Your help is appreciated.    We depend on donations to help keep this site free and up to date for you. Can you please help us?

Questions and Answers

2015

  • Question
    Hey can you help me identify this plant? It doesn't look like a fern because it actually has a long woody stem. Not sure about the habitat but it seems to be wind pollinated since after all this time it hasn't bore any flowers. The light green leaves are the new leaves. Another thing worth mentioning is that when I first saw it there were like light green cases (kind of like cut peas) surrounding the shoot of the plant. I've attached a drawing that perhaps would help. It grows very quickly also.
    Answer
    Dear middlethought3469, I can't tell you exactly which species of plant you have pictured. It is a plant in the Fabaceae (legume family) with bipinnately compound leaves. To identify it further than this, flowers or fruits would be necessary and the general region this plant is found in would be necessary.
  • Question
    Hello! Any help with this forest floor plant would be much appreciated! (I found a more developed plant of the same species with small developing thorns) -southern ct
    Answer
    Dear Noah, assuming the plant with armature you found is the same species, this plant is Smilax glauca (glaucous-leaved greenbriar). It is a liana that will climb over other species at maturity. It will also have stout prickles once larger. It is a native woody plant in the Smilacaceae. Best wishes.
  • Question
    i am submitting a couple more photos of the plant
    Answer
    Dear girija, Your plant is likely a species of Dracaena (dragon plant), most of which are native to Africa. While classifications vary, this group is often placed in its own family (Dracaenaceae).
  • Question
    Why do red-osier dogwoods have red bark and does the red pigment serve any function?
    Answer
    Dear Khalling, while I can't answer your question specifically, plant pigments (in general) do have many functions. They serve as attractants, as protection against the sun, and some even offer frost tolerance. Why Swida sericea (in particular) has red bark is unknown to me. Best wishes.
  • Question
    If possible, would you please identify this hardy flowering plant? It has flowered since this summer into December now. It grows in patio boxes in downtown Boston, just off the Charles River.
    Answer
    Dear Jules, I'm sorry I cannot help you with this question. Some cultivated species are difficult to identify, especially because their origin (i.e., where they were first cultivated) is unknown, and this information is very helpful in determining the identity of the plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm from RI, USA. I recieved this plant from my daughter for Mother's Day of last year. It was in a Dixie cup. I repotted it with some morning glories and now it has taken off! No flowers have ever bloomed from it, and my daughter was told it was snapdragon. I don't believe it is, I have tried to identify it, but have had NO luck! Can you please help!
    Answer
    Dear Manderoo22, I'm sorry, I can't assist you with this question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we do try to entertain all plant-related questions, some cultivated species are difficult to identify because their location of origin is unknown. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi looking to see what a couple plants which I thin is Eastern Skunk Cabbage, ferns and moss. One area was like a hard black moss like area or maybe tree roots? It's a small forested wetland. One area I found something growing very small curled buds and was wondering if it was skunk cabbage too. It's so warm that I believe it's confused! :) Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear maddymcdonald5, I will try to provide some idea of what you are seeing (though I don't know the area these images were taken from). The first is a bryophyte with a sedge (genus Carex) growing out of it. The second is a fern, likely in the genus Dryopteris (perhaps Dryopteris intermedia, evergreen wood fern), the third does look like it may be the bud of Symplocarpus foetidus (skunk-cabbage). You could smell the bud to confirm this (it will have a foul odor, especially if bruised slightly). The fourth and fifth images are not clear enough for me to offer any help (I'm sorry).
  • Question
    I found this plant in a woodland park located in the Bronx. Can you help me identify it?
    Answer
    Dear BxForager, I would not be able to confidently identify this plant without reproductive structures; however, it looks very much like Arum italicum (Italian lords-and-ladies) or a related species. These plants are members of the Arum Family (Araceae) and are not native to North America. Best wishes. p.s., if this is a wild plant population, it may represent one of the first occurrences of this species in NY. Feel free to connect with me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org to discuss if you would like.
  • Question
    Hi, I found this plant a couple of years ago while hiking a trail in 'French Town Road Park' in RI. I looked it up on the internet and the closest I could find is Woodland Pinedrops (Pterospora andromedea Nutt.) but those look like 'hairy pine sap". When I looked it up on this site the photos don't look like the one I have found. I wanted to share it on this site but I don't want to list it wrong. Maybe you could help. Art Sirois
    Answer
    Dear Art, you have found Conopholis americana (American squaw-root), a parasitic plant found in the Orobanchaceae. It is a native rare plant in RI. To my knowledge, there are about 8 extant populations known in RI and this discovery of yours needs to be cross-referenced with known populations to see if it is a previously unknown population. Great find and thank you for posting it here. If you are able to contact me at "ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org", I can help you learn if this represents a new population. Best wishes.
  • Question
    hello once again...can you please confirm if this fern is spinulose wood fern (dryopteris carthusiana) I have pictures of it here and I was able to get a good shot of the basal pina which as you can see has the first two downward pinules larger than the other pinules and according to my book is diagnostic,,though the book only says the first pinule and in this fern I have here its the first two very lacy fern, I have a shot of the sori as well.. it was in Dover, Mass today... thanks a lot...
    Answer
    Dear craymond, this image is Dryopteris intermedia (evergreen wood fern). The first leafules on the lower side of the lowest leaflets do show some variation. In the image you have here, one of these leafules isn't textbook, but that on the other side is (and I can see other leaves in your images and they show the characteristic pattern of Dryopteris intermedia). Also, note that this fern is quite green (Dryopteris carthusiana has deciduous leaves that would be brown and senescing at this point). If you have magnification, you can also look for stipitate glands along the rachis and costa (midrib of leaf and leaflets, respectively), present in D. intermedia and absent in D. carthusiana. Feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org if anything I've shared here is unclear.
  • Question
    Hello, could you please help me identify this plant? I got it from my friend who bought it in Botanic Garden in Berlin but unfortunately he doesn't know anything about it.
    Answer
    Dear karmapema, the structure you are holding is an infructescence (an array of fruits) from a plant in the genus Banksia. The genus name is also used as the common name for this group. Banksias belong to the Proteaceae and are found in Australia (but are now cultivated in other parts of the world). Best wishes.
  • Question
    hi can you please see if you can identify this fern. picture taken today 12/07/15 in Sherborn, MA... at a Trustees of Reservations site...my first impression is that this is fragile fern also called brittle fern, cystopteris fragilis, I found this fern on a rock outcropping, in a clump with both live and dead fronds, I did not key it out but from the picture is my field guide I think it is this fern...thanks a lot... craymond
    Answer
    Dear craymond, your fern does indeed look like a species of Cystopteris, specifically Cystoperis fragilis (fragile fern). This is the common species of the genus that is found on rocks, cliffs, and other outcrops where soil is thin to nearly non-existent. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you tell me what this white flower is looks like it belongs to large bush/ tree? It's found in/near a wooded wetlands.
    Answer
    Dear maddymcdonald5, this is the fruit of Echinocystis lobata (wild cucumber), a member of the Cucurbitaceae (cucumber family). The fruit is a prickly capsule that opens at the apex by large pores to let the seeds disperse. It is a native vine of North America.
  • Question
    Can you identify this plant for me? Are there benefits to having this plant? Is it poisonous?
    Answer
    Dear Shellandria25, while I am not an expert on cultivated plants (Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England), your potted plant looks much like a species of Kalanchoe, a group of succulent plants in the Crassulaceae (stonecrop family) that are native to tropical regions of the Old World. These species are used for ornament around the world. While there have been examples of livestock poisoning when these plants have been fed on extensively, I'm not aware of human poisonings. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this plant growing on a fence near a park in the Bronx. Can you help me to identify it?
    Answer
    Dear BxForager, the liana you have photographed is Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle). This woody plant with opposite entire leaves has black berries for a fruit. As its name suggests, this species is native to Asia. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found this shrub in Oxford CT in a wooded wetland. Shrub about 3 ft tall. Fruit is somewhat fleshy with hard seed. Leaves more pubescent on upperside than underside.. Each cluster of fruit was located at tip of stem. Can't identify it..please help!
    Answer
    Dear Lisa, you have collected Rhodotypos scandens (black jetbead), a non-native member of the Rosaceae. The opposite leaves with toothed margins and black fruits at the apex of the stem are reliable characters for identification.
  • Question
    Hi I am looking to find out what kind of ferns these may be. It's located in/near wetlands. Reading, MA woodland area.
    Answer
    Dear maddymacdonald5, the picture is a little close for me to see the form of the fern, but it appears to be a member of the Osmundaceae (royal fern family). It could be either Osmundastrum cinnamomeum (cinnamon fern) or Osmunda claytoniana (interrupted fern), but I would need additional images to help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    hello...I am new here... and want to just say this is a nice website..thanks.. I just took this picture of this clubmoss.. in Dover, Mass.. as there are a lot of these club mosses I wasn't sure what this one was.... I think it is princess pine (dendrolycopodium obscurum) based on the book I am looking at. it was common where I saw it...can you confirm this ? thanks a lot! craymond
    Answer
    Dear craymond, yes, I do believe you are correct with Dendrolycopodium obscurum. You can see the trophophylls (vegetative leaves) of the main axis are oriented upright (i.e., they are not spreading) and the branches are certainly flattened to a degree. This is our common species of tree-clubmoss in New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have a general question... maybe you can help... If I want to see a particular plant in this state ...say for example daisy leaf moonwort (botrychium matricariifolium) , a small fern ... how would I go about finding it...not now, but say in the spring or summer.. I know it occurs in eastern Mass but I haven't seen it before..thanks in advance.. craymond
    Answer
    Dear craymond, finding species of interest is kind of like performing detective work. Knowing its identififcation, ecology, and phenology (who, what, and when) are the major obstacles to finding it on the landscape. Of course, asking someone who knows where this species can be found is one easy way to find it. One can also research other sources, such as journal articles, herbarium specimens, and such things to identify locations (and timing) to find plants. These sources are used all the time to locate species of interest (such as rare plants). I hope this helps.
