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PlantShare

Sightings Locator

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How to Use

Enter a plant name and we'll show where it's been seen recently.

Don't see a plant you think should be there?

You will see all recent sightings that others have marked for public view or for a PlantShare group that you belong to. Rare and endangered plants will not be displayed.

Ask the Botanist

Ace Acer

Our ace botanists are here to help you identify wild New England plants and to answer questions about their ecology and conservation. When posting a question, please provide the location, habitat (e.g. river, mountain, woodland), and photographs of the plant.

Everyone can read the answers, but only logged-in users can ask questions. Log in to ask a question.

Recently Answered Questions

  • Question
    This flower was found on the edge of a forest path within 15-20 feet of the Stillwater River. The trees are mostly conifers with some red maple and white birch. The plant has opposite leaves that are toothed and simple. They are mostly heart-shaped, except that the base of the leaf is flat, not curved. The flowers are in umbels coming from leaf axils with each flower having 5 petals. The color is white. It was leaning over into the trail, but would estimate that it was about 2 to 2.5 feet tall.
    Answer
    Dear GMartha, Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not uploading. Feel free to send images directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist. (Tuesday, 15 September 2020)
  • Question
    I have an invasive plant in my yard; it looks like a tree but spreads via underground runners. It has small white flowers in spring over bright green leaves. It is 12-15' tall with elongated leaves along thin branches. Bark is smooth and slightly striated; trunk only gets about 1" thick. The runners are quite thick and run very deep - deeper than locust runners. These cannot easily be pulled by hand.
    Answer
    Dear kblossfeld, Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not uploading. Feel free to send images directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist. (Tuesday, 15 September 2020)
  • Question
    I found this plant in our creek bed in southern Indiana. I have never seen another like it on our 150 acres. It developed an elongated cluster of green berries below the leaves. It was about 18 inches high. No flowers ever. It is now wilted (September) and the berry cluster is turning red. Please help identify. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Betsy, Go Botany is experiencing a technical issue and images are not uploading. Feel free to send images directly to me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist. (Tuesday, 15 September 2020)

More Recently Answered Questions »