
    Dear azzikri, good morning. I'm sorry I cannot help you with your question. The plant is not developed enough to allow me to offer a hypothesis on its identification. Also, I don't know where this image comes from. Location information is critical for the identification process. Please be sure to let me know where plant photographs were taken (generally) in the future so I can help you better. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I apologize if I'm on the wrong site. I'm trying to find out what plant this is. I'm in SE Texas so if I need to go elsewhere please let me know. This volunteered as tribute climbing my front porch. I was going to pull it. After my hands rubbed the leaves I noticed a movie theatre buttered popcorn smell. My husband said it smelled like fritos to him. Can you identify this? I've been searching the internet for about 4 days now. Thanks, Pam
    Answer
    Dear mcmom25@1, good afternoon. I can't identify this vine with any confidence without flowers. You are quite some distance from my region of expertise--but sometimes I recognize what I see, even part way across the continent. You may need to find more local expertise to identify this without flowers. If you need help locating local assistance, email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will assist further.
  • Question
    This plant is growing in Essex County, MA in shade next to Solomon's seal. It is about a foot high and has white fleshy roots. I don't have a picture of the flower but the seed pod is three sided.
    Answer
    Dear Lennie, it looks like you have a variegated form of a species of Uvularia (bellwort), members of the Colchicaceae. I can't tell you for certain which species you have, but it appears to be Uvularia sessilifolia (sessile-leaved bellwort). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant growing in yard . thorny leaves and stems , white star shaped flowers , usually 5-10 in bundle at end of stem . Flower width 30 mm . Simple lobed leaves , alternate . Plant grows at least 2ft long . I think it is of the knotweed family , but not sure . these plants commonly seen throughout east coast . June . Clay or sandy soil , medium drainage .
    Answer
    Dear Srchr2, good afternoon. There is no image associated with your question. Without one, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, please attach them to an email and send them directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    This bright orange flower is growing in a roadside meadow in Harrisville, NH. It looks like Erysimum capitatum - but that is not supposed to occur here. Erysimum asperum can have "orangish" flowers, according to Marilyn Dwelley, but she says the plant is "ash-colored" and this is definitely not ash-colored.
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, good morning. The species in your photograph does look like Erysimum capitatum (sand-dune wallflower). But, to confirm this, we need a measurement of the petal length (including the narrow basal portion where it attaches to the receptable) and sepal length. Could you acquire these for me? If so, please email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so we can discuss further. This may be a new state record!
  • Question
    I live in Prince Edward Island, Canada (zone 5B) My vegetable garden got flooded just after planting seed and now I have no idea what this plant is.
    Answer
    Dear kjoneil, good morning. You have photographed a species of Persicaria (smartweed). It looks like P. coccinea (scarlet smartweed), a native wetland and amphibious plant that can grow in terrestrial habitats. This species is often included in a broadly defined P. amphibia (water smartweed), and referred to as the terrestrial variant--but these are two different species. Be well.
  • Question
    Hello, we are trying to identify this plant we are finding in our Portland, Maine neighborhood. No flowers at this point. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear readingjag, good morning. The plant you have photographed is likely Solidago rugosa (wrinkle-leaved goldenrod), a native member of the composite family that is common in fields and wetlands. This species, like others of its genus, will produce an abundance of yellow flower heads in the later summer that are utilized by many pollinators, including native bees.
  • Question
    Hi again Arthur. First of all, thank you (and NPT) so much for your excellent ID. Most of us should be able to do most of the ID with the help of our books and GO Botany, but sometimes I get totally stumped - and so I really appreciate your help! Ok so I'm working in a ag field Damariscotta Lake, and I'm concerned that some extremely aggressive grasses arrived in some fill when a farm road was rebuilt. Here are 3 of them. I think one is Reed Canary Grass, but the others... still working on.THX!
    Answer
    Dear limnjucy, good morning. As best I can, from left to right, your grasses are Bromus inermus (smooth brome), Elymus repens (creeping wild-rye), and Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass). To be certain, if we are to identify any grasses in the future, I need an image of the inflorescence (which you have captured well here), one that is close-up of the spikelets, and one of the junction of the leaf sheath and blade (so I can see ligules and auricles, if present). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in Southern California. I bought these plants at a nursery in Lakewood, california. When I bought them it didn’t have a name for them. I kept on searching for them on the internet and i could never find them. Seems like they could be a native plant.If you could help me identify them that would be great. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear jaclyn01, good morning. I'm sorry that I cannot be of more assistance. You have a legume (Fabaceae), but I do not know who. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Sometimes I can help beyond that range and sometimes I can't. You need to get in touch with folks who study the flora of California. I can help you connect with them if you would like. Email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org if you want more assistance and I'll show you how to find the expertise you need to solve your mystery. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in Eastern Ma. These garden plants were here when I bought the house. I'd just like to know the name of them. Come late summer a small yellow flower will appear. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear tvfreelancer, good morning. Unfortunately, I can't assist you with your question yet, not with confidence. I will need to see flowers. If you can post an image with the yellow flowers later in the season, I should be able to assist you better. It looks like it could be a species of Ligularia (also called ligularia as a common name), which are composites with yellow ray flowers related to our native species of Packer (groundsel). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am hoping for help in identifying 2 goldenrod plants. The seed I obtained from a seed collector was supposed to be solely Solidago speciosa, but it has become apparent that there are 2 different plants growing and I am not sure that either of them is speciosa. Any help in IDing these would be most appreciated. We are developing Founder Plots of native plants and it is imperative that we have a row of just one plant variety and that it is correctly identified. Thank you for your time!
    Answer
    Dear jean, good morning. I can't identify the plants from the images, especially without the flower heads. However, I can get you started in the right direction. The first two images are a species in the section Triplenervae (e.g., Solidago canadensis, S. gigantea, S. altissima). The second one I can't identify, but it is not Solidago speciosa, the leaves are far too prominently toothed for that species. While both are likely native species, neither are the target one. I hope this is helpful. If you get me photos of the leaves and flowers later in the summer, I can help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this liana at the woods edge in Freeport Maine. I thought maybe wild yam, or chinese yam, but.... I'm not sure. Could you help me out? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear limnjucy, good morning. You have photographed Smilax herbacea (carrion-flower) a native vine related to other species of greenbriar. This is the only species that is herbaceous and unarmed in the genus here (all the others in the northeast are woody and have prickles).
  • Question
    is it poisonous? looks like mariquana, its just a wild plant here in the Philippines
    Answer
    Dear34trollwar, good morning. I'm sorry I can't assist you. My expertise does not extend to the Philippines. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. You will want to find a plant museum that is dedicated to the flora of your area to ask questions. If you need help locating one, I can assist you.
  • Question
    Grass growing near forest edge, Lincoln, Massachusetts, with aphids and a predator of aphids among the flowers.
    Answer
    jfc, good morning. I think you have photographed a species of Poa (blue grass). You could confirm this by taking a spikelet apart and looking for cobwebby hairs at the base of the floral scales. There are several species it could be, but I would need a specimen to identify it for you with any confidence. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A sedge growing between unpaved road and strip of woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, the plant in the photograph looks like Carex scoparia (broom sedge). This is a common member of the section Cyperoideae (including section Ovales), as marked by the conspicuously flattened and wing-margined perigynia. This species will have acuminate to shortly awn-tipped carpellate scales that do not extend to the apex of the perigynia they subtend.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr! I encountered this pink/lavender flower growing in a sidewalk. A quick check in Wildflowers of New England did not reveal it possible identify. I am hoping that you recognize this flower. Thank you in advance. The siting was June 15, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good morning. You have photographed Spiraea japonica (Japanese meadowsweet). This, as you would surmise from its name, is native to Asia and has been introduced to New England through the horticulture trade. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is the name of this plant and it's used?
    Answer
    Dear Calvin, you've photographed a species of Persicaria (smartweed) in the knotweed family. I can't tell you for certain which species it is without flowers and without knowing where this photograph was taken. If we are able to narrow it down to the species, then I can share historical uses of the plant. Be well.
  • Question
    Was told this could be Rock Elm?!
    Answer
    Dear fallenfromview, good morning. I can't tell you which species of Ulmus (elm) this is with any confidence. I would need additional images showing the diagnostic characters of this species complex (such as flowers, branchlets, etc.). I would also need to know where this elm was growing (generally, such as which state if was found in). Location information is really important as part of the identification process. If you can acquire more images, I may be able to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am looking to obtain some rhizomes of Stachys palustris. I live in Western NC in zone 6b. Do you or do you know of someone from whom I could purchase some Stachys palustris to plant on my herb farm? I have tried starting it from seed with no luck. We have Stachys sylvatica here in abundance in the wild but I would love some palustris. Thank you kindly, Meredith
    Answer
    Dear mamabearmer, good morning. Stachys palustris is a non-native species (originating in Europe). You may be interested in Stachys pilosa, our native element of this complex. That written, I do not know where you can obtain rhizomes. It is a beautiful species and I wish you success in locating them. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you possibly tell me the name of this wild flower plant found in Georgia's General Coffee State Park, in a dried up creek bed. The patch was almost a full acre in size. The sweet smell this flower put out very strong and very sweet. I would post a close up but we can only post one photo, sorry.
    Answer
    Dear ETLOVE, good morning. You have photographed Saururus cernuus (Lizard's-tail), a native wetland plant in the Saururaceae. This species is characterized by the slender array of white flowers that drupe over at the apex. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant came from Florida, is ages old and has had the leaves burnt by the sun in Ohio. Now all I have is the stem which is succulent type on the inside and rough on the outside. I have one tiny leaf left. Can you help id so I can try to propagate it. Thank You, Kim
    Answer
    Dear ohiofreedove, good morning. I do wish I could assist you, but Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Some cultivated species and their care is not known to me. I do hope you succeed in learning about your plant and how to rescue it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this arrow wood? Saw in Leominster state forest.
    Answer
    Dear marno, good morning. Yes, your plant looks like Viburnum dentatum (smooth arrowood). The leaf blades have a distinctive toothing and venation that help to identify this shrub. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Lincoln, Massachusetts. Growing in the middle of a shallow pond with Nuphar and Nymphaea. There is a lot of Scirpus cyperinus at one edge. This pond is connected to another pond where cattails grow. I might be able to get a closer picture but the plant itself is inaccessible to me.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you've photographed a species in the Poaceae (grass family), but I can't yet tell you who the plant is. It will require flowers/fruits to identify this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Is this a wild rose bush? It has thorns and white flowers, found near stonewall in Mass.
    Answer
    Dear Howard, you appear to have photographed Rosa multiflora (rambler rose). This is a non-native rose that originated in Asia. It generally produces a multi-flowered array of flowers with white petals. It can be very aggressive with its growth, but it is certainly a beautiful plant.
  • Question
    Hi, Found in Mass. near stonewall. Is this autumn olive? Srub/small tree.
    Answer
    Dear Howard, good morning. There is no image associated with your question. If you are having difficulty uploading images, please feel free to email the pictures to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello from Atco, NJ. I have this ground cover coming up in my flower bed around my succulents. Not sure if it came with them or if it’s from the many birds we have in our area. However I’m growing quite fond of it would like to know what it is? TIA!!!
    Answer
    Dear Cole214, good morning. You have photographed a species of Euphorbia (spurges), specifically, a species of sandmat (a group that has been placed in its own genus as Chamnaesyce). I can't tell you exactly which species you have photographed without images of the ovary or fruit. However, it is likely Euphorbia maculata (spotted sandmat), a common species within the genus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    These small yellow flowers appeared on my driveway mostly under an oak tree after rain the night of June 4-5. I included a picture of the lower leaves of the tree, apparently a red oak or near. (Red, white, and scarlet all grow in the area.) Are these oak flowers? Do oaks only produce flowers in the upper part of the tree?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. The flowers do not belong to the oak. They look like the flowers of Celastrus orbiculatus (Oriental bittersweet). Does this liana grow in the area? Best wishes.
  • Question
    A lot of these fell at the beginning of June in Lincoln, Massachusetts, apparently from high up in trees. What did they come from?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed the staminate ament (pollen-bearing catkin) of a species of Quercus. I can't tell you which species based on the image alone, but hopefully knowing the genus will be of use to you.