  • Question
    Found this leaf but have no clue what kind of tree it came from. Thank you for your last response. It was very helpful.
    Answer
    Dear TaylorPlant, I cannot tell you for certain what species this leaf is from. I will note that it looks like a species of Ulmus (elm) for several reasons and perhaps you can find additional support for this hypothesis. If you can post additional images of the plant, I may be able to come to a more confident identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is the name of this plant sample, it was located in Pelham Bay Park.
    Answer
    Dear BxForager, I can't help you with this one--I simply can't see enough of the plant in the photograph to identify it. If you are able to get an image of the plant from its natural habitat (i.e., in place so I can see the arrangement and form of its structures), I may be able to help more.
  • Question
    What is the name of this shrub found near Pelham Bay Park
    Answer
    Dear BxForager, you appear to posted a photograph of a species of Ligustrum (privet), a non-native member of the Oleaceae (olive family). I cannot tell you which species of Ligustrum you have without closer images showing the type of hairs found on the branchlets. Hopefully, knowing the genus will be of use to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have a couple of pictures of a lemon like fruit, which many hanging facets, of skin through and through. May be used to get Lemon Oil. Nobody where I am has ever seen this before. Nor have I. I'd like to send the two pictures, and see if it can be identified. Can you identify what this is from the picture below ?
    Answer
    Dear dermage1, from the image alone, I am unable to help. There is much information that would be useful to me that perhaps you can supply. Is the plant herbaceous or woody? Is it cultivated or wild? Most importantly, what part of the world is this plant from? Feel free to send this information to my email at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org.
  • Question
    Hello i would like to identify these plants i took photos of in Ontario near the escarpment. The last one is a maple tree i know but not sure what type
    Answer
    TaylorPlant, the first image with the pink flowers is Securigera varia (purple crown-vetch). The second plant is a species of Symphyotrichum (American-aster), but I would need additional images of the remaining portions of the plant to tell you which species. The third image appears to be Phragmites australis (common reed). The fourth image is a species of goldenrod with triple-nerved leaves, such as Solidago canadensis (Canada goldenrod). The last image looks most like Acer platanoides (Norway maple). Hopefully these determinations are helpful for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    No plant ID necessary, but a question. We have an established stand of skunk cabbage in our woods (this is near Binghamton, NY) and last week I was stunned to see the blooms emerging. I'm assuming this is unusual--at least I've never seen it happen before, and I'm concerned about what this might mean for spring growth and survival.
    Answer
    Dear fishc, this happens from time to time (a second flowering late in the season) with many different species of plants (though I most frequently see this with woody species, it does happen with herbaceous plants as well). This happens most often with unusually warm autumns, the plants are responding as if it were spring. Generally, they survive this (in my experience), but it certainly would affect energy storage. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, could you help me out with this shrub? I found it on a beach in Brooklyn, New York.
    Answer
    Dear Gardenbed, you have photographed Morella caroliniensis (small bayberry), the famous plant of bayberry candles. The fruits are wax-encrusted achenes that will generate a noticeable fragrance, as do the leaves and bark. This is a native member of the Myricaceae (bayberry family).
  • Question
    Hi I wouldl like to identify these plants that i photographed in Ontario and made a line transect of? a)pic #1 this wrinkled looking leafy green plant what is it? and there are two baby plants beside it ..what are they? b) pic#2..I would like to know what this plant is ? c) pic#3..I would like to know what this plant is as well..thankyou for your help :)
    Answer
    Dear Michael, good morning. The plants in the first image I cannot help with--I would need a larger photograph with better resolution. Both pictures 2 and 3 are young plants of Quercus rubra (northern red oak). The 3rd plant is simply displaying more red pigment in the leaves than the 2nd plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am not able to upload any image. Please solve the problem Location: India, Tamilnadu state, Tiruchchirappalli city This plant is seen in my garden. What is this plant called? Please give details, such as botanical name, family.
    Answer
    Dear seyonyazhvaendhan, I'm sorry you are having difficulty uploading images. Without an image, I have little chance of assisting you given the thousands of species that are found in India. Also, this country is far from any region of expertise, so there may not be any help I will be able to offer-even with an image. However, if you would like to send an image by email (ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org), I would be willing to try and assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    this was out on the cape in MA near eastham, it was set aways back from the shore line but was very prominent and covered most of the ground when found
    Answer
    Dear NRC212Ferreira, this plant is a native shrub called Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (red bearberry). It is a member of the Ericaceae (heath family). Locally common on bluffs and sandy areas.
  • Question
    Hello again this was found very close to the last specimen i asked about. Along wooded area near a beach in the cape in eastham MA.
    Answer
    Dear NRC212Ferreira, this appears to be a seedling of Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust). The pinnately compound leaves with a pair of stipular spines at the base and entire leaflets are good diagnostic characters. It is native to North America but introduced in New England.
  • Question
    Hello I recently picked this off a Bush in Buckinghamshire could you please let me know the name of the bush it come from. Many thanks.
    Answer
    Dear angelrainbow123, good morning. You have collected an acorn from an oak in the "white oak group" (Quercus section Quercus). I cannot tell you any more detail than that because of your location (I'm in the northeastern United States and am not super familiar with the plants of the UK). I hope this helps some and wish you the best.
  • Question
    I saw the photos from Pcosta123 on 27 October 2015. They sure look and sounds like Toxicodendron vernix.
    Answer
    Dear Doug, they may be that species, but the resolution of the photographs did not allow me to have confidence making any determination. There was a mention of fruits--but I could not see these in any photograph (and the description of the fruits was not what I would expect for Toxicodendron vernix--though again it may be that species). Thanks for offering the suggestion. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Arthur, I received this photo with a request to identify the plant in the middle of the photo. I don't know if it's woody, but the leaf looks like Rumex crispus. Can you help? Thanks. l
    Answer
    Dear Donald, I can't help you with this one. I don't recognize it as anything that grows in New England or anything that expresses this morphology. If you are able to get a picture of the underside of the leaves, it would be helpful (I have some ideas, but nothing confident).
  • Question
    I wonder if you can help ID this plant. It looks like a Pyrola, but it's not Pyrola americana (the leaves are distinctly different) and the leaf stalks seem too long to be P. elliptica. There are a few individual plants growing in an area in Dedham and I've been waiting for it to flower for about 5 years now to help with ID, but that hasn't happened (so I can't send you a flower photo). Could the pinkish coloring of the leaf stalk be characteristic for species ID?
    Answer
    Dear stephradner, your plant certainly appears to be a species of Pyrola. Leaf blade to petiole dimensions are sometimes skewed from normal in shaded plants. I can't see the outline of the leaf blades well in your image, but these plants may well be Pyrola elliptica (growing in shade). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Do you know what this shrub/ small tree is? Found growing on a roadside in coastal Maine.
    Answer
    Dear KyleJones, I do not recognize the plant you have posted images of. It appears to belong the Malus clade (including such genera as Cotoneaster, Chaenomeles, Photinia, Aronia, etc.). You note it is growing roadside, but perhaps you can comment on whether or not it is growing in a cultivated or naturalized setting. If this is a wild plant that has escaped cultivation, it appears to be something new to the New England flora. I would like to discuss further if you have time (you can email me at ahaines@newenglandwild.org). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Attempted to get closer pictures of these plants.. There's dried berries hanging under the leaves .. Found in hauppauge Long Island
    Answer
    Dear Pcosta123, I'm sorry, I'm not going to be able to help you from the images. The resolution is just not clear enough (even though you have captured a number of images that show the plant from many nice angles). While you may not want to go through this trouble, the only thing I can offer is to examine a specimen of the plant for you. If you wish to mail me some material from this plant, I can give you details if you email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Saw these yellow trees off a trail in ronkonkoma there were some fruits or berries hanging below.. I was curious what these exquisite ferns were so I sampled some berries! What species of fern are these?
    Answer
    Dear Pcosta123, I'm sorry I can't answer your question (exactly). The plant with the yellow leaves is not a fern, but a deciduous shrub that will flower and fruit (not produce spores like a fern). The images are, unfortunately, not clear enough or with enough resolution for me to see what species you have photographed. If you are able to get higher resolution images I can try to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Juncus ambiguus based on truncate capsules and short inner tepals? From an island off the coast of Washington County, Maine. The plant is very small, with much shorter culms than images on the Go Botany species page. Many flowers are replaced by bulbils or propagules. Is that characteristic of this species?
    Answer
    Thokozile, Juncus ranarius (the correct name for what we were calling Juncus ambiguous) is defined (in part) on truncate capsules with short, obtuse to rounded inner tepals. It is also defined on a compact inflorescence with flowers often grouped into glommerules (rather than being positioned singly). There is a lot of intermediate material between Juncus ranarius and Juncus bufonius. The bulbils you note are simply sterile flowers or flowers that have not yet matured (I see that a lot in this species). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thanks for posting my sighting of Chenopodium berlandieri and my close-up photo of the fruit. Here is another photo of a part of the inflorescence of the same individual. (Harrington, Maine) Is this species ever used for food? I read (Harper's May 2014) the species is thought to be the closest wild relative of Chenopodium quinoa grown for food in the Andes. One theory is that migrating birds long ago spread ancestors of C. berlandieri from North America into Central and South America.
    Answer
    Thokozile, Chenopodium berlandieri has been used for food by the eastern indigenous. In fact, it is one of the four first cultivated plants in eastern North America (sunflower, marsh-elder, pitseed goosefoot, and container gourd). Given your location, I'm assuming you are finding Chenopodium berlandieri var. macrocalycium (which is fairly rare in Maine, I've seen it very few times). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found this late-flowering parsley family herb at moist margin of St. Moritz Ponds, Quincy on Aug. 16. With trifoilate leaves, flattened rays, bracteate umbellets, and bifid white petals.
    Answer
    Dear ophis, you have photographed what appears to be a species of Oenanthe (water-dropwort), a member of the celery family. No member of this genus has ever been collected wild in New England (to my knowledge). While I can't tell you which species you have for certain, it is close to Oenanthe javanica (Java water-dropwort). The only way I can identify this for certain is to receive a specimen or more images that show additional plants and close-ups of the fruits. If you are willing to contact me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, we can strategize a way to make sure your discovery becomes part of the museum record here in New England.
  • Question
    This plant is growing next to a cemetery headstone in CT. I have looked in Weeds of the NOrtheast and in the Go Botany site to identify it but I cannot find a reasonable match. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear dellabitta, Yes, I can help (at least a little). The plant you have photographed is in the genus Oenothera (evening-primrose). I can't tell you which species without additional close-up images, but it is either Oenothera biennis (common evening-primrose) are a species related to it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found,this plant along recently mown X-c ski train in Norwich, Vt. Pulled out 1 tiny one,of many and put in pot to ID. It has grown a lot since then. Now reminds me of cilantro/parsley,and stem magnified looks like,little cerely. I think it is 2x compound, has tiny tiny sparce hairs on leaf margins and veins. Pretty sure it's in Apiaceae, HOPED a native cicely, but wonder if it could be Chervil. The leaflets are a bit smaller than cilantro for size reference. Thanks! (Norwich is near Ct. Rive
    Answer
    Dear Lpiel, I can't tell you for certain what you are growing in the pot. I think that Osmorhiza (sweet-cicely) is a good hypothesis. While the leaf segment apices are blunter than usual, that is sometimes seen in seedling plants. My only hesitation is the distribution and kinds of hairs I can see are unlike what I typically seen in this genus. It is not chervil. I think you may have to grow it longer for us to be sure of what it is. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could this be Persicaria setacea? The leaves have blotches like P. maculosa, but the flowers are white-ish. I didn't get a good picture of the stipule, but I took a small sample home and it seems more bristly/hairy than fringed. Does P. setacea have blotches on the leaves? This is growing on the edge of a pond in Dedham Town Forest where it would normally be very close to submerged in non-drought times, about 200 feet from I-95 South.
    Answer
    Dear stephradner, while I can't identify your smartweed with confidence (without additional close-up images of the flowers and stipules), it is likely Persicaria maculosa (lady's-thumb smartweed). While the inflorescence is rather small for this species, such a display is not uncommon in habitats that are less than ideal for this species. There are only a few species that routinely show the blotches on the leaves, but P. setacea is not one of them. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! I took this pic of "wild dandelions" in september in botanical garden. Maybe you help me to identificate this species of asteraceae? thank you in advance!
    Answer
    Dear Anastasia, you appear to have photographed a species of Lactuca (lettuce). There are several wild species that are found in North American and Europe. I cannot tell you which species you have captured without images of the leaves and/or close-ups of the fruit. Hopefully knowing the genus will be useful.
  • Question
    Hi, i'm from Maryland and was always curious what this weed/plant was and had no idea the pod turned into flowers... any idea? a simple google image search returned no results
    Answer
    Dear Panic.exe, your plant is Hibiscus trionum (Venice rose-mallow), a non-native plant that is found occasionally in North America. This species belongs to the Malvaceae (mallow family), which includes species like okra, cotton, and hollyhock.
  • Question
    I have a few big oak trees, I think Northern Red. They are producing two kinds of acorns, large and small, present in roughly equal numbers, that I need your help identifying. From what I understand, trees in the red oak family take two years to produce acorns. Do they typically drop one-year-old acorns as well, and am I seeing those “half-baked” acorns? On the other hand, the smaller ones also look like pictures of Black Oak acorns, so is it possible that I have a mix of Red and Black Oaks?
    Answer
    Dear yigalagam, the trees really only produce one kind of acorn. What you are seeing are abortive acorns that were damaged (for some reason) prior to maturation. The tree drops these acorns early, which are usually smaller than the fully mature ones (but may occur in a number of different sizes). If you examine those you have pictured carefully, you will notice the smaller ones that are firmly attached to the involucre (what is commonly called "the cap", but is actually the base of the acorn) are generally empty. While trees in the black oak group (which includes northern red oak) do take two growing seasons to produce fully mature acorns, those that were pollinated this previous spring are still very tiny (much smaller than those you have photographed). I hope this information is helpful.
  • Question
    Regarding the blackberry in concord,here's a picture of the spent fruit. If this doesn't work, I will try again in the spring. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, thank you for the additional image. It does not look like any of the blackberries that belong to the complex of species that includes the Himalayan blackberry. The image you supplied is a raceme (a central axis from which flower stalks arise), while those species have a panicle (an array of flowers/fruits with branching). While I can't tell you the species without examining the plant, it does appear to be a native species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can not seem to be able to upload photo please advise
    Answer
    Dear triffid, anytime in the future you have difficulty uploading an image, free to attach it to an email and send it to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will do my best to help with the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is a blackberry. I'm trying to figure out if it's native or the invasive Himalayan blackberry. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, to identify this as one of the introduced blackberries with confidence, I would need to see an image of the inflorescence (even a remnant one), as the array of flowers (or fruits) has a different branching pattern than our native species. The introduced blackberries you refer to also have very stout and somewhat flattened prickles. Our native species vary, and those that do have stout prickles are usually circular in cross-section (at least above the base). I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Following up on your rely to my question. The hay was purchased in rensselaer co , in NY state. Unfortunately I do not have the plant just those seeds and others like that were through out the hay. Do you know who I could contact that might be able to identify it from the pods? PEACE123
    Answer
    Dear Peace123, You could try contacting someone at the New York Botanical Garden, the New York State Museum, or Cornell and see if they would receive a shipment of the legumes for identification. If you want them identified, it will be necessary to send them to someone so they can inspect them closely. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was given a money plant when I got hired at my job last year. It stays indoors in a large window of my office. The money plant started withering away and a small plant started growing beside it. Would you be able to tell what kind of plant this is? It started growing about a month ago.
    Answer
    Dear Ericbeee, the plant growing beside your cultivated species is Erigeron canadensis (Canada fleabane). It is a native, early successional plant of North America that is commonly found along roadsides, in disturbed soils, and about agricultural areas. It is not poisonous. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you identify what plant these pods come from? They were found in our sons horses hay. They rattle when shaken. Do they come from the Rattlebox plant?
    Answer
    Dear Peace123, what you have photographed are the legumes (i.e., fruit) of some plant in the Fabaceae (legume family). Without the rest of the plant and the part of the world the plant was found in, it will be very difficult for me to tell you which species you have. I'm sorry I can't be more precise.
  • Question
    Hi! I was wondering if I could get some help identifying this bush that grows in my area (Connecticut shoreline). It grows almost exclusively along river beds, areas prone to flooding and in local wooded marshes. Best guess so far would be something in the Ericaceae family (possibly Vaccinium- though I cannot find any berries, or Rhododendron - though I have never been aware of this plant during its flowering season. Any help would be much appreciated, right now it has got me stumped!
    Answer
    Dear numerousnoahs, I do think you are correct that this species is a member of the Ericaceae. I can't see necessary details well enough to give you a confident answer. The green branches and what details I can see of the winter buds suggests Vaccinium corymbosum (highbush blueberry). You could confirm this by looking for whitish papillae (small, rounded bumps) on the young branchlets (most species of blueberry, but not all, have these and it is a good way to narrow down to the genus). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi: Not sure if this is Meadow or Andrews Bottle Gentian. How can I tell the difference? I am on the Groton Conservation Commission. Found near Nashua River. Mary Metzger
    Answer
    Dear Mary, this is a very difficult question to answer without images, because it requires you to sort our the corolla (all of the petals of a given flower taken collectively). There is an image of these two species in the Newcombs's Wildflower Guide (page 253) that shows the differences in the corollas. If you don't have access to this, let me know and I can find a way to get an illustration to you (email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. The technical description of the differences are found on the Go Botany website (use the dichotomous key and go to the Gentiana key). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please help mename this wild plant.thanks
    Answer
    Dear Norlebajado, I would enjoy assisting you with your question, but there is some necessary information I would need in order to help. I don't know where the plant is from that you have pictured, and without this information, it is very difficult to identify plants. There are nearly 500,000 species of plants in the world. Knowing the region helps immensely to narrow down the choices. Please keep in mind that Go Botany is web site dedicated to wild plants of New England. If you are from outside this region, I can help you find an organization that may be able to help.
  • Question
    Good afternoon! Could you please take a look at this plant? Woody sapling, stem armored with spines. (I apologize for the poor phone pictures). Leaves are 5 lobed and toothed. Coastal area of Everett, MA above the high tide line. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear KDC, your plant is Kalopanax septemlobus (castor-aralia), a non-native member of the Apiaceae (celery family) related to the genus Aralia (sarsaparilla). The alternate, palmately lobed leaves and stems with stout armature are good identifying marks for this species.
  • Question
    I'm a volunteer docent at Quincy Bog Natural Area in Rumney NH. I came across this plant today in a dry area at the edge of the Bog's parking lot. Can you identify what it is or point me in the right direction?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, your plant is a species of Persicaria (smartweed), in the Polygonaceae (knotweed family). I can't see the details that I need in order to tell you exactly which species it is. I would need to see details of the flowers and the tubular stipules in order to identify it for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    hi .. We live in Austin, TX. We have a small plant, almost 3 years old. We don't know what plant it is, and is it really going to be a be a tree. Don't want to unnecessarily remove it if it is going to be a slow growing, but eventually be a tree (which I am hoping it is). Am uploading some images below. Can you please help? Thank you in advance.
    Answer
    Dear d1d12@hotmail.com, TX is far out of my range of expertise. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. The plant certainly reminds me of a species of Rhamnus (buckthorn), but the way the fruits are distributed on the plant is unlike that genus. You might want to contact the folks at BRIT (Botanical Research Institute of Texas) who could provide a confident identification for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    General plant question: plants do cellular respiration to live and grow. Terrestrial plants can "drown," but aquatic plants are always surrounded by water. How? Why? Thanks!