  • Question
    Is this bittersweet growing all over the trees at the wood's edge? I don't recall any orange fruit last fall.
    Answer
    Dear markfranty, yes, it looks like you have photographed Celastrus orbiculatus (Oriental bittersweet). The plants may not have been mature enough to produce an abundance of flowers/fruits. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this iris growing in a low spot at the edge of a field near a pond in Lincoln, Massachusetts. It is much smaller than my cultivated Iris versicolor, only 20 cm tall. The size is consistent with the alternative in the sibirica-veriscolor couplet of the key: flower 7 cm wide overall, broadest petals about 2 cm wide, leaves about 6 mm wide.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, it is much more likely you have photographed a stunted Limniris versicolor (blue beardless-iris). The petals are too narrow to be Limniris sibirica (the petals are not the large, outer segments of the perianth, those are the sepals, which are much larger than the petals in this genus). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Google image search calls this an Evergreen Rose (Rosa Sempervirens). It is a very prickly plant, and has begun blooming about a week ago. I was told by a gardener that it is a spirea, but I can't find any mention of thorns in the descriptions of spirea I have found. I didn't find any reports of Rosa Sempervirens in CT and it seems to be rather rare-- do you think that is what this is?
    Answer
    Dear yglotzer, good morning. The plant you have photographed may be Rosa sempervirens (evergreen rose), but I would need additional images to be certain. In particular, I need a close-up image of the flower and an image of the leaves that includes the paired appendages at the base of the leaf stalk (the stipules). If you want to upload more images or send them directly to me (ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org), I would be happy to try to help further. It is not a species of Spiraea (as you surmised).
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr! Last year I asked for help with a sedge and your response was C. vulpinoidea. Last night as I was examining some perigynia I remove the ovary/achene from a perigynium. The ovary/achene seems to resemble the image posted for Carex annectens. This sedge is growing in my yard and the nutrients may be lacking to allow the plant to develop to its full potential. The inflorescence was about 2 cm long. I would appreciate your input. Thank you for you response :)
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good morning. The best way to identify between Carex annectens and Carex vulpinoidea is the leaf length relative to the flowering/fruiting stems. Carex annectens has stems that conspicuously surpass the height of the leaves, C. vulpiniodea has stems that are about the same height as the leaves. The other characteristics are far more subtle and require knowledge of both species. The perigynia you photographed (very nicely, by the way) are not mature so the colors are not yet diagnostic. The beak length does seem to fit better for C. vulpinoidea. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This small tree is growing at the edge of woods next to my house in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Using the interactive key Fraxinus pennsylvanica seems the best match: opposite compound leaves with asymmetric bases and teeth on the edges.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. You certainly have a species of Fraxinus, and it is either F. americana or F. pennsylvanica. But, I would need to see leaf scars and branchlets to be able to tell you which species you have. Sorry I can't be of more help.
  • Question
    I have what google reverse image is calling Rosa sempervirens (Evergreen Rose). I'm in Ohio. The description fits this plant though this is the first year I have any flowers. Can you confirm this? I would like to relocate it on my property though because it's in a bad spot. The growth just exploded this year over the last month. It's very prickly along the stems, just like roses.
    Answer
    Dear New2greenery, good morning. The rose you have photographed may or may not be Rosa sempervirens. In order to confirm the identification, I would need to see some of details that are not present in your images. For example, I need a closer image of the flower to assess style exsertion, and a nice image of the leaves (including the stipules at the base). If you can provide a few more close up images, I will be happy to help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr! I would appreciate you assessment of the image provided. My guides have used relatively few characteristics and have suggest Carex swanii. There appears to be three stigma and the carpellate scale seems to be equal to the perigynium. And, there is substantial pubescence on the perigynium. Thank you in advance for your in for you response. Ed
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good evening. Yes, you do appear to have photographed Carex swanii (Swan's sedge). It is a common member of the section Porocystis. The densely pubescent perigynia, short spikes, and gynecandrous terminal spike are all good characters. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I sent an inquiry Saturday, and I also saw a question about a plant identified as silene. It was not the same as my plant, but very similar. I looked it up and I think the plant I photographed is Silene flos-cuculi or ragged robin, a native of Europe. Not a native NE plant.
    Answer
    CarolBEE, good evening. I've responded to your question, the plant is Lychnis flos-cuculi (ragged robin lychnis). If you have any other questions, you are welcome to email me directly at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org.
  • Question
    I think this came from a garden sale, but I do not recall the name. I have not seen one ever again. The first time it flowered, it was far from showy, but the bees loved it. I thought it must be a native plant. This year it suddenly spread out and there is a lot more to it. I thought it was foxglove until it started growing upwards. The flower is pink and small. It grows well in partial shade, and likes compost!
    Answer
    Dear CarolBEE, you have photographed Lychnis flos-cuculi (ragged robin lychnis). This is a spring-flowering plant that is native to Europe, but quite common in moist to wet fields and ditches. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have a 16yr old 7 foot tall saguaro cactus we purchased from a private owner. He said 10 years ago he sprayed miracle grow on it and it created a dry brown flaky spot. We repotted in a mix of potting soil, perlite, gravel, sand, and charcoal. Should I be concerned about the flaky spot? I know they are hardy, but we want RosaBella (the name we gave her) to be healthy. The brown spot starts just below the arms on the one side and finishes just above the smallest arm.
    Answer
    Dear chendrix737@gmail.com, good afternoon. I'm sorry I can't help you with your question. This needs to be directed to someone with expertise in the cultivation of cacti of the southwestern United States. I have seen Carnegiea gigantea often when I visit AZ, and most specimens did not have the flaky area you note. I encourage you to seek out a cactus growing group to help find answers to your question. Good luck.
  • Question
    Do not know how to classify. Short, always in shaded debris, generally moist ground cover, found on mountain trails in N.H. Seems reasonably common. Don't know how to narrow down characteristics to lookup it's name. No particular leaves or flowers. Pics taken early June. Cheers!
    Answer
    Dear tsobell, good afternoon. You have photographed a fern, likely a member of the genus Dryopteris (wood fern). This genus typically has conspicuous scales on the petiole (as shown in your images). While I could guess at the species, it would be better to see images when the leaves expand to help you further.
  • Question
    Found at the edge of a field near a river in Kennebunk Maine. I think it is Orobanche species.
    Answer
    Dear docj77, you have photographed Aphyllon uniflorum (one-flowered cancer-root). This is a native, parasitic plant in the Orobanchaceae. It has been referred to as Orobanche uniflora in past literature, but recent studies demonstrate it belongs to a different genus. Great image. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello sir,sapindales and Rutaceae,are they from the similar family group? I mean same jenus family?If so, as far as I understand;Maple tree belongs to sapindales family and curry leaves tree belongs to Rutaceae family.Therefore,can we budd/graft curry leaves tree in Maple tree?The reason why my queries is curry leaves tree can't grow in UK weather but Maple tree may suffer in uk weather.So just wondering,whethe if I graft/budd curry leaves tree into Maple tree will it be worth doing it?Thanks
    Answer
    Dear sajumwk, the Sapindaceae (soapberry family) and the Rutaceae (rue family) are different families of plants. Both of these families belong to the order Sapindales--which is a rank above family. I do not know if you can graft woody plants of one family to the other one. That is a question for someone with expertise in horticulture and grafting. I'm sorry I can't assist you with your question.
  • Question
    I found something that may be sweetfern on the dry sandy bank of our septic field in north central Mass. The field was planted with a native mix of plant seed 3 years ago but also has plenty of plants that were not in the seed mix. Can you tell from these photos whether the plant is sweetfern? It is a woody shrub about 2-3 feet tall. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear MA_Hiker, you have indeed photographed Comptonia peregrina (sweetfern). This is a native shrub that is often found in dry, sterile soils (though it is not limited to those locations). The bruised leaves will smell strongly of resin, similar to Morella (bayberry), a member of the same plant family.
  • Question
    The abundant red seeds of this maple caught my eye. Growing in the flood plain of the Concord River, Concord, Massachusetts May 13, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, there are two native maples that frequently grow in wetlands that flower long before the leaves emerge and fruit early in the season: Acer rubrum and Acer saccharinum. You appear to have the latter based on what I can see from the expanding leaves and branchlet orientation (those of A. saccharinum tend to have obvious upward curves to them).
  • Question
    Here's a mystery plant growing alongside a garden plot in Long Island NY. Soils are sandy and well drained. Any ideas on what it might be?
    Answer
    Dear awaring, good afternoon. I can't identify your plant with confidence without flowers or fruits. It could be a very robust Epilobium (willow-herb, a member of the evening-primrose family). If it flowers, please upload an image so I can help you further.
  • Question
    This plant, which I assume is a fern, grows in a shaded wetland on my property in Granville, MA. It has a vertical, vase-shaped habit. The clumps grow in rings several feet in diameter. In the spring, the crosiers and stalks are chocolate brown, changing to green as they unfurl and grow. Some of the stalks appear to be fruiting on top (see second photo). It is not evergreen. The only fern pictured in Go Botany that resembles it is the glade fern. Perhaps you could help identify it?
    Answer
    Dear Introvertigo, good afternoon. The plant you have photographed is Osmunda spectabilis (American royal fern). It is a common, native inhabitant of wetlands in New England. Most references will have it listed as Osmunda regalis, but that is a fern species of a different continent (which we know now due to recent study). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Sedge growing in wetlands, Lincoln, Massachusetts. Companions include skunk cabbage and Cinna arundinacea. It resembles a member of Carex section Phacocystis I saw about a half mile away on drier ground.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, I can't see enough of the necessary details to help you get to a more definitive identification than what you have already provided. It is likely Carex stricta (tussock sedge), but I would need to see details of the leaf sheaths, involucral bracts, and perigynia to be certain. Sorry I can't help further.
  • Question
    Sedge growing in open woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts. Flowers are drooping when not supported for the closeup. Sharing habitat with a member of Carex section Phaestoglochin, to its left in the wide shot.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed a member of Carex section Hymenochlaenae. These are sometimes colloquially referred to as the "green danglers". It looks like Carex gracillima, a common species throughout much of New England. The perigynia morphology and gynecandrous terminal spike point to this species.
  • Question
    Checking the i.d. with you. I've scrutinized this against Veronica officianalis and ground-ivy. Definitely not the latter. **The blue of the flowers, a few days ago, was MUCH DEEPER/purple-blue.** (I think this is the end of first flush). Leaves are opposite, almost clasping. Flowers are only 3/8" in diameter. Two stamens each--very noticeable-- and one pistal. Leaves lobe/toothed and don't look like photos of V. officianlis at ALL. Stems have hairs on only two sides. Ht 6-8". In Grass.
    Answer
    Dear hkwaterman, there is no image associated with your question. Without one, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    Did I say that I am quite sure this is Veronica chamaedrys? Wanted to dbl check with you before I post a sighting. Think it is "escapee"... "exotic weed"? beautiful.
    Answer
    Dear hkwaterman, there is no image associated with your question. Without one, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    Sedge growing in shallow water, Lincoln, Massachusetts. It reminds me of Carex crinita, but that species is not aquatic according to the species page (only terrestrial or wetlands).
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed a member of Carex section Vesicariae. There are two species that look like this: Carex comosa and C. pseudocyperus. It looks like you have photographed the former, but I can't see the stiff teeth at the apex of the perigynium well enough to be 100% confident. Perhaps you can examine the population to be confirm the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Asking around what this plant is. No one knows so far. Has red stems. Leaf stem bleeds white when picked. New leaves from center look shiny. About 1-2 ft high. Edge of yard in woods
    Answer
    Dear anbourque, good morning. You've photographed a species of Nabalus (rattlesnake-root). These species are native members of the composite family. We can't tell for certain which one you've pictured, but it may be Nabalus trifoliolatus (three-leaved rattlesnake-root; synonym: Prenanthes trifoliolata). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Dear Ace Botanist, This vigorous looking plant, about 9 inches high and growing, is in a shaded area with moss and ferns in my yard facing northeast in North Quabbin woodlands. I haven't seen it around here before. It doesn't have spines, but the leaf underside is rough. Thanks in advance for what you can tell me!
    Answer
    Dear Tracy, good morning. You have photographed a species of Nabalus (rattlesnake-root), native members of the composite family. We can't tell which species this is without flowers. If you were to look up these plants in a field guide, most will place it with the genus Prenanthes. Best wishes.
  • Question
    We found this in the forest woodlands in the Hudson Valley of New York and can't identify it! The center leaf was a few inches tall (boots for scale!). I'm also curious how to describe this type of leaf?
    Answer
    Dear Thisismebethp, good morning. You've photographed a species of Nabalus (rattlesnake-root), native members of the composite family. The leaf is pinnately compound, with lobed leaflets. If you want to study more about this plant, most references place it with the genus Prenanthes, but phylogenetic study shows these two genera to be distinct lineages.
  • Question
    Forest edge, Lincoln, Massachusetts. Are these shrubs Frangula alnus? Are there any native plants with similar flowers coming out of the base of the leaf stem?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. You have indeed photographed Frangula alnus (glossy-buckthorn). They are pretty distinctive, especially when flowering, and don't have any close look-alikes (in my opinion). While their leaves are sometimes confused with Swida (dogwood), the flowers have five petals and the leaves are alternate (vs. four petals and opposite leaves).
  • Question
    I found this small woodland flowering plant while walking along our village hiking trail, May 25th, in southern Vermont. At first I thought it was a violet, but clearly not. Is it something related to an orchid?
    Answer
    Dear janabryan, good morning. You have photographed Polygaloides paucifolia (fringed false milkwort), a native member of the milkwort family. If you look this species up in many references, it will be listed under the genus Polygala, but recent phylogenetic work shows it to be a separate lineage. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you identify this plant, which I found in my yard in West Newbury, MA? It was mixed in with poison ivy, but is taller than the ivy. Thanks in advance for any info that you can provide.
    Answer
    Dear Junebug49, the plant you photographed is Aralia racemosa (wild sarsaparilla), a native shrub in the celery family. It produces a single compound leaf and flowers on a separate, leafless stalk. A very common understory species in the forests of New England.
  • Question
    Do you know what plant this is? This photo was taken on the Libby River Farm Trail in Scarborough, ME. It was woodland, but it was boggy and near marshlands. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear areddy, these are the leaves of Symplocarpus foetidus (skunk-cabbage), a native wetland plant that flowers very early in the season. If you bruise a leaf, you will detect a fetid odor. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I saw these this morning at Garden In the Woods. Can you tell me what they are and if they are native to New England?
    Answer
    Dear dfish60, good morning. You have photographed a species of Packera (groundsel), a member of the composite family. There are several species native to New England. Unfortunately, there aren't any close images that allow me to examine the leaves; therefore, I can't identify this plant to the species for you. If you get additional closer images, I should be able to help you further.
  • Question
    I have a Pagoda dogwood tree in my backyard. My question is about the scientific name; is it Swida alternifolia or Cornus alternifolia? I keep hearing that the DNA studies do not hold up for Swida. Please enlighten me.
    Answer
    Dear Plantperson, DNA studies contribute to our understanding that Swida is a distinct lineage from the other dogwoods. You are hearing they do not uphold because many botanists (amateur and professional) consider the recognition of four genera of dogwoods unpopular. However, Swida is distinctive in its morphology, phylogeny, geography, patterns of hybridization, and physiology (freeze tolerance is correlated with the four genera). There is ample evidence to recognize the four genera (including Swida). DNA sequence studies using phylogenetic methods demonstrate four distinctive lineages--but those data alone do not necessitate changes, they only support change from our typical way of treating this genus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found May 20, Ossipee NH. Lots of it. In very gravely, sandy soil, though on a slope and written description of area said it could get wet here. Is this Canadian wild ginger? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear ksolstad, you have photographed Epigaea repens (trailing arbutus). This native evergreen plant belongs to the heath family. It has early appearing, very fragrant flowers. The brown remnants of the flowers are visible in the images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this a Rubus? Mixed woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts. Other leaves are probably Maianthemum canadense, which is common.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, it looks like you may have photographed Rubus enslenii (Enslen's blackberry). This is a slender, trailing species with moderate-sized prickles and often a solitary flower on the flowering canes. It is a forest species, often associated with oak and/or hickory.
  • Question
    Wakefield NH. May 20. At a camp- glacial till soil, though in small semi garden area with wild columbine and low bush wild blueberry. The “flower” was hidden deep in the hanging leaves until it opened. This is at a very old family camp- no one has “gardened” to any degree in 50 years, though builder in 1930s did plant some nice flowering bushes .
    Answer
    Dear ksolstad, good morning. You have photographed Maianthemum racemosum (feathery false Solomon's-seal). This is a native species that belongs to the Ruscaceae (butcher's-broom family). It will have red berries later in the season.
  • Question
    Hi again, Regarding Ranunculus carecitorum: Is this native? Invasive? I could only find this reference online: https://books.google.com/books?id=xDsXAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA56&lpg=PA56&dq=ranunculus+carecitorum&source=bl&ots=McihyzUNcW&sig=ACfU3U3t0Xcr88xU4rlGDsYhrrt-vOMl_Q&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjCqNHhztbpAhXSknIEHTmwA80Q6AEwAHoECAEQAQ#v=onepage&q=ranunculus%20carecitorum&f=false Thanks
    Answer
    Ranunculus carecitorum is a native North American crowfoot that occurs in wetlands and along shorelines. It has been called Ranunculus hispidus var. caricetorum in some literature. You can learn more about this species on Go Botany by visiting the taxon page for Ranunculus caricetorum. Best wishes.
  • Question
    For literally 17 years, I've been trying to figure out what kind of flower this is. I've seen/smelled them in Vermont, NYC, and now in Washington DC. Was thinking it was either a geranium or petunia. They smell incredibly nice and sweet. Any idea what it is?
    Answer
    Dear cutmoney, you have photographed a member of the genus Geranium (crane's-bill, also sometimes called geranium for a common name). I could not tell you which species this is as cultivated species are outside of my realm of expertise. I hope knowing the genus will be useful to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This came as a weed with some loam I had delivered last year. The loam was loaded on the truck in Lexington, Massachusetts but the ingredients may be from elsewhere. I thought the plant might be Potentilla but I got stuck in the key. Tape measure divisions are millimeters.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good afternoon. It looks like you have photographed Ranunculus repens (spot-leaved crowfoot), a species native to Europe. It is often weedy, and will occupy lawns, ditches, and low areas in clearings. Best wishes.
  • Question
    In open woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts May 22, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you may have photographed Carex digitalis (slender woodland sedge). This member of section Careyanae is relatively common. The prominent angles, flat faces, and many closely spaced nerves help to determine this section of sedges. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi Ace Botanist, here's some kind of buttercup, I think, growing in very wet conditions in Dutchess County, NY, and in Sharon, CT. The foliage has red marks in the clefts and the stem is very hairy. 6"- 12" tall. It's forming dense colonies. What do you think it is? Thanks, Julia
    Answer
    Dear JuliaB, good morning. You likely have photographed Ranunculus carecitorum (swamp crowfoot). This species is common in swamps and will often have spreading to trailing stems later in the season (a trait that will allow you to confirm it is this species). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this fern in an old flower garden. It grows to about 10-in. tall, shaded location, ordinary soil. Thank You for your time. Dolly
    Answer
    alwayslooking, good morning. I don't know for certain who you have photographed, but the tuft of leaves look more like a composite of some kind (i.e., not a fern). It may be something in the genus Achillea (yarrow), but I'm not confident without flowers. Sorry I can't be of more help.
  • Question
    Plant silhouette and grouping very similar to Indian pipe - One group Of 8 or so along bike path between High ahead and Head of the Meadow Beach N. Truro - no visible leaves, one Horizontal flower per stem, white blossom, 5 equal petals, each petal a fine blue (Very possibly pink but I think blue) line down middle, Plant 4” tall. Other plants - shad, arrowwood viburnum, blueberry.
    Answer
    Dear Charlotte, You have drawn a plant that looks much like Aphyllon uniflorum (one-flowered cancer-root). This plant has gone by the name Orobanche uniflora, so you may want to search online using the older name to find more images to confirm the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here in southwest Connecticut, I have two of the same small multi trunk trees that I stare at frequently from my patio. Self seeded, they would be large shrubs if I hadn't trimmed all the lower branches off. After 15 years they are about 20 feet tall. The leaves are clustered and small. One produces a 3 inch cone shaped silky seed pod, like cotton on a cayenne pepper. I'd like to give these trees a name.
    Answer
    Dear rossvass, good morning. You have photographed a member of the genus Salix (willow). The structure in the photograph is the array of fruits (small, two-valved capsules that open to release seeds with a tuft of hairs to disperse by wind). It may be Salix bebbiana (Bebb's willow), a common, native species. However, I would need additional images to determine who this is with confidence. If you are interested, feel free to email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and we can continue the conversation.
  • Question
    This is growing on a rock at the edge of a brook in Massachusetts in May. Blooming at the same time as wild Viburnam.
    Answer
    Dear bellycat209, good morning. You have photographed Anemone quinquefolia (wood windflower), a native member of the crowfoot family. It is an early, spring-flowering perennial that is often found with other early-flowering species like trout-lily, bloodroot, and Dutchman's-breeches. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Curious what this "weed" is? Growing in sandy, disturbed soil 120 ft from a riverbed, central Maine, late May. Was surprised to see the tuberose roots when I pulled them. Is it edible?
    Answer
    Dear ZealouslyB, you have photographed a species of Oenothera (evening-primrose). It is Oenothera biennis or a closely related species. The taproots are edible, they taste kind of like a parsnip with a mild peppery finish. If they are gathered from plants that are producing an aerial stem, the taproots will become leathery with a woody core. Therefore, foragers are best to direct their efforts toward vegetative (first-year) plants. Be sure to the confirm the identification, and I would encourage a small, well-cooked serving your first meal to identify if you have sensitivities to this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Just wondering what this tree is. Thousands have sprouted this spring. I haven't seen any identification photos with the kind of separate-stem flowers some of these have. Thinking white ash...but can't find any with similar flowers.
    Answer
    Dear jahfre, good afternoon. The species you have photographed is Aralia nudicaulis (wild sarsaparilla). It is a native member of the celery family and is a common forest understory species in New England. You have photographed mature plants--they have a single leaf (which is compound) and a flowering stalk. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, This plant was growing in a rocky portion of a deciduous forest in Connecticut in late May. There were no flowers. The leaves and stem had a dense pubescence. The leaves were heart shaped and had a citrus-like scent. Based on it location, its colonial nature and leaf shape, my assumption would be Asarum canadense. However, these individuals exhibited dentation. The literature indicates leaves of A. canadense being entire.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, good morning. The plants that you have photographed may be Eurybia macrophylla (large-leaved wood-aster) or a related species. These have all the features you've described, including the pubescence you've noted. This group of plants are often colonial and form stands of vegetative plants.
  • Question
    Three dense clumps of this grass with narrow, stiff leaves are growing together in the woods in Lincoln, Massachusetts. The flowers remind me of another grass that was identified as Avenella flexuosa.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. This grass needs to expand just a little more so I can see the spikelets. Currently, they aren't fully open so I can't make out the details I need. It could be Avenella, but there are other species that have some of this morphology as well. Avenella flexuosa will have two awns (bristles) that extend from each spikelet (at maturity). Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is this plant please? They're all over my flower beds and lawn. Those 2 green balls (left in pic) one has a stem still attached, are full of seeds. What is it, how do I get rid of them?
    Answer
    Dear CentralMass, good morning. I'm sorry, I can't help you with your question. This appears to be a cultivated species, something outside of my realm of expertise. I hope you are able to find an answer to your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Open woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts. I see superficially similar flowering stems on cultivated sedges in Carex section Phaestoglochin.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. I can't identify the species with confidence from the images (despite the fact you have taken very nice images). The species is still a bit immature for certain ID. However, it does look like a member of section Phaestoglochin and may be Carex radiata, a common species in New England. I would start there with my search. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What kind of plant is this I found taking over my backyard garden. Seems invasive and chokes off plants around it. How do I get rid of it?