    Answer
    Bryanlindsey, in a nut shell, it is adaptations to each environment that allow plants to thrive where they grow. Aquatic plant adaptations allow them to live in inundated conditions, whereas terrestrial plants have features that allow them to live on land, sometimes even with extreme water absence. While this format does not allow for a long response, perform a web search on "aquatic plant adaptations" and you will find how these species are ecologically capable of living in this situation.
  • Question
    I THINK I know what this tree seedling is, but I'm not certain. I was wondering if an expert could identify it for me and help me find out if I'm right or wrong. Sooo... what is this? Located in central Ohio, small wooded area near subdivision.
    Answer
    Dear Westy81585, while I can't tell you for certain what species you have without a specimen (because minute details of the kinds of hairs present on the leaf are important) you appear to have an oak in the "chestnut oak" group. This group of species have relatively short, tooth-like lobes along the margin. It looks much like Quercus prinoides (dwarf chestnut oak), but that species is quite rare in Ohio. Other species in this group include Quercus muehlenbergii (yellow chestnut oak) and Quercus montana (mountain chestnut oak). Hopefully narrowing it down this much will be the assistance you need. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you tell me what kind of plant in the photo. I thought it had pretty leaves but now it is growing everywhere. Its root are big and tuberous and it didnt flower so I am beginning to dig it up. Woodland area, NH near lake.
    Answer
    Dear Kathleen, the plant in your photograph is a species of Lupinus (lupine), most likely Lupinus polyphyllos (blue lupine). This is a non-native species that can be aggressive in cleared habitats where it is free to spread (e.g., fields, roadsides, banks).
  • Question
    This plant is common in the back dune depressions along with Hudsonia on Plum Island. The lacy leaves stay green deep into the cold season and have the appearance of lichen or seaweed. The flowers appear on a woody stalk during the summer and are not showy.
    Answer
    Dear chaffee, this plant is a member of the Asteraceae called Artemisia campestris ssp. caudata (field wormword). It is a native biennial that occurs in sand (and sometimes gravel) along the coastal plain, especially dunes and back beaches, etc.
  • Question
    Hi, I’m in Danielson, Connecticut. This plant has been growing in the corner of my garden for a year and a half now, and I’ve only just now decided to try to figure out what it is. Embarrassingly enough, I can’t tell whether it’s a velvetleaf, a young catalpa, or something else entirely. (Very little experience with plants.) Could you identify it for me? Thank you very much, Erick
    Answer
    Dear ejpiller, your plant is a species of Catalpa. I am unable to tell you with confidence which one without flowers or fruits. The leaves look most like Catalpa speciosa (northern catalpa). Catalpa has whorled leaves (in this case, three leaves emerging from each node on the stem), whereas velvetleaf has alternate leaves (only one leaf at each node on the stem). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thank you for your help on the crabapple. I also came across another plant in a meadow with goldenrod and milkweed in Cuyahoga Valley, Ohio. I could not identify it. I attached several pictures. Hope you can help. Thanks again.
    Answer
    Dear rayrites, your plant appears to be Hibiscus moscheutos (swamp rose-mallow), a native member of the mallow family. It is usually associated with wetland edges and low fields (and similar habitats with wet or seasonally saturated soils). Best wishes.
  • Question
    woodlands plant - roadside - Windham, NH.
    Answer
    Dear tracyd123, these are the pinnately compound leaves of Rhus typhina (staghorn sumac). They turn a brilliant orange-red in the autumn.
  • Question
    woodlands plant - windham, NH.
    Answer
    Dear tracyd123, this shrub/small tree is Rhus typhina (staghorn sumac). It is a common, successional species found along roadsides and field edges.
  • Question
    I saw this tree while hiking in Cuyahoga Valley in Ohio. It bears dark red and green fruits. Tried online identification but could not arrive at a specific species. I hope you can help me. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear rayrites, the woody plant you have photographed is a species of Malus (apple). While I cannot be certain from just a photograph, it may be Malus prunifolia (pear-leaved crab apple). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found these 3 different types of berry trees on my property in Maine. They all look like elderberries but the leaves are different on each one so I know they can't be. Can you identify?
    Answer
    Dear Clueless, the plant with blue fruits (tire visible in the background) is Viburnum nudum (wild raisin). The plant with blue fruits and bright red pedicels (i.e., fruit stalks) is Swida racemosa (gray dogwood). The final plant with very dark fruits is Prunus serotina (black cherry). These all have simple (i.e., undivided) leaves. Those of Sambucus (elderberry) are pinnately divided. Thanks for the nice images.
  • Question
    Trying to differentiate Persicaria hydropiperoides and setacea on Martha's Vineyard. Flora Novae Angliae uses differences in enlargement of ocreal hairs at base to distinguish. Photos of ocreae by Andrew Nelson and Arieh Tal on GoBotany show no enlargement that I can see. What am I misinterpreting? What other clues can I use?
    Answer
    Dear gregorypalermo, the images on Go Botany do show the features, but they are not enlarged enough for you to discern what is going on without knowing what to look for. To identify these species, you need magnification so you can measure carefully the hairs on the stipule surface and determine the length that is fused to the surface divided by the total length of the hair. In brief, Persicaria setacea has hairs on the stipule surface that are fused only a short distance at the base (vs. P. hydropiperoides, with hairs fused to the stipule much more of their total length), in effect making the stipule of P. setacea look more bristly. The hairs I am discussing are not those at the top margin of the stipule, but those on the surface of the tubular stipule. Feel free to continue this discussion at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org if I can help you further.
  • Question
    I have a summer home in NH in the woods on a lake. My former neighbor gave me the first plant before she left but didnt tell me what it is or where to plant it. She did say it was pervasiveso Id like to pick the right lovation. The 2nd is growing wild, new this year. Tree like with tiny orange flowers on it. Its pretty so Id like to find a good location but not sure how big it will get. I have actually cut thus back 3x this summer. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Kathleen, I cannot help you with the cultivated plant (sorry), but the wild species with yellow flowers is Bidens frondosa (Devil's beggar-ticks). It is a native species of beggar-ticks that is typically found on shorelines and wetlands (including disturbed wet places, like ditches and low roadsides).
  • Question
    This plant is in Bucksport Maine. It was small - until I transplanted near an area of wetland on my property - then it seemed to explode! It is a perennial and has been in this spot 2-3 years. The leaves now are larger then my hand. I have not observed any flowers etc.
    Answer
    Dear dscheier, there is no image associated with your question. Therefore, I won't be able to help you with your question. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org.
  • Question
    Please identify the plants in the successive order. These are from India.
    Answer
    Dear srihari, I would like to help you, but my familiarity with Indian plants is quite limited. I can only share with you that the second image is a member of the legume family. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. If you need assistance finding someone in your region to help identify plants, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will find a local institution that can assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant has various shaped leaves all on the same stem. Several yellowish five petaled flowers hang together where the leaf stalks meet the stem. It was found near a stream in southern Vermont. I would like to know what it is. Thank you so much.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your plant is Nabalus altissimus (tall rattlesnake-root). The "flowers" are actually capitula (i.e., flower heads) comprised of five ray flowers (each petal-like structure is actually a separate flower). This is a native member of the composite family.
  • Question
    While doing a check for invasive plants near a stream on my property in southern Vermont, I came across several that I need to identify. These photos show two kinds of grass - there is one photo of each kind of grass as well as a photo of both grasses together. I think the first grass looks like Japanese Stiltgrass, but I need to be sure. I have no idea about the second kind. Can you help me?
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, I can only help you a little with these photographs. Grasses are very difficult to identify from images alone, especially those that lack images of the reproductive material. One of your images has flowers (white paper in background), that one appears to be of the genus Brachyelytrum (wood grass). It is likely Brachyelytrum aristosum (northern long-awned wood grass), but I would not be able to tell without close-up images of the spikelets themselves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This beautiful plant is growing in the moss on a decaying branch in southern Vermont. I can't identify it using the fern photos on Go Botany. Can you help me with this one too> Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, I'm sorry I can't help you with this one (not with confidence). The fern is both depauperate and has been damaged so its main growth axis is injured. I suspect it may be a species of Dryopteris (wood fern), possibly even a very small Dryopteris intermedia, but I would need to the specimen itself to be able to help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    These leaves are similar in shape to ones on the request I just sent you of the yellow flowering plant with varying leaf shapes, except these leaves seem to be growing separately out of the ground. I didn't follow them to see if they connected by runners underground. This isin southern Vermont. Thank you again.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, the majority of leaves in the image (which are lobed) are likely a species of Nabalus (rattlesnake-root). These are members of the composite family that were formerly included in the genus Prenanthes. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A couple of these are growing in a dry shade bed that I've been cleaning out. I've tried to identify them and they may be immature shrubs. Possible related to a dogwood, but I'm not sure. I need to know if they are weeds or beneficial natives to northeastern Massachusetts. I pulled one and it came out easily with a fine root system. Thanks for any help.
    Answer
    Dear Lennie, I can't tell you for sure what species this is from the images attached. To identify the shrub as a member of the dogwood group, you can carefully tear a leaf and notice that the veins have fibrous material that connects them (view this image online: http://i910.photobucket.com/albums/ac306/Pitdog_2010/003-14.jpg to see what I mean). While this will not identify the genus, it will identify the dogwood group. Your plant may be native or not. Benthamidia japonica (Kousa dogwood) has leaves similar to your plant but is native to Asia. I would not be able to help further without a specimen (unfortunately). I hope this is of some help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    well happen to run across this vine thata wraped along our fence in Grand Rapids Michigan and cant seem to find what it is lol
    Answer
    Dear Localmyth87, there is no image associated with your question, so I am unable to help you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The plant that is growing In my garden I think is wild because I did not plant it there. It's about 20 cm at the moment but I'm sure will grow bigger because it's just come up about a month ago. It's placed in a flower bed a right behind it is a fence and it get sunshine from about 9 o'clock to 5 depending when it's sunny.it is the plant my finger is on. This plant is in Ireland. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Amandakidd365, I'm sorry, but I do not recognize the plant you have posted images of. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern North America). While New England and parts of Europe do share remarkably similar plants (which means that sometimes I can help people in Europe), in this case I cannot. I would recommend that you contact someone at the National Botanic Gardens in Dublin (email: matthew.jebb@opw.ie) to help you with your plant question. There will be someone there who can assist you. Good luck.
  • Question
    Can you identify this weed which is growing in Lake Masscupic, Tyngsboro, MA in waist deep water. It appears to have no leaves. I have never seen this weed in any other lake or pond. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear DESelf, these look like the fruiting stalks of Vallisneria americana (tape-grass). This is a common, native, aquatic plant of lakes and slow-moving rivers.
  • Question
    This plant is growing all over the place around my house near Bangor, ME. My house is near the woods, this plant grows on the edge of the woods, on my dirt driveway. I think the fluffy things are the seedpods.
    Answer
    Dear Aviphile, I believe you are looking at clusters of the fruits of Trifolium arvense (rabbit-foot clover). While the image is not sharp enough for me to tell for sure, from what I can discern, it looks like this common species in fruit.
  • Question
    This little plant is in Virginia (Shenandoah Valley), comes up every year, short stemmed (round) and has the fragrance of peppermint, but is not of that genus. I hope you can identify, as my friend has tried for twenty years.
    Answer
    Dear Compos, sorry, I would very much like to help you, but the image that has been posted is too small and of too low a resolution for me to help you. If you can capture a higher quality image, I can try to assist further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here are 2 more pictures to help you with identifying this aquatic plant found in Lake Masscupic. The heads are just barley at the surface, water is too murky to see down to the root.
    Answer
    Dear DESelf, these look like the partially coiled peduncles of Vallisneria americana (tape-grass). The flowers are held at the water level by these unusual stalks. Tape-grass is a native aquatic plant.
  • Question
    Hi I'm wondering what plant this is and wether I should dig it up of leave it in my garden.
    Answer
    Dear Amandakidd365, from the images supplied, I'm not sure what the species of plant you have. I would need additional information. Most importantly, where are these photographs from (generally). Location information is very important for plant identification. Also, do you feel this is wild or cultivated? Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please identify the plant from the two images posted.
    Answer
    Dear srihari, there are no images associated with your post. If you are having trouble posting images, please feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will be happy to look at them. Be sure to include the region the plants are from, without this, I may not be able to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi again. I have this growing quite a bit on filled ground. It's about 3 feet tall, almost like a bush but it does not have a woody stem. No flowers to be seen. Leaves are toothed, and three stems with leaves grow from the stem. I broke off the top of the plant to take pictures.
    Answer
    Rocky, the plant you have photographed is a species of Melilotus (sweet-clover). Without flowers, I cannot tell you which species you have, but likely Melilotus officinalis (yellow sweet-clover) or M. albus (white sweet-clover). Both species are native to Europe and are introduced here in North America.
  • Question
    posting three photos for GoBotany of Woodwardia virginica that I feel show some characteristics of the plant that aren't well covered by the current photos, including the entertaining linear growth form you mention in the description. This is from the CACO Atlantic white cedar swamp boardwalk at Marconi Point.
    Answer
    Dear wernerehl, great photographs. Thank you for posting them.
  • Question
    I saw this plant beside the river in Shannock Rhode Island but cannot seem to identify it.
    Answer
    Dear franbot, this plant is Mikania scandens (climbing hempvine). This is most often found in riparian areas (such as you have found it). Thank you for sharing the great photographs.
  • Question
    sorry about the lack of close up lens but wondering if this might be nodding ladies tresses /spiranthes cernua ? Found in central NH in field edge
    Answer
    Dear greenhillfarmer, there is no image associated with your question, so I cannot help. If you are having trouble uploading images, please feel free to send them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist.
  • Question
    i have a question about bell peppers,why are they hollow? why do they have a paper-thin silicone like skin but on the inside it's dense thick and crunchy? are there pores in the inside for them to breathe ? if not how do they breathe? when you cut it into sections horizontally there are 3 main points where the 3 chambers meet and they get bigger or smaller the more you cut it, why is that? lastly are there any more facts you can give me about how it supports itself or anything else you may know?
    Answer
    Dear Sarayassin, I can't answer you as to why green peppers are hollow--that is simply the direction that was taken by those who domesticated the wild species that led to the cultivated pepper. The different layers of peppers are for different purposes (the exterior layer is to prevent desiccation). The three chambers are from the carpels that are fused together into one compound ovary. Each one of the chambers represents a carpel that was historically (evolutionarily speaking) separate in the ancestor. I hope this helps.
  • Question
    This flower came up in our flower garden any idea wat it is
    Answer
    Dear Nchoate, your plant appears to be Celosia argentea (cock's-comb), a cultivated member of the Amaranthaceae (amaranth family). Different cultivars have different color flowers (red, orange, yellow, and pink are the most common forms).
  • Question
    I am getting married next September in Southern NH and we plan to have our floral decorations in planting pots then plant the flowers after the event. As a result, I want to make sure we use native plants that are hardy enough to handle the transplant. While I know exactly which plants I'd use if I were back home (Seattle) I'm unfamiliar with the new england flora. Any one have recommendations?
    Answer
    Dear katespencer, I would recommend that you contact the horticulture staff at the Garden in the Woods and ask for some recommendations. Mark (mrichardson[at]newenglandwild.org) should be able to direct you to someone who can help out with your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have found two of these plants with berries in a flower garden where I planted annuals and a package of mixed wildflower seeds. When I crush a berry it has numerous tiny seeds which are green with a brown end on them. I am located in southern Vermont. I am curious what they are.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your plant is Solanum ptycanthum (eastern black nightshade), a native member of the nightshade genus that often occurs in disturbed habitats (such as agricultural areas and logging operations), though it is also found in undisturbed habitats as well. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm not sure if this plant is from NE or not. Can you identify what type of plant this is? Thank you, John
    Answer
    Dear John, you have photographed a very interesting looking plant, but I do not know what it is. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England, and some cultivated species (such as you have photographed) are unknown to me. Sorry I cannot help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am on a quest to find Gorse (Ulex europaeus) in Essex county, Ma. Go Botany map shows a concentration there. I spend a lot of time in Essex county, Parker river NWR, Essex bay, Trustees properties, Essex greenbelt etc. Where can I find some? Be specific. I lived in Ireland as a child where gorse was very common. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear tcplants, if you were to visit this page: http://kiki.huh.harvard.edu/databases/specimen_index.html, it is a specimen search of collections at the Harvard University Herbaria. Enter the genus "Ulex" and the specific epithet "europaeus" and you will get results for a number of specimens in eastern MA, though most are located on Nantucket Island. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Cannot find this on the website. Growing in poor ground where I planted a wildflower mix I got from Johnny's. The second picture tries to show the leaves. Thanks Rosemary
    Answer
    Dear Rocky, your plant is a species of Papaver (poppy). It appears to be either Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy) or Papaver dubium (long-podded poppy), but I cannot see some details well enough to tell you. If you are able to get an image of the fruit later this season, I will be able to tell you which poppy you are photographing. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found something growing in my yard and have no idea what it is. The leaves are similar to a banana plant, it has numerous small white flowers on the ends of branches, which are now producing bracts of small green berries. It doesn't have a central stem like a tree but is now over six feet tall. I really hesitate to remove it because it is attractive, but I don't know how to take care of it or if it's safe to have around. Thank you, Rose McDonald
    Answer
    RoseMcDonald, your plant is Phytolacca americana (American pokeweed). It is a robust, native, herbaceous plant with white flowers and small black fruits.
  • Question
    I found this Impatiens glandulifera Royle in High Falls Park Campground. I've never seen this color touch me not before are they rare?
    Answer
    Dear PaulaLeslie, this species (like other species of Impatiens) does show variation in the color patterns. Some of them are quite striking. I've seen ones somewhat similar to the images you have posted. Thank you for sharing with us.
  • Question
    I found a specimen of pokeweed in our vegetable garden. It was over seven feet tall before I found out what it was and learned that it is toxic. My husband and I removed it. We were shocked to see how large the tap root was, as big around as a man's arm, more than four feet long, and the feeder roots went all through the vegetable bed. Most were as big around as a broom handle. My question: (Finally) Is the soil now contaminated from the toxic substances in the root system? Should we remove it?
    Answer
    Dear RoseMcDonald, the toxicity of wild plants is almost always exaggerated. This plant is poisonous if consumed in sufficient amounts, but please be aware that it is a well known and often eaten edible plant, especially in the southeastern United States (it is gathered as a spring green and the young shoots/leaves are eaten). Your soil is not contaminated with toxic substances. You can remove it or not (depending on your preferences). I find the plant quite beautiful and enjoy eating the early season greens (but it may not fit in with your plantings and plant uses). I hope this is helpful and wish you the best.
  • Question
    I submitted prior but not with enough info so I hope this will help. The plant was found in Holyoke Massachusetts. It appears to be a succulent. It was growing wild in the lawn and had beautiful red flowers. Today t was in bloom again so I sending another picture. Maybe you can help me identify with this info.
    Answer
    Dear valk2000, thank you for the additional information--I am able to help you now. Your plant is Portulacca grandiflora (cultivated purslane), a native to the Old World. It is found naturalized in a few scattered locations in southern and western New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant grows wildly near our vegetable garden. I would like to know if they are toxic or invasive. It's located at metrowest Boston area.
    Answer
    Dear Gardenorch, the plant you have pictured is Phtyolacca americana (American pokeweed). It is a robust, native herbaceous plant that is edible in the early part of the year (as a young green) but can be toxic if ingested in large amounts later in the season. It is not invasive, but many find the plant quite beautiful. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found these growing in my backyard in pine-needles. Are they some kind of mushroom? These are growing in Salem , Massachusetts
    Answer
    Dear Johnny, the plants that you are photographing are Monotropa uniflora (one-flowered Indian-pipe). It is a non-photosynthetic plant that utilizes a fungus to acquire its food. These are native species that are in the Ericaceae (the health family, along with blueberry, huckleberry, and cranberry).