    Answer
    Dear Knighteck, good morning. I'm sorry, I don't know the name of this plant. It is a cultivated species (one I have seen in the garden setting), but I can't provide you with a name. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Some cultivated species will not be known to me. I'm sorry I can't assist you.
  • Question
    Edge of woods, Newton, Massachusetts, May 18, 2020. The simple key suggests Amelanchier (shrub, alternate deciduous leaves with small teeth, flowers in raceme, and it doesn't look like cherry or blueberry).
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good afternoon. You've photographed Prunus virginiana (choke cherry). The obovate leaf blades are a good morphological marker of this species. If you scrape the bark, you'll also notice the characteristic "bitter almond" odor that helps with vegetative specimens. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I've encountered a strange plant on my property that seems to grow near the poison ivy I discovered two weeks ago... That was another surprise discovery to say the least... I can't figure out what it is and if it is a version of poison ivy or something else entirely. I am uploading pictures of it in various stages of growth, please help me figure out what this is. Thank you so much!
    Answer
    Dear Elize33, there are no images associated with your question. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having difficulty uploading images, feel free to email them to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Sedge growing at the edge of a clearing, Lincoln, Massachusetts. Flowers starting mid-April. Tallest stem 45-50 cm. All flowering stems apparently identical, about as tall as leaves with at least two mostly or entirely carpellate spikes below staminate. Although near water (beyond the stone wall) this elevated area is not wet.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you've photographed a member of section Phacocystis, which includes +/- two groups of species in New England, one of which has sessile, upright spikes, such as you've photographed here. I can't answer who this is without a lot more information. Common species in this group of species include Carex stricta and Carex nigra. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Hi, I’ve discovered this plant growing next to poison ivy in the back of my yard, and it seems to be sprouting everywhere. Can you help me identify it? I would much appreciate it!
    Answer
    Dear Elise33, you have photographed the early season shoots of a species of Vincetoxicum (swallowwort). Vincetoxicum nigrum (also known by the name Cynanchum louiseae) is the most common species in New England and likely the one you have photographed. These plants can be quite invasive and are spreading around New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello there, I came across this beautiful grass yesterday. It is located in Salem Sound, Salem, MA. I am greatly hoping you are able to identify it for me! Thank you very much, SueLB
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, I believe you have photographed a species of Bromus (brome grass). Unfortunately, I can't see the spikelets closely enough to tell you which species this likely is. It may be Bromus ciliatus (fringed brome), a common species found in forests and along edges. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I moved into a new house about a year ago. There’s a mix of old plantings - some are native (clathrate) and some not (burning bush). The shrub pictured here is at at the edge of the driveway. I don’t remember flowers last year. No berries. The old leaves have a slightly spicy, scent when rubbed. Not quite bay, not quite piney resin. It retained some leaves over the winter but most dropped. Current height ranges from 2-5 ft. I want to make sure it is not invasive. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear mburch, good morning. You have photographed Morella caroliniensis (small bayberry). If you look with magnification, the leaf blades with be dotted with tiny, yellow resin-glands. This is a staminate (pollen-bearing) individual. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I'm wondering if this might be Hydrastis canadensis. Seen in a rocky, rich, mesic forest in Rowe, MA.
    Answer
    Dear sargetsi, good morning. These leaves look more like a species of Sanicula (sanicle, Apiaceae) than Hydrastis. To assist in the future, Hydrastis has lobed leaves, Sanicula has compound leaves (i.e., at least some sinuses go to or nearly to the center of the leaf blade). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Graminoid growing in open woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, this looks like Luzula multiflora (common wood-rush), a common species found throughout much of New England in forests but also along edges and in openings. It belongs to a complex of a few species, but it is by far the most common of the complex.
  • Question
    This small sedge has only one stem with flowers. I think it's Carex pensylvanica because some is growing a few hundred feet away. (See ask the botanist answer from May 14; that plant has no carpellate basal spikes hidden among leaves.) I was wondering if small individuals of species that normally have basal spikes might lack them, or if they are always present. Open woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts May 18, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, it is likely Carex pensylvanica or a closely related species--but until the perigynia are mature, it won't be possible to be 100% confident from the images uploaded here. The shape of the body (nearly globose in this group of species) is crucial for confirmation. I think you are on the right track. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The next few plants were all photographed today, May 16, 2020, next to a fast moving stream in a deep gorge in the town of Jamaica in southeastern Vermont. Unfortunately none of them are blooming yet, but I thought all of the leaves were fairly distinctive.
    Answer
    Dear beaconluke, there are no images associated with your question. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having difficulty uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org, I will try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have this houseplant I inherited from a friend but not sure of its name. I hope you can help me. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear rayrites, I'm sorry I can't help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Cultivated species can hail from all over the world and are extensively hybridized, making them difficult to identify without specializing in this group of plants. I hope you are able to find an answer to your question.
  • Question
    I encountered this woody plant with pinnately compound leaves on 2 different sites in the last 2 weeks (5/2 in Haverhill, NH; 5/16 in Lincoln, NH). In both cases they were on the sides of old logging roads. They look like they could be a Sambus species but I'm not aware that Red or Black Elderberry would be on the verge of flowering this early.
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, good morning. The plant you've photographed is Sambucus racemosa (red elderberry). It flowers early in the season (much ahead of Sambucus nigra). The flower buds are red-purple, but they will open up as white.
  • Question
    I found this in my local woods at the edge of a wooded wetlands area in Concord, MA. I couldn't find a good match in GoBotany. And checking my search engine for "five leaf whorl" didn't help. Can you ID this from the picture? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear allyncommercial@gmail.com, it looks like you have photographed Lysimachia punctata (large yellow-loosestrife). This species if frequently cultivated and sometimes escapes. The reddish color to the leaves will give way to green as the spring progresses. It has prominent yellow flowers that you can see on the Go Botany website. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Part of an early blooming sedge which I asked about in mid April. Is it getting to the stage where it can be identified?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, the pubescent perigynium with a short beak suggests this is either Carex pensylvanicum or C. umbellata. I don't have any habit shots or knowledge of basal spikes that are strictly carpellate (i.e., no staminate flowers on these basal stalks), so I can't go further than this. Hopefully you can examine the key to Carex section Acrocystis and determine which species it is between these two choices. Good luck.
  • Question
    Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Massachusetts. I was thinking Rubus (compound leaves, spines) but I did not find a convincing match in the key.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good afternoon. You have photographed a young plant of Rosa rugosa (rambler rose). This non-native species is identified at this stage by the fringed stipules (at the base of the leaf), as opposed to toothed stipules in other roses within New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Two plants with similar leaves growing next to each other. The smaller has red leaves, the larger has flowers. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Massachusetts. Edge of trail in woods.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you've photographed Berberis thunbergii (Thunberg's barberry). This species has entire leaves and simple spines (i.e., unbranched spines) at the nodes. There are other species of this genus in New England, but they toothed leaf margins and usually have some spines that are compound (i.e., branched).
  • Question
    Using the simple key I got to Barbarea vulgaris (yellow flowers, deeply lobed alternate leaves, and the ridged stem matches). Common in sunny places next to a trail (service road) in Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Massachusetts.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, Yes, the plant you photographed looks like Barbarea vulgaris (garden yellow-rocket). This is a non-native member of the Brassicaceae that flowers early in the season. It has edible leaves and flowers, and while extremely nutritious (as evidenced by testing), the leaves are bitter for most palates. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have some questions about sedge anatomy -- what are the proper names for the different parts of the flowering stalk? In the earlier picture there are two groups of flowers separated by stems. Are they two "spikelets"? There are two types of structures emerging from beneath the scales. (Is "scales" correct?) One is fairly straight and yellow, initially appearing as a pair of tubes joined together. Closer to the base the emerging structures are whitish, more flexible, and fuzzy.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good afternoon. You have photographed a staminate spike (spike with pollen-bearing flowers subtended by flat scales) and a carpellate spike (spike with ovule-bearing flowers subtended by two scales, a flat scale that you can see in the image and a sac-like scale--called a perigynium--that isn't visible yet. The yellow structures are anthers that contain pollen. The white structures that resemble pipe cleaners are the stigmatic surfaces of the carpel (below is the ovary, hidden by the scales). Let me know if you have other questions.
  • Question
    Can you tell what type of plant this is from the photo. Northeast- new york
    Answer
    Dear jogannon@outlook.com, good afternoon. The plant is most likely Potentilla simplex (old-field cinquefoil), a very common species in the northeast. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Do you know the name of this. Upstate new york
    Answer
    Dear jogannon@outlook.com, good morning. Unfortunately, the image is a little too small and taken from too far away for me to be confident. You appear to have photographed a species of Potentilla (cinquefoil), such as Potentilla simplex (old-field cinquefoil). If you want to provide more close-up images, I can try to confirm the species for you.
  • Question
    I'm very interested in nature and biodiversity photography where some of them I knew just its local names. So, I really wanted to know all the names of what I have taken.
    Answer
    Sophea, good morning. Without knowing where these images were taken (generally, such as the state or province), I won't be able to assist. Location information is vital for identification because there are upwards of 400,000 tracheophyte plant species on the planet, and my familiarity is primarily the northeastern portion of North America. Feel free to post, but please note where the species are from. You can also email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I can communicate further with you.
  • Question
    Tree in SE Massachusetts, about 25ft tall. Leaves seem to have hairs on both top and bottom. Flowers have a distinct sickly-sweet smell. I only have old dried-up fruits from the previous season to look at, but they're definitely fleshy and the interior looks somewhat like an apple, so I'm thinking some kind of crabapple? I think it seeded in naturally, but there's a chance it was planted intentionally. Any help with the ID would be greatly appreciated! Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Dendrolycopodium, you likely have photographed Malus baccata (Siberian crab apple). This species is one of the more commonly naturalized crab applies in New England. I can't be certain of the identification without seeing this plant in person, but it does look like this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Dear Botanist, I am hoping this pretty white violet can be identified. It is located in Salem Sound, Salem, MA Thank you, SueLB
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, it is likely you have found Viola x bissellii (Viola cucullata x V. sororia). This hybrid is one of the frequent nothospecies I see with white petals that have bluish tints (at least toward the center). It is not one of the usual white-flowered species, given the density of the hairs on the lateral petals and size of the petals. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good Afternoon Dr. I have taken pictures of what I believe to be Carpet Bugle, Ajuga reptans. I would appreciate your comments. Thank you in advance. PS this specimen was going in my lawn in Malden, MA.
    Answer
    califyank, good morning. Yes, I do believe you are correct. It looks much like Ajuga reptans, a plant that also grows on a portion of my lawn (planted by the previous home owner). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Dear Ace Botanist, This tiny purple flower (about a quarter inch) with round leaves olives in a garden in the middle of the woods in the North Quabbin area. Reminds us a bit of fringe polygala, but it isn't that. Thank you, as always, for your help!
    Answer
    Dear Tracy, good morning. The image is a little too small for me to provide you with a confident answer. It appears to be a violet (genus Viola), but I can't tell you which one. If you have a larger image, I can give you more assistance with the species name. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi!It's not often the GoBotany searches fail me, and it's driving me nuts not knowing what this is! Located in Sudbury, MA, edge of a wooded area. Tree form, slightly serrated leaf edges, mostly 3 leaves/cluster but more at tips/new growth. Reddish veining, upward curl, yellowish tinge to underside. White petioles, single red scale leaf bud. Exposed roots callous over white & smooth, similar to birch. Unique vertical veining along sapling trunks, orange tint to bark at joints / damage. Thanks!
    Answer
    Kamereone, good afternoon. Your tree looks like a cultivated species. Can you confirm this is a wild plant growing outside of cultivation? Feel free to email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so we can communicate further about your discovery. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Small tree growing beside a path in open woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts May 11 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you've photographed a species of Malus (flowering crab). It is likely either Malus baccata or Malus prunifolia, two of the more common crab apples that are found around in New England as naturalized plants. Fruit size is a good indicator which it is, as well as whether or not the sepals persist on the fruit (or not). Best wishes.
  • Question
    My plant: Pachira aquatica, recently shed its healthy leaves and wilted away. I was told it was overwatering which caused its stress. I have unplanted the plant from the pot dried it’s soil, let the roots air for 36 hrs and then I replanted it with minimal water and plant food. I am determined to nurse this plant back to good health. Please help, with instructions to nurse the plant to good health. Thank you in advance for your help.