  • Question
    Greetings: I am currently transcribing the 19th Century Journals of Georgiana Craven, a British Noblewoman. She is a great lover of Gardens and Botany and speaks of various plant and flowers often using the Latin term. Her handwriting is quite challenging and difficult to decipher. I am attaching a portion of an entry from her Journal where she sees a plant that seems to start with "La" the word "wood" precedes" it and it has Blue Bells. I'm hoping you can help me.
    Answer
    Dear gipsont, good morning. I've tried for a couple of days to examine the writing you provided and decipher what plant may be listed. However, I am still unable to figure out what they wrote. I'm sorry I can't help you with your research.
  • Question
    Please help identify? Located in central VT (Barnard). Self-germinated in a small flower garden near my house surrounded by lawn. Is about 5 feet tall, and the only one. I was referred to you by the UVM Extension Service. Thanks for your help.
    Answer
    Dear killamfarm, your plant is likely Ambrosia trifida (giant ragweed). This is a native, early successional species commonly found in areas of disturbed soils (e.g., roadsides, agricultural fields). The leaves show an unusual pattern of serrations for this species, but otherwise the images look like a very good match. You can confirm this hypothesis by examining images on the internet of this species.
  • Question
    This plant is by a stream, damp all day, in shade all day, southern vermont. The texture is tough, hard..it's not normal stem or leaf texture. Would appreciate knowing what it is! That's my finger near it so it's quite small but I did see some larger ones, but I couldn't reach them. They're all tangled together in one big mess. This one was separate from the crowd and I could reach it.
    Answer
    julietamler, I can't see the plants in the image clearly, so you should confirm the tentative answer I provide here. The stems look like those of Equisetum scorpoides (dwarf scouring-rush). If you examine images on the internet, you may be able to determine if this hypothesis is correct. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi Arthur, can you tell what species this is from these pictures? Found in Wendell, ma on side of road.
    Answer
    Dear foamflower, the image appears to be of a fruiting plant of Asclepias exaltata (poke milkweed), a native species in the dogbane family. The fruits (a follicle) of this species are smooth and without the soft prickle-like processes found in the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca).
  • Question
    This plant was found on the edge of the Connecticut River, growing in the sand. There was ground cherry and monkey flower nearby. The photo was taken this week. THANKS for your help with ID.
    Answer
    Dear Muskrat, there are no images associated with your question. Without them I cannot help you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to send them by email to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you with your questions.
  • Question
    Could you tell me what this plant is? The bees seem to love it. Also I found this insect that looks like a leaf insect, which I thought was tropical.
    Answer
    Dear Shubhada, the plant you have photographed appears to be a species of Senna (also known by the common name of senna). I can't tell you exactly which species it is because one of the images is too blurry. I also can't tell you whether or not any species are native in your area because I don't know where the images were taken. Sorry I cannot be more helpful.
  • Question
    I found this along the tree belt in front of my home. I had red flowers.
    Answer
    Dear valk2000, good morning. Unfortunately, without knowing where the plant came from and a view of the red flowers, I would only be able to offer guesses at what the plant is. Location information is vitally important for plant identification. If you should have images of the flowers, please post them and I can try to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you tell me what this plant is called?
    Answer
    Dear judy, the plant looks very interesting, but I do not know its name. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Questions from outside the topic area are sometimes difficult to provide answers to. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, thanks so much for this site! I found this plant in the wooded area behind my house and I hope that you will be able to identify it. It's the only one back there that I can find. I live in the Saratoga area of New York. Kind regards, Robyn
    Answer
    Dear RobynP54, your plant is a fruiting individual of Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-pulpit). This is a native member of the Araceae that occurs primarily in forests and wetlands. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Understory tree, opposite leaves, 4-part fused seed capsule, bark is light colored, buds green, does not look like any dogwood I have seen. Groton MA
    Answer
    Dear mmetzger42, Unfortunately, I can't tell you with confidence what the species is because the images lack a good view of the leaves and some are blurry. The leaf arrangement, color of the branchlets, and what I can see of the fruit all suggest a species of Euonymus (spindle-tree), a genus of non-native species in the Celastraceae. I hope this gets you started in your study of this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hey folks, thanks for accepting me as a member first of all. My question is, one of my friends was going to discard a 10 inch wide planter that still had a live plant in it. She assumed it was dead. I've resuscitated it, and it's now grown to over 3-4 ft. tall, and looks as though it's about to blossom. I am curious as to what type of plant it is, as she can't recall. West Virginia.
    Answer
    Dear tke735, the plant you have photographed is Erechtites hieraciifolius (American burnweed). This is a native member of the Asteraceae (aster family) that is common in disturbed areas.
  • Question
    Dear Botanist, This tree grows in Natick, MA. I am assuming it is a maple, but I'm wondering what kind of maple has this kind of leaf: five-lobed, but no pointy edges like the sugar or Norway maples. My first guess would be Hedge maple, but isn't the bark too smooth? Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear yigalagam, your maple in the photographs certainly appears to be Acer campestre (hedge maple). The bark texture varies by age of the plant, so a young individual would not have the furrowed bark of older trees. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, Found this plant in my yard is about 4 feet high. need advice on removing etc.
    Answer
    Dear evian, your plant is a species of Datura (thorn-apple), a member of the Solanaceae (nightshade family). These plants are frequent weeds in agricultural areas. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I was given this plant several years ago, not sure what it is, just wondering how to care for it and perhaps re-pot it. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Dotster, Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we are happy to entertain all plant-related questions, yours is certainly better directed to an organization that focuses on potted, indoor plants. If you need help finding such organizations, please feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can help refine your searches. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am molecular plant virologist in tropical Africa. I recently found this plant in the costal region of Benin republic in West Africa with typical Geminivirus symptoms but don't the scientific name. Need help with its Identification.
    Answer
    Dear WalterLeke, Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. As such, there are many plant questions that are outside of our geographical range of expertise. I suggest you contact the folks at Herbier National du Bénin (a museum that would have expertise in the region you are interested in, the address is: Faculte des Sciences et Technique, Université National du Bénin, Campus Universitaire d'Abomey-Calavi, 01 B.P. 4521 Cotonou, Benin. And you can email the staff at: akoegnin@syfed.bj.refer.org. Good luck with your project.
  • Question
    I encountered this shrub in an area of Rutland, MA where I had previously seen eastern wahoo. The shrub was about 6 feet tall. The area is wooded and near a pond. The property was once a state hospital with homes for employees. All buildings have been removed and everything is wild now but there had been plantings one would associate with with those homes. Yesterday I saw I saw the wahoo, japanese honeysuckle, a crabapple tree with 1.5 inch apples near this shrub.
    Answer
    Dear mharr08, your plant is likely Lespedeza bicolor (two-colored bush-clover). This species is an uncommon introduction in southern and western New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi GoBotanist! I'm wondering about starting my own plant collection. Are there any species you'd recommend I start with to establish a standard/representational assemblage of New England plants? I'm primarily interested in plants bearing flowers/fruit and woody plants, but any suggestions are welcome!
    Answer
    Dear rainbowbagels, building a personal herbarium collection is a very good way to learn plants and have reference collections for identification. What species you collect is completely up to you and your goals for the collection. Some people collect to document the presence of a plant or the spread of a non-native. Others collect certain species for taxonomic study. Still others gather species that they are drawn to for aesthetic reasons. Determine what the goals of your herbarium will be and use those as guidelines for collection. If you want to discuss further, feel free to correspond with me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org.
  • Question
    This grows along side the driveway, getting up to 3 ft tall. Reminds me of rhubard, same shaped stem and growing habit.
    Answer
    Rocky, good morning. I can't help you without additional information. I would need to know where (generally) this plant is growing and would need a picture of the underside of the leaf. Also, you mention it grows three feet tall--do you have images of the flowers? Feel free to send these items to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I'm happy to try and assist you.
  • Question
    This plant was growing off the coast of Central California, it looks like mint family, but which? Is this edible ? Thanks, Janet
    Answer
    Dear lillylangtree, good morning. I'm sorry I cannot help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we are happy to entertain all botanical questions, some species from outside the northeast will not be well known to us. I suggest you contact folks at the Jepson Herbarium, who are position in CA and may be able to help. Good luck.
  • Question
    This plant was located in Massapequa park on Long Island 11758.. I was curious what these plants were.
    Answer
    Dear paulc, the shrub you have photographed is Rhus copallinum (winged sumac), a native species of open and shrubby areas in relatively dry soils. The glossy, pinnately compound leaves with a wing of tissue along the leaf rachis (between the leaflets) are good identifying characters.
  • Question
    Hi GoBotany Team. In regards to the spicebush issue in Lincoln, MA. I didn't observe any sawdust and I didn't think to look for feeding damage to the leaves-- there weren't many leaves to look at though. I'm happy to supply more specific info if needed. I'd also love to know if I should contact anyone else about this issue in case it is a problem we can help (or contain).
    Answer
    AWilkins, thanks for your observations. I will mention your experience with Lindera benzoin to some other botanists and see if others have noticed a similar pattern. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in the Boston area and need some help identifying a tree growing in my back yard (two specimens, and I have seen one other in conservation land). See images for what it looks like now (summer). Leaf arrangement seems alternate, and the leaves are arranged in pairs. In the spring of 2014 both trees had magnificent white flowers (single flowers, not in clusters). However, this spring we didn't see any. In winter the leaf scars protrude and look a little like flower buds. Bark is scaly.
    Answer
    Dear yigalagam, the plant is likely a species of Benthamidia (big-bracted-dogwood). These species were formerly placed in the genus Cornus and were called flowering dogwoods. I can't tell for certain without flowers or fruits, but it looks like Benthamidia florida (flowering big-bracted-dogwood), which is a native species.