    Answer
    Dear ParamveerSS, good morning. Go Botany is a website designed for wild plants of New England. If you would like help with cultivated species, contact nursery@NativePlantTrust.org. The folks in the nursery will have much better information than I have for helping you with your plant. Good luck!
  • Question
    Glenn here again. Here is a closer photo of the forget-me-not flower. Further info, I am in Easthampton, MA and this is a fairly moist area of my yard near a wetland. Thanks again!
    Answer
    Glenn, yes, Myosotis sylvatica. The hooked hairs on the calyx (sepals) separate this from specie slike Mysotis scorpioides, which have straight hairs lacking a hooked tip. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I bought a house with a crazy vine plant that the previous owner grew into a tree on a metal frame. Problem is the previous owners were deceased and i don't know what kind it is and how to care/maintain it. It's has to be 40-50 plus years old. Now my second problem is some kind of bug is killing it now as well. Here are some pictures of it in full bloom, after winter and a close up of the middle and the bug damage. I live in Ontario, Canada.
    Answer
    Dear Med, you have photographed a species of Isotrema (historically included in the genus Aristolochia). These go by the common name Dutchman's-pipe. You likely have either Isotrema macrophylla (which has the young stems and leaf underside devoid of hairs or with non-dense, very short hairs) or Isotrema tomentosa (with the young stems and leaf undersides with dense, woolly hairs). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! I would like to know which shrub is this? I found it in park of Varaždinske Toplice (Croatia). Thank you in advance!
    Answer
    Dear mikivica, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern North America). Plants from outside of this region cannot be known with confidence. You need to locate an herbarium (plant museum) near you who will have staff with expertise in the plants of your region. If you need help with this process, email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will assist further.
  • Question
    Hi Friend. I saw what appears to anemone canadensis in Canterbury, Merrimack Co, NH. It was next to a public trail on private land. I don't know whose land it was. Does that mean I can't share the photos with you? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Jelliottnh, I think you are welcome to share any images you would like. You never have to disclose the exact location. For many, just knowing the county or town within the state is very useful. If you are ever concerned about permissions for access, simply be somewhat ambiguous about the details you provide for the location and it is unlikely that anyone will be alarmed by the posts. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have these growing in my back yard. Seek ID's them in the Forget-Me-Not genus, but cannot ID the species. I know that the Scorpioides species is a banned invasive in MA, but there are other species that are not invasive. Do you know what species it is? If it's not the invasive species, I will leave it there as it actually is nice looking. If it is the invasive species, then I definitely want to get rid of it. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Glenn, good morning. I can't tell you for certain who this is, but it looks like Myosotis sylvatica(woodland forget-me-not). I would need to see the hairs on the sepals (through a nice, close-up photograph) to be certain. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have this growing next to my driveway in Massachusetts. It looks like it wants to grow up into a tree and it would be too close to the driveway. If it's a native species I'll try to transplant it farther away. There is some Quercus coccinea nearby. Other native trees in the area include red oaks, white oaks, maples, Populus, hickory, birch, and dogwood. There are also non-native ornamental shrubs and small trees.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. I can't fully answer your question, but you certainly have an oak in the black oak group (e.g., Quercus rubra, Quercus velutina, Quercus coccinea). We would need fully expanded leaves (at a miminum) to find a confident answer. But, it is very likely a native species.
  • Question
    The brown structures that look like open pine cones puzzled me at first, but they must be an unfamiliar-to-me form of the galls made by Rabdophaga gall midges on Salix. I don't remember seeing flowers on this tree over the course of a year. Perhaps they are inconspicuous. Lincoln, Massachusetts May 6, 2020 in wet ground next to pond.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed a species of Alnus (alder). The structures you spoke about are the carpellate aments (fruit-bearing catkins), which have woody scales in this genus, overall resembling a seed cone. I can't tell you which species of Alnus you have photographed without additional images, but hopefully knowing the genus will be useful.
  • Question
    I recently posted last year's flowers of this tree and they were not clear enough to identify. Here are better pictures, taken May 4-5 2020 in Lincoln, Massachusetts. The tree is at the south edge of a clearing. Once the other trees leaf out it will only get a little direct sunlight when the sun is high.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. We are getting closer. I think you have either Prunus avium (sweet cherry) or Prunus cerasus (sour cherry). You can likely determine for yourself which species this is. The former has sepals with entire margins and pubescent leaf blades (on the lower surface), while the latter has sepals with glandular-serrate margins and +/- glabrous leaf surfaces.
  • Question
    This young tree has spherical galls similar to ones I've seen on white oak, so that's my guess. Lincoln, Massachusetts May 5 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, I believe you are correct. This plant looks like Quercus alba (eastern white oak). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I recently moved to Middlesex County, Massachusetts. I have two plants I am seeing in the woods behind my home that I would like help identifying. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear SNB96P, the first image may be Tussilago farfara (coltsfoot). The leaf blades should have a rubbery feeling and have lots of gray hairs on the undersurface. The second image may be Eurybia divaricata (white wood-aster). This is a common species of forests and forest borders. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This tree is growing in my yard in Massachusetts. I've been calling it an unknown hickory. Can species be determined at this stage of growth?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, not yet. I could narrow it down to a couple of species (perhaps), but it would be best to wait for expanded leaves and fruits (if possible).
  • Question
    A shrub growing out of a crack in a rock. Open woods, Lincoln Massachusetts May 5, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, I believe you have photographed a small plant of Celastrus orbiculatus (Oriental bittersweet). I can make out a slightly raised, decurrent ridge connecting every other node (which is a feature of this species). The expanding leaves look correct as well.
  • Question
    I think at 2.5 meters tall, with flowers and leaves emerging at the same time, and located in Middlesex County, Massachusetts this has to be Vaccinium corymbosum. The key requires mature leaves and fruit. The shrub is in the middle of the distant shot in front of the straight tree leaning slightly left. It is at the edge of a clearing.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, yes, again, I do believe this to be Vaccinium corymbosum. The coetaneous flowering limits this to V. corymbosum or C. caesariense, but the latter is much less common. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Between road and woods, Lincoln, Massachusetts. Vaccinium angustifolium?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. Yes, I do believe you have photographed Vaccinium angustifolium. It is about to flower here in the western part of ME where I live. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! I was walking along a small stream in my backyard in Connecticut and saw these small leaves growing underneath a bush a few feet away from the stream. Any idea what they are? I just thought they were pretty and wanted to know what they were.
    Answer
    Dear Jordan, the leaves you have photographed belong to vegetative plants of Erythronium americanum (American trout-lily). This is a common, native, spring ephemeral plant that will produce beautiful yellow flowers at maturity. The leaves will be gone in a couple of months as the plant goes dormant very early.
  • Question
    Dear sir, I found a series of plants in a small lake or pond near home in Kommu Banda Thanda, Telangana, India. I recently started research on the use of plants in strengthening and reinforcing soil in a water body. So please provide me with the names of these plant to continue my research in order.
    Answer
    Dear bhukyapavan33, good morning. I'm sorry, I can't assist you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. I do not have expertise in Indian plants. You need to locate an herbarium (plant museum) closer to you to find people who would have expertise in the plants of your region. Good luck.
  • Question
    Hi there, I found this in the woods near Stowe/Underhill, VT yesterday, May 2, 2020, and I couldn't find it in your database - but maybe I missed it. Can you help me identify it? Six-petaled, maroon, yellow interior, brown/purple leaves. Thanks, Amanda
    Answer
    Dear AmandaVT, you have photographed Caulophyllum giganteum (early blue cohosh). This species usually shows six prominent purple petals, six famller, fan-shaped petals that are thickened near the rounded apex, and then the yellow stamens (pollen-bearing structures) you see in the center. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello there, This beautiful plant randomly grows in my friends' yard up in the Lakes Region of N.H. She gave me a plant to grow in Massachusetts. I am very excited... and looked through many plant books to find what this may be. I am hoping that you can simply ID it by the leaves. A cutworm took off one of the leaves. Thank You, SueLB
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, I don't know what species this is. It reminds me of seedlings of Anemone multifida that I have seen, but this is a regionally rare species (that is sometimes cultivated). I cannot be confident until the plants are larger. Sorry I can't assist.
  • Question
    Dear Ace Botanist, I am wondering what this creeping, three-leaved, spiney invasive ivy is in my yard? The tiny spines on the runners distinguish it from the considerably less obnoxious wild strawberry which also grows here. I'm in central Massachusetts just west of the Quabbin reservoir facing north. Thanks for your answer!
    Answer
    Dear Tracy, good morning. You have photographed a native blackberry called Rubus hispidus (bristly blackberry). It is a trailing species with evergreen, lustrous leaves (each with 3 leaflets) and bristly stems. It will produce small blackberries. Enjoy.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr. I am hoping that can identify the images below. I recognize that it belongs to the mustard family. It has inflorescence similar to Cardamine ssp but the base leaves consists of a rosette typical of Draba ssp. Also, the ovary forms a silique similar to Cardamine ssp. I would appreciate you assessment. As always, thank you for your expertise!
    Answer
    Ed, Aribidopsis thalliana, has you determined from your review of this plant. Beautiful images, thank you for sharing.
  • Question
    Good evening again Dr. I am happy to report that I have been able to identify the mystery mustard, Arabidopsis thaliana. The pics in WoNE did not have the detail I needed although it did show the rosette, the images of the flowers were inconclusive. Hope all is well with your family, best wishes. Ed
    Answer
    I'm glad to read this Ed. Thank you for letting me know how it ended up being identified. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found near road where water flows. Leaves were spread around the base; whorled like.
    Answer
    Howard, you have photographed a species of Rumex (dock). I cannot tell you which species from the leaves alone. Hopefully knowing the genus will be useful to you and get you started on your study of this plant.
  • Question
    Small little plant on a bed of moss near riverside in central mass. Older leaves tinged purple. Leaves have small hairs.
    Answer
    Howard, good morning. This may be a species of Hieracium (hawkweed), though I would need more information to be certain. There are some species in New England that have the purple tinging that is displayed in the images you have uploaded. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in western mass; I think it is a serviceberry. Tree was small, around 15' covered in lichen. Leaves are tinged red. Which looks to be different than serviceberry. So, unsure.
    Answer
    Dear Howard, good morning. Based on the red-tinged leaves and absence of hairs on the pedicels, this is likely Amelanchier laevis (smooth shadbush), a relatively common species that produces the largest flowers of any of our shadbushes. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Plant ID; found along roadside in western mass. Purple tonged base. Mamy leaves attached to stem.
    Answer
    Dear Howard, there is a single image uploaded, of the base of a stem of a perennial plant. However, I can't see expanded leaves, flowers, etc. Without more information, I can't assist you. I'm sorry.
  • Question
    Plant ID; found along riverside in western mass; I assume it is quite common in New England. 5 leaflets; serrated. Stem is purple tinged as is underside of leaves. I'ts a small plant.
    Answer
    Dear Howard, there is no image associated with your question. Without one, I will have a difficult time assisting you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to mail it directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here’s the second of my three plant ID requests from our yard in Portsmouth NH. Found in wooded area near wet area and wooded area long the road. It is woody and looks like it is segmented or something with a bud at the end. Hopefully you can see it camouflaged in with the leaves. If it helps any, we do have lots of invasives and poison ivy and we also have a lot of very young shagbark hickory saplings. Not sure if this plant falls into any of these options. Thank you for your help.
    Answer
    Dear Maryanne, you may have found Toxicodendron rydbergii (western poison-ivy). This species is a short shrub that does not climb into/onto trees as does Toxicodendron radicans. The reddish winter buds this time of year are often a good field mark to help avoid dense areas where these plants grow.
  • Question
    Last one from our yard in Portsmouth NH. This picture was taken now (late April) and is in the woods and along the edge of the woods where the lawn begins in our yard. It seems like it spreads underground by a long root/rhizome type thing. Lots of it popping up. Any thoughts? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Maryanne, it looks like a species of Solidago (goldenrod). It would be difficult for me to confidently tell you which species without flowers/fruits, but hopefully knowing the genus will be useful to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this from red oak? I've seen them around the woods in Lincoln, Massachusetts the last few days. The wind has been strong enough that I can't associate them with individual trees. One was under a dogwood. But red oak is common.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, those look like the expanding flowers of Acer saccharum. They emerge early, have yellow petals and pubescent pedicels. The flowers of Quercus rubra are more elongated and do not have obvious perianth (i.e., sepals and petals).
  • Question
    This plant, which I suspect is a Gallium, has a prominent purplish tinge. Is it G. Molluga? Is G. Molluga edible?
    Answer
    Dear whbn3, it does look to belong to the Galium mollugo complex, though I can't say for certain it isn't Galium album or G. sylvaticum without flowers. These species are not the typical ones used for early spring greens (such as Galium aparine), which is a more distantly related species.
  • Question
    Hi Arthur, I'm torn between if this is Viola sororia or Viola sagitatta. It was growing in my yard on a wetland edge. The leaves seem pretty heart-shaped, but aren't very long-stalked. The leaves and stalks are very pubescent and the petal hairs are very long. Thanks for any help!
    Answer
    Dear saxophone777, I don't know where this violet was photographed (state or province), so that puts us at a disadvantage for identifying your violet. One thing that I can see is that the sepals are ovate and relatively blunt (those of Viola sagitatta are narrower and more sharply pointed at the apex). While the leaves have characteristics of Viola sagitata, they are not typical. This could be a hybrid between two the species, but I would need additional images of the fully expanded leaves and a close-up of the sepals to be certain. Best wishes.
  • Question
    For the last few years I have been trying to ID Salix flowers, but as forewarned on Go Botany, this is proving to be difficult. Can you thiverify this plant, I came up with S. candida. - Bruce
    Answer
    Dear Bruce, Good afternoon. Identifying willows from their flowers is difficult--but it is far harder to due from a photograph. This is complicated further without knowing the natural community this willow was found within. Can you email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org so that we might discuss where you found this and examine additional images that you may have? We can probably come to an answer, but I need a bit more information. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I found this plant near a woodland in Dumaguete City in central philippines. I have not seen anything of this kind . Although it looks similar to Trident Maple but the Philippines is a rain forest. Could you please help me identify this tree? Thank you. Lorenc
    Answer
    Dear Lorenc, I'm sorry I can't assist you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. You need to locate (online or in person) an herbarium (plant museum) closer to your area where there will be people familiar with the flora of the region. Good luck!
  • Question
    Hello, Could you please help me ID a few plants found in our yard in Portsmouth NH? This first one I found near the edge of a wooded area in our yard. There is a large patch of these plants that have leaves that look like maple leaves. My first thought was Viburnum acerifolium. Any thoughts? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Maryanne, good morning. You have photographed a species of Ribes (currant, gooseberry). I can't tell you which one without close-up images of the leaves and (once they appear) images of the flowers. However, I hope that knowing the genus will be of assistance to you. You will note these have alternate leaves (if it were Viburnum acerifolium, it would have opposite leaves).
  • Question
    Unlike the sedges in more shaded areas, this one is a dense clump with flowers no higher than leaves. Lincoln, Massachusetts April 26, 2020.
    Answer
    jfc, this one is just too early for me to tell you much. I wish I could help, but I will need you to photograph it later in the season. Also, I will need ecological information (i.e., what habitat is it growing in).
  • Question
    What is this plant?
    Answer
    Dear Anaruiz, you appear to have photographed a species of Begonia (common name is also "begonia"). These are plant primarily from tropical and subtropical regions of the world that are cultivated as house plants. There are many species and I do not know which one you have. Hopefully, knowing the genus will be of assistance to you.
  • Question
    There are several of these growing along the Town Bog in Lee NH - upland from the bog. The leaves are opposite and have finely toothed margins. The habit reminds of of a dogwood, but I just can't i.d. it. thank you
    Answer
    Cear catherine, good morning. I'm not able to see the images clearly enough to give you a confident answer (in one of the images, the focus is on a trunk behind the leaves). It looks like a species of Viburnum (such as nannyberry, Viburnum lentago), but I would need more images to confirm that for you. Sorry I can't fully help you with your question, but if you can acquire some more images, I will be able to assist.
  • Question
    I have this in CT and my mom has it on Minnesota. Can't identify. ??? Good or bad?
    Answer
    Dear mkkettle, good morning. You have photographed Petasites japonicus (Japanese sweet-coltsfoot). This species flowers early in the year and then will produce massive leaves later, after the flowers are gone. Can you please let me know if these plants are planted or are growing wild? I can be reached at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. Thank you!
  • Question
    I took this picture in the Alpine Garden on Mount Washington, June 20, 2013. I didn't take a picture of the whole plant, only the flower. The AMC field guide has a Geum and a Potentilla with similar yellow flowers.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, this flower most likely belongs to Geum peckii (White Mountain avens). This species is a near endemic of NH, but is locally common on Mount Washington. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Our family has recently started renovations on my boyfriend's family farm situated on 150 acres in central NY. There are soooo many plants and I want to know about them all. Let's start with these, found growing near a large leek patch. My questions are what are they? Can they be used medicinally or for food and if so how and what benefits do they provide? Thanks in advance.
    Answer
    Dear WhiskeyHollowmama, the purple plants in your image are Caulophyllum thalictroides (blue cohosh), a native member of the barberry family. The coloration you see is very typical on emergence for this species. This species has historically been used (and continues to be used) as a uterine tonic, to assist with managing painful cramps, and to both promote labor and deliver the placenta. In some circles, it would be generally referred to as a gynecological aid. The roots and rhizomes (underground portions, which are rich in terpenes and alkaloids, are the portions used--but proper training is advised. Best wishes!
  • Question
    A small shrub growing in a dry part of Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Concord, Massachusetts. Flowers but no leaves yet.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed a species of Amelenchier (shadbush). These are early-flowering members of the rose family with white flowers arranged in a raceme with five styles per flower. I can't see the ovary summit; therefore, I can't be certain of which species you have encountered. Hopefully, knowing the genus will get you started on your study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    i'm perplexed as to what is wrong with my holly bushes. attached is photo. i put 7-dust on to help with the black flies that have been on them. i would be grateful for any information. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear jrussell927, good morning. I've communicated with our horticulturalist, and he provides this response for you. "This is a classic example of hard frost damage on tender, newly emerged foliage. Coaxed out by early warm temps (and non native like this Ilex cornuta 'Burfordii' are prone to do it) the new shoots are not hardened off and susceptible to frost damage. You can prune off the tips and the plant should send out new shoots when the weather is warmer."
  • Question
    Hello, Could you please help me with my school project? I have to study the germination process day after day and investigate several factors that influence this process. So I planted (red) radish seeds and I noticed that some of my plants have a purple leaf. Could you please explain why? (location: Belgium). Thanks in advance.
    Answer
    Naima248, I don't know for certain the answer to your question--but I do know that some species here in New England produce various red pigments on early leaves to promote frost tolerance in the leaves. The pigments lower the temperature at which leaves can be tolerant to frost. This is only one possible reason for the red leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have some of this popping up around my house in Massachusetts. I didn't plant it but maybe the previous owner did.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed Cardamine hirsuta (hairy bitter-cress), a member of the mustard family. The abundant basal leaves are a good field character, and the flowers of this species usually only produce four stamens (instead of six).
  • Question
    I have a patch of this outside the house I bought a couple years ago. I don't know if it's an ornamental or growing wild.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, it looks like the leaves of Achillea (yarrow). There are native and cultivated species (some of which naturalize) here in New England. If it flowers, we can determine which species you have. Best wishes.
  • Question
    In the woods in Lincoln, Massachusetts, April 28, 2019. This is a distant picture of a branch over 20 feet in the air.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, I'm sorry, but I simply can't see the flowers and expanding leaves clearly enough to offer a good answer. This time of year, most of the early flowering Rosaceae belong to the genus Prunus or the genus Amelanchier. I will need more details and a closer image to assist you fully.
  • Question
    Thanks for replying back. If you could assist me in finding a local botanist who can help me with identifying the species of the bamboo I shared, I shall be very grateful. Thanks in advance. Plus, You guys are amazing. Love ya all Dr. Zahid
    Answer
    Dear Dr. Zahid, good morning. If you visit this URL: http://sweetgum.nybg.org/science/ih/ , and type in "Pakistan" to the country text box, you will receive a number of institutions that may have experts in the grass you asked me about. Each link is an herbarium (plant museum) and contact information will be provided so you can reach out and send images to local botanists in your area. Good luck and best wishes.
  • Question
    I saw this plant yesterday in SE Vermont along a trail in a mixed hardwood forest. The leaves looked like an emerging two-leaved toothwort plant but the two leaves were dark red , not green. Unfortunately I did not get a photo. Could this have been toothwort and the leaves later turn green?
    Answer
    Dear patashields, good morning. The emerging leaves of Cardamine diphylla (two-leaved toothwort) are frequently red. And, yes, they gradually change to green as the spring advances. Many plants have pigments in the leaves at this time of year that offer frost tolerance to protect against cold nights in the spring. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I saw this plant in a central Massachusetts woodland the other day and I would love to know what it is. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Scryerwood, good afternoon. You have photographed Pyrola americana (American shinleaf), a native member of the heath family. This species sometimes shows the light colored veins (as in your picture), but further north it frequently does not show this coloration (the entire leaf blade is green). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! Could anyone tell me what species are these two plants?
    Answer
    Dear toon, good afternoon. You have some cultivated species of plants, the one being two species of cacti grafted to each other (sometimes called moon cactus yellow). I'm sorry I can't assist any further as Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Some cultivated species are outside of my realm of expertise. Best wishes and good luck.
  • Question
    Growing at the edge of a stream in the alpine tundra of Mount Washington, June 20, 2013. Is it Veratrum?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, yes, this is Veratrum viride. It is not uncommon in wet, protected environments, such as seeps and rivulets in high-elevate gullies or low areas on the plateaus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Woodland area but I can’t identify this !
    Answer
    Dear K. corbin, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help you with your question. Location is really important data for plant identification because it eliminates species that don't occur in a particular state, province, or region. If you can, please always provide a general location of where your images are photographed so I can assist you better. Hope you are well.
  • Question
    Hello, walking trail area near Farmington River in Farmington, CT. This caught my eye because of the deep red against the moss background. This was basically below water run-off and the area was mossy. This was the only clump I noticed along a two mile path with intermittent wet/dry sections. Thank you, L. White
    Answer
    Dear LesAnne+20, these are the early emerging shoots of Reynoutria (winged-knotweed). Included in this genus are species like Japanese winged-notweed. They are sometimes quite reddish on emergence. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Sedge growing in an occasionally sunlit spot next to a tree in the woods in Lincoln, Massachusetts.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, this looks like a member of Carex section Acrocystis. These are early flowering species that will need the mature perigynia for identification.
  • Question
    On Mount Washington not far below tree line (above 4,000 feet) July 27, 2013. I have heard suggestions of Erechites and Solidago sensu lato.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, this is Solidago macrophylla (large-leaved goldenrod). It is a typical component of high-elevation subalpine forests in New England. It just needs some openings or sparse canopy in places to get an area where it doesn't compete with dense woody plant growth. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Sedge growing in the woods in Lincoln, Massachusetts. It wasn't bothered by a late snow. Photos April 18-19, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed (in all likelihood) a member of section Acrocystis. These are early-flowering sedges (in fact, the earliest in most locations in New England). Examples of species in this section include Carex pensylvanicum and C. lucorum (most likely you have photographed one of these species). Once their perigynia mature, it will be possible to discern which one of these you have photographed.
  • Question
    I would like to understand the internal workings that cause a tree to produce pollen. Is there a hormone that is up/down regulated that starts this part of their life cycle? Much google scholar/wiki searching has come up short. Seen in Red Cedar and Live Oak. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear dentalstudent, good morning. Here are a couple of articles that may supply some of the information you are seeking. 1: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4498206/. 2: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2708932/. The latter one discusses the importance of cell signaling and has some additional references that may be of use. Happy reading.