  • Question
    Hello, I just moved to Freeport, ME near the coast. Our landscape is wooded and has some wet areas. There is a variety of moss and ferns. I am trying to identify many of the woodland plants on our property. I have taken several photos. The first is a photo of a plant that is everywhere in the forest and along the roadside. I'm not sure if it is a seedling but it has not seemed to change over the last month. The color is now starting to yellow on some of the plants.
    Answer
    Dear orocketw, the plant in your images is Aralia nudicaulis (wild sarsaparilla), a native species of the Apiaceae (celery family) and a common understory component of Maine forests.
  • Question
    This one plant popped up in my new vegetable garden (suburb of Boston). The pods look like beans, and the root starts to look like a beet, but I didn't plant those things! Thanks if you can help.
    Answer
    Dear crownclctr@verizon.net, the plant in your images is Raphanus raphanistrum (wild radish). It is a wild relative of the cultivated radish. And like that cultivated species, its flowers, young fruits, and leaves taste like radish (i.e., a spicy mustard flavor). Raphanus raphanistrum can be a common weed in cultivated areas.
  • Question
    I found this plant on a mountain overlooking Lake Champlain in Northern Vermont. I tried using the Simple Key (which is fantastic btw!), but the closest looking plant is Filipendula I think.
    Answer
    Dear JenW, the shrub pictured in your images is Spiraea alba (white meadowsweet), a native member of the Rosaceae (rose family). Spiraea alba is a relatively common plant of many moist to wet open habitats.
  • Question
    I ahve a flower pictyure that was taken in italy two weeks ago, I am tryting to identify the flowers. attached the picture thank you
    Answer
    Dear alsanaf, good morning and thank you for sharing your wonderful image. The shrubs look like a species of Hydrangea (also called hydrangea as their common name). I do not have deep expertise in cultivated plants, so providing a genus name is the best I can do for you. But hopefully this gets you started in your study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    i found this shrub on a wooded hillside in Amesbury, MA. on 7-26-15. The bell-like, white flowers were quite distinctive. Could this be an escapee? Chaffee Monell
    Answer
    chaffeemonell, good morning. The plant you have photographed is Apocynum androsaemifolium (spreading dogbane). This is a native, perennial her that frequents open areas and woodlands. If you look closely you might find a beautiful, iridescent beetle (opal beetle) that is commonly found on this plant.
  • Question
    hello ,I am in India and I want to ask a question. My chilli plant is bearing flowers but is not bearing fruit. Please help me to find the reason why is it so?
    Answer
    Dear neha, thank you for your question but Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. You may want to contact an organization that specializes is cultivated food plants to find an answer to your question. Good luck.
  • Question
    if anyone can tell me the organic methods to remove termites from the soil. they are causing damage to my plants.
    Answer
    Dear neha, Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I'm sorry that I cannot help you with your question about insect pests. I would encourage you to perform a web search using the search terms termite+control+organic and see what you come up with. Good luck with your research.
  • Question
    What type of plant is this? Has a hot pink flower and the plant itself looks like a succulent.
    Answer
    Dear jasonhetrick, Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we are happy to entertain most plant questions, answers about cultivated plants will not always be known. I'm sorry that I do not recognize this cultivar. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Following up on my last query, here are two better photos. I was wrong: this shrub/tree (it grows to about 20') has opposite branching.
    Answer
    Dear David, this shrub looks like Viburnum sieboldii (Siebold's arrowwood). If this determination is correct, the fresh leaves will smell strongly of green pepper when bruised or crushed (as a way for you to confirm this hypothesis). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi I saw an orchid with three basal leaves and two blue fruits in Princeton MA it was about a foot tall I saw it in late July could you please tell me what it is thank you
    Answer
    Dear ecurwitz, no, I'm sorry, I cannot tell you what species it is without an image or a detailed description. There are many tens of orchid species that is could have been, depending on what habitat you were found in. If you can get an image, I would be happy to try to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I get these in my yard every year on cape cod Massachusetts they get a small ivory colored bell shaped flower. Do you know what they ate?
    Answer
    Dear mollyscatering27, there is no image attached with your question. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will help out (if I can).
  • Question
    Thank you for your answer about Ornithogalum umbellatum. It's curious that "ornitho" appears in the genus name. Something birdlike in the plant or in the mind of the namer! Yesterday my wife snapped this photo of a shrub/tree growing along the side of Middle Road in Chilmark, MA, with interesting clusters of fruits and very veined leaves (I believe they grow alternately but am not sure). Your ideas? I can return and get more photos if that would be helpful.
    Answer
    Dear David, the name Ornithogalum derives from "ornis" (bird) and "gala" (milk), which is stated to be an allusion to the color of the flowers. I would need to see other images of the plant you have posted--but it may be a species of Viburnum. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this Artiplx patula or A. acadiensis? It is growing prostrate on the beach (Narragansett Bay, Jamestown RI), 7 ft+ diameter, just above the full-moon high tide line, in a narrow strip with Sea Rocket, Saltwort, Beach Clotbur, Wild Radish, and Pigweed. Leaves green, only stem joints are red. Same species (I think) grows upright among Phragmites behind the beach. I'm unable to find acadiensis as either a species or variety in Vascular Flora of RI(1998). When was it recognized as a species?
    Answer
    Dear restoretpoint, I cannot identify the Atriplex with 100% confidence because features of the flowers are not available in the images you supplied. Based on the leaf morphology, it is likely Atriplex prostrate (hastate-leaved orache), but it is possible for it to be other species. Atriplex acadiensis usually has a cuneate (wedge-shaped) leaf base, not a truncate base as in your photograph. An image of the array of flowers and close-up of the fruits would be necessary for a precise determination. Hopefully this educated guess will provide you the direction you need.
  • Question
    Hello, I just recently (within days) saw mysterious orange colored plant like structures showing up in my backyard lawn especially where the moss is growing.I have attached pictures of one of them (there are around 4-5) and would appreciate any help in identifying them and more importantly how to effectively eradicate them as well.
    Answer
    Dear jackal65, the organism in your images appears to be a stinkhorn fungus (order Phallales). These fungi are not of the typical mushroom shape and are much less commonly observed. The structure you are seeing is the spore-producing part of the fungus, most of it is below the ground level and comprised of filamentous hyphae (i.e., it would be difficult to eradicate).
  • Question
    Hello, I just recently (within days) saw mysterious orange colored plant like structures showing up in my backyard lawn especially where the moss is growing.I have attached pictures of one of them (there are around 4-5) and would appreciate any help in identifying them and more importantly how to effectively eradicate them as well.
    Answer
    Dear jackal65, there are no images associated with your question. If you are having trouble posting pictures, please feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org so that I can help you with the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This lily volunteers in my garden in Harrisville, NH. It likes very wet soils and grows 6"-8" tall It is a spring bloom and grows from a small bulb. Perhaps it is an escape or survivor from a former garden?
    Answer
    Dear DavidBlair, the plant in the images appears to be Ornithogalum umbellatum (nap-at-noon), a member of the Hyacinthaceae. This species is native to Europe and is infrequently naturalized to the states of New England. Thank you for sharing the excellent photographs.
  • Question
    Hello. A lot of Poison Ivy plants in my area are infested with this strange growth. By Google imaging a description, I found another example, but the author didn't know what it was. I live in the Amesbury-Newburyport area.
    Answer
    chaffeemonell, this is a gall on the Toxicodendron plant. I do not know the insect that has created it. Most of the galls that are found on this genus appears more as small red bumps on the blade surfaces, rather than a congested area of unusual growth. This might require an entomologist to answer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I am trying to figure out what plant this is. I thought it was broadleaf plaintain, but I am told it isn't. I just don't know. Can you please help? Thank you!!! It is from New England, zone 5.
    Answer
    Dear lillylangtree, I do not know with confidence what your plant is. There are several species that resemble the plant in this image. The leaves look very much like those found in Erigeron annuus (annual fleabane), but I would need to see a later stage to be sure. If you are able to supply images from later in the season, that would be very useful. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is this? I'd
    Answer
    Sofie, please try again with your post. There is no image and your message is clearly truncated.
  • Question
    Hi! Would you be able to help me identify a plant I found on a recent trip to Vietnam? I've been trying to identify what kind of plant it is but have been unsuccessful in my search. The picture uploaded is a prickly bud that grows into a small flower.
    Answer
    Dear cristinagirl23, there is no image associated with your question. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America--I may or may not recognize a plant from Vietnam. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm noticing that all of the spicebush in one of our conservation areas are dying. We're in Lincoln, MA. The sweet-pepperbush and other ferns and shrubs (including poison sumac) in the same area seems to be fine so I'm thinking it's not the dry summer. The leaves shriveled up and brown and then it re-sprouts at the base but even those leaves quickly turn brown. It is affecting virtually every single bush. Is there a known pathogen that attacks spicebush? It's quite shocking.
    Answer
    Dear AWilkins, in the south they are having serious problems with the ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus) and associated fungus Raffaelea lauricola which causes "laurel wilt". This is known from the southeastern US, but there could be similar items at work in the northeast. Have you seen any signs of beetle activity (like holes in the wood or sawdust from beetle activity)? Thanks for supplying this observation.
  • Question
    Hi! I wanted to see if I can get confirmation on this plant. It's growing in a partially shaded flower bed in coastal Massachusetts and is located underneath where I had a bird feeder last summer. It's 6.5' tall, has both 3 lobed and 5 lobed simple leaves with small teeth, though younger leaves don't appear to be lobed. Big stem which appears to have small hairs. No flowers yet, though lots of spikes. Thank you for your help!
    Answer
    Dear jbasi, thank you for the nice array of quality images. Your plant is Ambrosia trifida (giant ragweed), a member of the Asteraceae. This is an early successional plant that is native to the United States. Best wishes.
  • Question
    near the seaside in Mass, a bush with many petaled brown/red flowers (about an inch fluffed out) and upside-down acorn shaped but a little fatter seed pods, less than an inch in diameter. Leaves paired, smooth edgeds and like magnolia leaves in shape but smeller. ?
    Answer
    Dear nell, I would need to see images to be able to help you out. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist.