  • Question
    Hello, I have got fond of planting bamboos recently. There is this one bamboo kind that I bought at a local nursery and I want to know if this is the kind I want in my garden. I am a doctor by profession and I studied identification points but it requires more detailed knowledge. So it brought me to ask you if you could help me in identifying the species of the bamboo I have grown. Pics are provided. I shall be very grateful Thank you. Loc:Pakistan
    Answer
    Dear Taurasturi, good morning. I'm sorry that I cannot help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. Pakistan is a long way from my region of expertise. I suggest you contact a local plant museum (herbarium) to find local botanists with expertise in your region. If you need assistance locating them, let me know and I can assist.
  • Question
    My calla lily's white leaf covering over the bud has turned brown, it's outside planted in a container. What am I doing wrong???
    Answer
    Dear Jonathan, good morning. You may not be doing anything wrong. The spathe (the leaf you refer to) doesn't stay white permanently, but after pollination of the flowers will eventually senesce. I don't know enough details about your situation to know if this is merely a timing thing or if the plant is needing additional items to remain healthy. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Lincoln, Massachusetts. A survey of nearby wetlands reported Dendrolycopodium obscurum there. This is a drier location. I don't really understand the difference between obscurum and hickeyi.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, this appears to be Dendrolycopodium obscurum. The difference between it and D. hickeyi are easier to see (at first) when they are both together so the differences are more obvious. In D. obscurum, the trophophylls (i.e., vegetative leaves) on the underside of the lateral branches are shorter and/or more appressed to the branch, so that the overall branch cross-section is elliptic or plano-convex (when you draw a line connecting the tips of the trophophylls to form a polygon). In D. hickeyi, all the trophyophylls on the lateral branches are equal size and have similar orientation, giving the branch a roughly circular cross-section. I don't know if this helps. I have images I can send you directly--feel free to email me and I'll try to make sure you understand these two species.
  • Question
    At the edge of a trail in the woods in Lincoln, Massachusetts. Leaves coming out on April 11, 2020. Last year I saw a Berberis, probably thunbergii, along a road about a quarter mile away. Is this another?
    Answer
    Dear jfc, yes, I believe you are correct. This looks like Berberis thunbergii. The entire leaves and simple spines suggest this identification. Great picture.
  • Question
    Something green coming up in a field in Rock Meadow (park), Belmont, Massachusetts on April 12, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, you have photographed a species of Urtica (stinging nettle). I can't tell you which one from the photograph provided, but hopefully knowing the genus will be useful to you.
  • Question
    Small tree growing along a trail in Beaver Brook Reservation (north), Waltham, Massachusetts April 12, 2020.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. You have photographed pollen-bearing flowers of Lindera benzoin (northern spicebush). This is a native shrub that is often associated with stream shores, swamps, and forested seeps. If you bruise a small section of a branch, you will get a strong, +/- lemon-like odor. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi there, this plant has me stumped. It was located at the top of Bare Mountain in Amherst, on dry exposed rock with thin soil. Any help in identification would be appreciated! Thanks, Emily
    Answer
    Dear emilymaglegy, you have photographed a species of Spergula (spurry), a member of the Caryophyllaceae. On this mountain grows Spergula morrisonii (if memory serves me--I have seen these plants there where you visited). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello there, I am looking for the dried fruit of the common Rue. Do you know where I can purchase these from? Thank you, Melika
    Answer
    Dear Melikayazd, good morning. Sorry, I cannot help you with your question. I don't purchase dried rue fruit, and can't provide any recommendations of where you should purchase it. I wish I could be of assistance.
  • Question
    Greetings! This shrub 3 feet high is in my dampish yard, wooded north hillside east of the Connecticut River in the North Quabbin region. Purple marble-sized cluster flower, opposite, compound toothed leaves. In bloom now, has been for a few weeks. I cannot find it in Petersons Trees & Shrubs or any of my wildflower guides. Uploading 2 photos of flower. Many thanks for solving this mystery!
    Answer
    Dear Tracy, good morning. The shrub you have photographed is Sambucus racemosa (red elderberry). It flowers early in the spring, much ahead of our black elderberry, that flowers later in the growing season. The flowers will be white when fully expanded, and the fruits will be red.
  • Question
    hello, im in ohio, and found this in the woods while gathering wild onions. its 2 leaves are smooth yet slightly rubbery, it has a dark red stalk almost the color of red velvet cake, the bottom of it has the skin of an onion and the inner parts of one as well, i found it growing in a patch.
    Answer
    Dear marriedhunter56, good morning. You may have found Allium tricoccum (wild leek). I can't see some of the plant from the image, so my answer here is a little tentative. You should find a fibrous, netted covering over the bulb in this species (when freshly unearthed from the ground). A strong onion/garlic odor should also accompany this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, these weeds are growing in the lawn of one of my clients. It is located on Cape Cod. I thought it was black mustard, Brassica nigra but the more I look at it, the less confident I am of my ID. Any help would be appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear Tim1127, this plant looks like a species of Barbarea (yellow rocket). It is most likely Barbarea vulgaris, a very common, early spring flowering mustard with yellow flowers and pinnately compound leaves. It occurs in a variety of habitats, including lawns.
  • Question
    Hope you can help out with the identification of this plant Location is Central Ma. (Worcester County) habitat, woodland area near a small stream. There were no buds visible at this time.
    Answer
    Dear annieg, good morning. I am not certain of your plant, but it looks like Rubus repens (synonym: Dalibarda repens), known as dewdrop. This is a native member of the rose family that belongs to the same genus as raspberries. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Habitat: Terrestrial (open area). Location: Gedu (Bhutan) GPS: 26.915727*N, 89.526693*E. Elevation: 2065 masl. Request: Help me identify
    Answer
    Dear Pasang., good morning. I am not familiar with the plant of Bhutan. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. That written, the species you photographed may be Silybum marianum (milk-thistle). I recommend you start there with your study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have been trying to identify this shrub (or small multi-stemmed tree) since I moved into my new house late last summer. Smooth gray bark, simple leaves. I now see white flowers emerging from What I thought a month ago were pussy willow catkins.
    Answer
    Dear Claflins4, the shrub you have photographed looks like Magnolia stellata (star magnolia). This species has winter buds with conspicuous yellow-brown hairs that open to reveal the +/- white flowers within. The flowers appear well before the leaves expand. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I was wondering if anyone knew what this plant was. It was found in northern Virginia, in a wetland area at the beginning of April. From searching the web, it seems somewhat similar to Onoclea sensibilis but none of the pictures of that have the red rim seen on the leaves. Any help is appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear Coleybug, you appear to have photographed Onoclea sensibilis. The ones you have shared here are relatively young with still expanding leaves. Many plants display different colors as they are unfolding and perhaps this explains the color you see. Beautiful images, thank you for sharing them.
  • Question
    Good evening Dr. While walking through the local cemetery April 7th I encountered clusters of small white flowers. Physically the flowers appear similar to Pseudognaphalium ssp. I would appreciate your thoughts. Thank you in advance.
    Answer
    Dear califyank, this is a species of Antennaria (pussytoes), members of the Asteraceae. I can't tell you which species you have without additional images of the key features. But, it can be narrowed down to Antennaria howellii or A. neglecta. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can anyone identify this? It’s located in Rochester, New York.
    Answer
    Dear judyhartmann, good morning. Yes, I'm certain someone can identify it. However, that may not be me at this stage of the plant's growth. This looks like it may be a cultivated species, which is outside of my range of expertise. If it flowers later in the growing season, I should be able to point you in the right direction (even if cultivated). Sorry I can't be of more help now.
  • Question
    Hi, this is blooming right now (first week of April) under an oak tree at the edge of a dry wooded area behind our back yard in Tolland County, Connecticut. Not sure if it is a native wildflower or something that may have escaped from someone's garden at one time. Thank you for your help!
    Answer
    Dear DavidJ, good morning. You have photographed what appears to be Scilla luciliae (synonym: Chionodoxa luciliae), called Lucile's glory-of-the-snow. It is an early-flowering member of the hyacinth family. This species does naturalize from time to time, but primarily persists from old gardens. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this was observed in late summer in Somerset County, Maine. The plant was observed along a road ditch. The plant was a small shrub 4-5 feet in height. My assumption would be Kalmia angustifolia, however the light blue color and dense hair on the leaves would suggest otherwise. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, good morning. Kalmia anguistifolia would have whorled leaves (in threes at each node), but this species has alternate leaves, so good to question the initial hypothesis. This is Rhododendron canadense (rhodora), a common species in much of ME with the beautiful, pubescent, often pinkish capsules that you photographed. Wonderful images.
  • Question
    Hello, this abundant plant is found in slow moving forest streams in S.E. CT. The plant is aquatic and flattens outward to form almost a mat. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, you have photographed Chrysosplenium americanum (golden-saxifrage), a native member of the saxifrage family. It is frequent in small brooks and seeps within (often) forested settings. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! This is growing in my daughter’s backyard in Medway, MA. Photo taken on 4/5/2020. Can you help us identify it? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear JayneM, good morning. I don't recognize your plant--this appears to be a perennial species that is planted. It suggests a member of the hyacinth family, and you might want to continue your research there. Good luck.
  • Question
    I found a patch of what I thought might be Toxicodendron rydbergii. Its form was shrubby and upright with no aerial roots. Drupes appeared glabrous and, although fruit in March can't give an accurate number of flowers, most clusters were significantly fewer than 25 (most fewer than 12-15). The drupes were pedicellate, which is inconsistent with T. rydbergii - but none of the images of T. rydbergii fruit I found online - including on Go Botany - appear to be sessile. Can you explain? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear stephradner, good morning. The flowers/fruits of Toxicodendron rydbergii are usually pedicellate, just shortly so. Your images are consistent with this species. Beautiful photographs, the habit shot demonstrates this species' growth form very well. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I came accross this growing in the middle of a river at Perdanales State Park in Central Texas about 45 miles West of Austin. I've been in Texas for 45 years and never recall seeing this. Not sure if it is native or not. The boanists around here are stuped. Any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear swtexan, try comparing images/specimens of Ricinus communis (a member of the Euphorbiaceae). The palmately lobed leaves with mesifixed petioles is a good marker for this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good morning, Here is another picture of the flowers of my mistery plant. They have a yellow tint before they open. Let me know if this helps. Thank you for your assistance. Julian.
    Answer
    Dear Julianmoran, good morning. I'm sorry, but I do not recognize this plant. While it does look like a member of the Asteraceae, I can not yet make a match to any wild species in New England.
  • Question
    Hello. I think this is Lonicera morrowii (Morrow's Honeysuckle). Do you agree or do you think it's something else? seen in a NY woods. quite a lot of it. thank you in advance.
    Answer
    Dear dcmmings, while it is hard to be super confident with the emerging leaves, the pubescence on the leaf blades and young branchlets, as well as the hollow pith, all suggest this is Lonicera morrowii. Best wishes to you.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr. I am hoping that you can steer me in the right direction. Last year I observed rosette of leaves in a neighbor's yard and have not been able to identify the plant. The pubescence was impressive, but I have been unable to find a similar image on the web. Thank you in advance for you help :o)
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good morning. You have photographed a species of Pilosella (king-devil), a non-native member of the Asteraceae. These were included in the genus Hieracium in the Flora Novae Angliae manual, but have been shown to be a distinct lineage. You may have Pilosella caespitosa (synonym: Hieracium caespitosum), but without flowers I can't be certain. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Posting a sighting. First time. Not sure where to indicate its location or how to put a pin on the map. How do I do this? Found in Chelsea, VT on 3-21-2020. Public land.
    Answer
    Dear mjcdodie, good morning. This is the section to ask questions about the identification, ecology, or geography of wild plants. You won't find a section to post the location here. You need to go the post a sighting section of Plant Share, which will allow you to post this beautiful Equisetum scirpoides plant that you have photographed. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am not quite sure from your response if you were unable to identify my plant. It is from New England. I live in Maine. It originated from my yard where I got the soil from. I was told that it was a Asteraceae...
    Answer
    Dear julianmoran, good morning. I am not able to identify your plant. If it flowers, I may have more success. Keep watching it and send me an image if it does. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, This small colony of aquatic plants was found in SE CT in a freshwater forested wetland. The plant had heavily dissected leaves. It appears that there are two types of leaves, very fine, hairlike and wider leaves with a single central vein. My opinion would be Ranunculus flabellaris. This was found in early March and there were no flowers present.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, Good afternoon. I believe you are correct, that this plant is Ranunculus flabellaris (greater yellow water crowfoot). The alternate leaves with flattened blade segments are a good clue to its identification.
  • Question
    Hi again, this herbaceous plant was observed in a freshwater forested wetland. Located among "mounds" of sphagnum. This plant was found in mid-March (SE CT). Based on the leaf shape and thick waxy leaf, i would assume this is an early season Caltha palustris. However the C. palustris seems to grow more in clumps than dispersed stems.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, these look like the basal leaves of Cardamine pratensis (pink cuckoo bitter-cress), a member of the mustard family. If correct, it will produce pinnately compound leaves and four-petaled flowers that are white to pink. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This may be too early in the season for proper ID, but the time of year, growth habit and habitat seemed unique. In late Feb. this grass was growing in a very shallow pool in a freshwater wetland. The leaves were 12" in length and less than a CM wide. The tips were rounded. Found in SE CT.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich11, I'm not sure what you are looking at, the images are not very large, so it is hard to see details. They may be a species of Glyceria (manna grass) with floating leaves. You might want to see if the sheaths are closed (i.e., with fused margins most of their length) to confirm the genus. Good luck.
  • Question
    This is a tree in NY. opposite, slightly hairy buds, new growth is green, three bundle scars. i thought it might be a maple, but they mostly have glabrous buds. seen in woodland area. Any ideas? thank you.
    Answer
    Dear dcmmings, good afternoon. You have photographed Acer negundo (ash-leaved maple). This species often shows the bloom (white material) on the branchlet surface, which you can see in some of your images. Thanks for providing a nice series of photographs to assist me in helping you.
  • Question
    Good Afternoon from New York! I couldn't find another website that was as thorough, so I'm hoping that even though you're New England based, I thought you might still be able to help me. I'm absolutely no botanist. I bought a plant from a local BJ's store and it was labeled as a succulent. But I'm not quite sure it is. I was hoping you would be able to help me identify it so I can best take care of it. I scoured the internet but I'm still not positive what it is. Thank you for your help!
    Answer
    Dear lmjustonia, What a beautiful plant. However, I'm sorry that I cannot help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we will entertain any plant-related questions, there are many cultivated species that are outside of realm of expertise. Keep us in mind for wild plants, you are quite correct that NY is very similar to New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you identify this plant. It grew in my Aloe Vera pot as well as in my Hyssop pot I had transplanted indoors for the winter. It is now up to 3 feet tall. the entire plant has thin hairs. The seeds look like and blow around as dandelion ones do. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear julianmoran, good afternoon. I'm sorry that I cannot help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we will entertain any plant-related questions, there are many cultivated species that are outside of realm of expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This woody plant was doing its best to hold the dune at Sandy Point beach on Plum Island in Ipswich, MA. The first photo shows the winter bud from an adjacent similar plant since compromising the dune for a closer view wasn’t an option. My First guess was Prunus maritime from the overlapping scales, acuteness of its shape. The reddish hue bark had some longitudinal lenticular tissue but not an abundance. Any insight or direction for its ID is most welcomed.
    Answer
    Dear Von, the images you've sent are crisp and clear, but they are taken too far away for me to see any of the details I need to identify this plant. I would need closeup photographs of the branchlets and winter buds. Sorry I can't offer anything with confidence regarding your plant.
  • Question
    What are the pollinators for Medeola aka Indian Cucumber? Why do they have such interesting shaped styles?
    Answer
    Dear sissona, good morning. You have asked such a good question. I have to report to you that I have never seen insects on the flowers of this species nor have I seen images that display the pollinators. I have done a brief literature survey and not found any reports. I'm sorry that I can't help you with this. If you find anything, please let me know! Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi - I found a shrub by a stream in Concord a month back - apparently flowering in January. Any idea what it is? Tom
    Answer
    Dear TomW, good morning. These are the remnant flowering parts of Hamamelis virginiana (American witch-hazel). This plant flowers in the Autumn season (i.e., not in the winter); however, portions of the flowers persist on the plant for a long time. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was trying to determine what species of Cardamine this might be (C. diphylla?) -- assuming that it is a Toothwort. I actually took this photo while hiking the mountains of western North Carolina near Barnardsville, but I know the range of various spp. in this genus stretch up to New England. I'm sorry that this is the only angle of the plant that I captured. Was a woodland herb, lower elevations, blooming May 2 by the trunk of a tree. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear winterbloomfarm, good morning. Yes, your plant is a species of toothwort (Cardamine), and it could be C. diphylla. While it is a really nice photograph, it doesn't capture the necessary elements I need to confirm the identification. Sorry I can only offer that your hypothesis may be correct. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Arthur, Are you aware of long-stalked holly, Ilex pedunculosa, spreading into the landscape from ornamental plantings? A single tree which I believe is a young long-stalked holly was found in the southern section of Crane Wildlife Management Area, Falmouth, MA. I am aware of a planted specimen at MAS Ashumet Sanctuary which is nearby.
    Answer
    Donald, good morning. I have not yet seen records of Ilex pedunculosa as naturalized in New England. I've checked around a bit and there are no records of this plant naturalized in North America. If you are certain of this species introduction into MA, it would be a new North American record. Keep me posted please!
  • Question
    Hi, I live in Canada and found this plant in a pot outside a friend's shop. I took a cutting for a herbarium project but was unable to ID the plant. It is winter here so no flowers are present, and its leaves have turned red. It was in a pot so not sure how tall it grows or if it's part of a shrub. So far I've gotten these guesses but no one is sure: -Pieris japonica -Ascarina rubricaulis -Photinia x fraseri--Red tip photinia Thanks
    Answer
    maliferous, good morning. I am not certain of who this plant is, though it appears Pieris japonica may be a good hypothesis. While I don't know for certain the identification, it is not Ascarina or Photinia (for whatever help that may be). Good luck with determining the answer.
  • Question
    This fern is growing on a steep shady side of a rocky hill in my yard in Essex County, Byfield, MA. I believe it is Polypodium virginiaum as opposed to Polystichum acrostichoids due to it not having a leaf stem and not having the stocking toed leaf shape. If it is P. virginiaum how is appearance of the fern different than P. appalachiacum (spelling check needed)?
    Answer
    Dear Von, good morning. You have photographed a species of Polypodium, but I cannot tell you which species because there is no image that clearly shows the leaf blade in its entirety (only sections of it). Polypodium appalachianum typically has a slender triangular leaf blade because the lowest leaflets are the longest and the leaftlets tend to be acute at the apex. Polypodium virginiaum has a more oblong leaf blade shape, with the widest point nearer the middle (rather than at the base) and the leaflets are more blunt at the apex. There are other characteristics, but these are the easiest to observe. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thank you for your reply! A friend is fortunate to have a small patch under her old growth trees. I thought I saw a few tiny bits in another part of her yard. In Susan's post about lycopodium could those be the small shiny leaves at the base of the main plant?
    Answer
    Dear rgallica, good morning. The leaves in the picture your reference belong to Mitchella repens (partridgeberry). This member of the Rubiaceae has opposite leaves distributed along a trailing stem and a light-colored midvein only. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you identify this tree with red berries. I am in southern Vermont and saw it today while on a walk. I tried to get a photo of the bark but it came out too blurry to use, so I'm hoping the photo of the berries themselves is sufficient. The second photo shows some of the berries above what I believe is an epiphyte. Can you tell me more about that as well? Thank you so much.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, good afternoon. It looks as though you have photographed a species of Ilex (winterberry). These shrubs have persistent +/- red fruits with sepals that remain on the proximal part of the fruit (where they attach to the pedicel). If you examine the sepals with magnification, you can determine if the margin is ciliate (Ilex verticillata) or if it is without cilia (Ilex laevigata). Best wishees.
  • Question
    Do Pyrola spread by seeds? Can they be successfully transplanted? TY in advance
    Answer
    rgallica, Yes, Pyrola species produce viable seeds, so they do spread via this method. I have not ever attempted transplanting them, but given their perennial nature and the fact they do have underground storage organs, I suspect transplanting may be successful. That written, please be careful and steward your wild populations to prevent loss and keep in mind these species require specific mycorrhizal fungi for growth. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A Woody twining vine or climbing shrub. Young leaves are coated with red hairs, mature leaves are dark green and hairless.
    Answer
    Solowise11, good morning. I don't recognize this plant--but also don't know where to begin because I do not know where this species was photographed. Could you let me know where it was growing in the world? With that information, it might be possible to identify the plant. Thank you.
  • Question
    I often come across Dendrolycopodium plants like the one in the photos below, which have trophophylls near the base of the stem that come off the stem at close to a 90 degree angle, but the stem does not feel prickly at all. Is this just a form of D. hickeyi that I'm seeing? (the trophophylls on different ranks of lateral stems are all the same length). Does the lower stem need to have both widely spreading trophophylls AND feel prickly to be D. dendroideum? Photos taken in Andover, MA. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Susan, Dendrolycopodium dendroideum does not have to feel prickly. It is primarily the orientation of the trophophylls near the stem base that matters, not how rigid they are (which can confer a prickly feel). The orientation of the trophophylls usually means someone feels them more acutely than in the other species, hence the name prickly. Your images looks to be Dendrolycopodium dendroideum. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. Can you tell me if this is a slime mold? if not, what do you think it is? it's growing on the seed pod of a laurel. in Westchester, NY. thanks in advance.
    Answer
    Dear dcmmings, good morning. Unfortunately, I cannot help you with your question. Mycology is outside of my realm of expertise. I suggest you relay your question to a fungal-related group (perhaps one on social media) so that you might find someone to answer your question. Good luck!
  • Question
    What plant is this? Washington state.
    Answer
    Dear redlind, good afternoon. I'm sorry I cannot help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Your question hails from a long way from my region of expertise. You are welcome to ask questions about Washington plants, but there are many that I will not recognize. You would do better seeking an herbarium close to you and sending images there. Good luck.
  • Question
    I found this beautiful leaf "flower" growing on a bush along the sidewalk in April of 2018 on Long Island, NY. It was mostly barren and just beginning to bloom at the tips of its branches, which makes identifying this plant even trickier. I'm an amateur photographer and love to learn about the subjects I shoot, so any help would be very much appreciated!
    Answer
    Dear PastelPetals, good afternoon. You have photographed a woody plant that is emerging from bud. Those are the expanding leaves. But, to identify the plant, I would need more images (e.g., the winter buds, the bark, the habit). If you are able to post more images of different parts of this plant, I may be able to assist. Great photograph.
  • Question
    I went to the market today and find for the upper part of the coconut tree specifically its growing bud wherein the heart of palm can be harvested. I just want to know if it is truly from the coconut trees. These are the pictures that I have taken. The seller said that they are actually from coconut tree but I need to verified it for my research process needs. I am hoping for your response and help. Thank You and God Bless!
    Answer
    Dear navea_henson, good morning. I'm sorry I cannot help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. Unfortunately, the plants you are asking about originate a long way from my region of expertise. Sorry, again, I cannot assist you with your question. I hope everything works out, I have enjoyed the heart of palm from tropical forests in Peru and it was spectacular.
  • Question
    Please help me identify this plant. Found in Cameroon in the grass land and grows upland. Is a creeping plant. Hope this information help. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Solowise11, I'm sorry I can't help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. Your question details plants that are a long way from my region of expertise. That all written, the leaf outline and presence of stipules suggests this may be a member of the Urticaceae (stinging nettle family). Hopefully that might help you initiate your study of these plants.
  • Question
    Can you help with the ID of this plant? Originally I thought it was one of the glassworts, but now I'm leaning toward Sesuvium. though GoBotany doesn't show the one species listed to be in this area (Deer Island, Amesbury) The flowers seem to match, though in this case they seem to be forming on the tip of the stem, rather than the side.
    Answer
    Chaffeemonell, you have photographed Spergularia marina (saltmarsh sand-spurry). This is a frequent species in saline marshes and along beach strands in much of New England. If you examine it closely in the field, you can see the stipules that would distinguish this from vegetative Sesuvium maritimum. Best wishes.