  • Question
    I would like help identifying this particular plant, I live in north eastern CT and it grows all over my yard either by itself or within my other bushes and flowers and also gets fairly tall if not cut down. I'm not entirely sure what this could be. Thank you for any input someone could give in identifying this plant.
    Answer
    Dear IMSarette, there are no images associated with your question, so I cannot help you. If you are having difficulty posting images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist.
  • Question
    Found trailing thick stemmed red vine,morning glory like leaves, one or two at nodes with clusters of small five point flowers. On bank near disturbed area full sun. Groton MA
    Answer
    Dear mmetzger42, your plant is a species of Fallopia (bindweed). I can't see the necessary details to give you a confident identification, but it is likely Fallopia cilinodis (fringed bindweed) or Fallopia scandens (climbing bindweed), our two most common species. Both of these are native vines. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This Carrot family (Apiaceae) plant is growing at the edge of a small pond, just feet from a road, in Kennebunk, Maine. Photos were taken 7/21 and 7/23/15. My attempts at keying it out have thus far been unsuccessful. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear Fecteau23, you have photographed, what appears to be, Peucedanum palustre (milk-parsley). While this plant has been collected in New England, it has not be documented from ME. If possible, it would be good to collect a specimen that can be deposited in a museum and confirm that the stem is hollow. Feel free to contact me to discuss further (if you would like) at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Best wishes.
  • Question
    My veg garden plants are covered by unknown plants, it's flower are purple and leaves are of heart shape, can anybody tell me what plant is that?
    Answer
    Dear brpatel54, your plant is a species of Ipomoea (morning-glory), a member of the Convolvulaceae. I cannot tell you for certain which species without close-up images, but it looks very similar to Ipomoea purpurea (common morning-glory). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'd love help with this plant. It's growing on a fairly dry woodland in Massachusetts. It's the first year I've noticed the flower, but there are probably 30 of them all growing in one patch. It has a white tubular flower; five sepals; leaves are alternate and very slightly toothed.
    Answer
    Dear alcatjan, I am not able to identify your plant. Would it be possible to get images of the plant in the habitat they grow in? If you are able to acquire additional images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org . Best wishes.
  • Question
    Wondering if someone could identify this plant found in Green Mountains in southern VT. It was a fairly wet woods with moss and spruce trees. Saw a lesser fringed orchis in a really damp area nearby. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear c.chalmers, I do not know what you have photographed. Without flowers or fruits, this one is a mystery. It does look to me much like a species of Trillium that is producing a single leaf (this happens from time to time and the leaf morphology is very similar to what you have photographed). If you are able to get additional images, feel free to post them or send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org .
  • Question
    Good afternoon! Could you please help with this plant. Growing singly, Only basal leaves, deciduous forest on Storrs, CT. Hairy stems.
    Answer
    Dear KDC, you have photographed what appears to be a species of Nabalus. I would not be able to tell you which species without flowers or fruits, though Nabalus altissimus (synonym: Prenanthes altissima), tall rattlesnake-root, is a likely candidate.
  • Question
    I found a plant growing in my yard, it is about a foot tall and it is redish purple stem and leaves. Could you please give me any information you could. I tried to upload a picture but it want let me. Thank you. Sabrina I live in kentucky.
    Answer
    Dear Sabrina, there is no image associated with your question. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. I will try to help, but be aware that Go Botany is a site dedicated to wild plants of New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I saw this plant in Green Mountain National forest where there were old homesteads years ago. Looks like a naturalized hydrangea to me, but not sure. Is there a native plant this might be instead? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear c.chalmers, the plant in your photographs is Ageratina altissima (white snakeroot), a member of the aster family that is frequently found in moist soils of deciduous forests. This is a native species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in field Behind my house in Maine - within 100 feet of vernal wetland/pond but dry now in summer. Is it a white fringed orchid?
    Answer
    Dear Croline1818, good morning. What a wonderful orchid sighting. Your species is Platanthera lacera (green fringed bog orchid). This species differs from Platanthera blephariglottis (white fringed bog orchid) in that the lower, larger petal is split into three fringed lobes (instead of a single lobe) and have a green-tinge to the white petals (instead of being pure white). Enjoy the orchid.
  • Question
    I am caretaking an urban garden in Concord NH and have had trouble identifying this plant. It is 4 feet tall currently and has lush healthy foliage. I believe it is woody and bamboo-like, and think it may be an invasive species. Can you help me to identify it? Thank you so much!
    Answer
    Dear BethieB, your plant in the photographs is a species of Persicaria (smartweed) in the Polygonaceae (knotweed family). I cannot tell you which species (in this case) without seeing flowers and/or fruits. If you are able to captures images of the reproductive plants, including close-ups of the flowers, I can help your further at that time. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have found only one of these flowers between my driveway and the woods. It has been blooming for several weeks now. Can you identify it for me? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your photographs show Berteroa incana (hoary false alyssum), a non-native member of the Brassicaceae (mustard family). This species is usually associated with human-disturbed locations, like lawns, road edges, and such areas.
  • Question
    I found this red stemmed vine with compound leaves of five leaflets and a fuzzy bud (shown in the second photo) growing along the ground in southern Vermont. I have been unable to identify it. Can you help me?
    Answer
    Yes, lmc825, I can help you. Your plant is Potentilla simplex (old field cinquefoil). This is a member of the Rosaceae (rose family) that is often found in open habitats.
  • Question
    I have been watching this plant for a couple of years but never seem to see the flower. Here it is with green berries a few weeks ago. It grows in the shade of other trees on the roadside in southern Vermont. It is 1-1/2 to 2 feet tall. I would like to know more about it. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your plant is Actaea pachypoda (white baneberry), a native member of the crowfoot family. This and its close relative (Actaea rubra) are relatively commonly members of deciduous forest communities on moist soils. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I live in Massachusetts in Boston, and I found this flower at the edge of a woody area next to a park. There weren't any others like it nearby. Internet sleuthing suggests it's impatiens balfourii, but I can't find that in your key as a New England species. Can you confirm, and if so, what is it doing here?
    Answer
    Dear aperrin2, the species in your image looks like Impatiens glandulifera (Himalaya touch-me-not). This is a robust, herbaceous plant that can be quite aggressive in its growth. This species is known to be introduced in several states of New England, including MA. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, could you identify this for me? My first instinct was that it was a species of viburnum, but I think I am wrong. The leaves are opposite, entire, and slightly toothed. It was found along a roadside in southern Vermont.
    Answer
    Dear Gardenbed, your image appears to be of a species of Hydrangea (in the Hydrangeaceae). I could not tell you which species with confidence without additional images, but hopefully knowing the genus will get you started on your study of this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    focus on flowers when I saw these pretty flowers on garden, so only flower photos, would you identify it? thank you
    Answer
    Dear liku, beautiful images, thank you for sharing. However, I will not be able to help you identify these. They images present only the flowers, and I don't have any images of the leaves and stems to assist with identification. I don't know where the images are from--without this information there are nearly 500,000 species worldwide that I would have to sort through. I'm sorry I can't help, but would need much more information than presented to give you some direction with your images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I took this beautiful flower on stone mountain park, GA would you give me this flower name? thank you
    Answer
    Dear liku, you have photographed a species of Polygala (milkwort). It is similar to our northeastern species Polygala sanguinea (blood milkwort), though there are other species in GA that your plant could be. Hopefully knowing the genus will get you started with your study of this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    find in stone mountain park, ga, would you give me the name? thank you
    Answer
    liku, I'm sorry, but there is no image associated with this post. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to help (though please be aware that GA is far out of my region of expertise--Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you identify this squah type?
    Answer
    Dear kenkathome, no, I'm not able to identify the squash for you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild species of New England. I would not know if the leaves you have pictured are normal for this species or infected with a virus (e.g., Watermelon Mosaic Potyvirus), which can cause similar patterns to what you have in the image. Sorry I cannot help you further.
  • Question
    Found this along the fence line at Joppa Flats, Newburyport. I haven't notices flowers or fruits on it yet, so I assume it is sexually immature (about 4-6 feet tall). The variable leaves make me think Mulberry, and the map makes me think White Mulberry. The leaves also seem reminiscent of currants, but none in the genus seemed to match. Didn't notice any thorns pointing to hawthorn. The photo was taken at the end of June.
    Answer
    Dear chaffee, your plant is a species of Malus (apple), specifically one of the ornamental species that has escaped cultivation. I cannot tell you with confidence which species you have photographed without flowers/fruits. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I transplanted this plant to my garden last year due to the beautiful leaves and flowers. It was found here in VIrginia. In an open field type area in full sun. Are you able to tell me what this is.
    Answer
    Dear Kim, your plant is Securigera varia (crown-vetch). It is a non-native species that sometimes aggressively colonizes open areas. I agree that it is a beautiful plant, you just may want to watch it carefully to prevent it from crowding other plants in your garden. Best wishes.
  • Question
    12 to 18" high, yellow five petal flower,quarter inch, flower is toothed, leaves very lobed, acidic soil,edge of forest... What is it?
    Answer
    Dear julietamler, your plant is Mycelis muralis (wall-lettuce), a species native to the Old World and introduced in North America. It is a member of the aster family and is closely related to lettuce (genus Lactuca).
  • Question
    Hello, After pursuing your leads to my previous post, I found it was Geranium robertianum (mountain crane's-bill) also know as Herb Robert. I appreciate you help in finding this as it was in parent's garden. I would like to include this in my garden as it is nostalgic to me. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear bobhamas, so happy to be of help. Thanks for posting.
  • Question
    Can you identify this plant? It is low lying and pungent smell with light pick flowers. The picks were recently taken at the Sonnenberg Gardens, Canandaigua NY and the while in Niagara Falls Canada. I have been looking on the web with no luck. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear bobhamas, unfortunately, the image that has been posted is too blurry for me to help you. I can tell this is a member of the Geraniaceae (geranium family), but I can't tell you whether or not it is a species of Erodium (stork's-bill) or Geranium robertianum (mountain crane's-bill). If you are able to get a higher quality image I would be able to assist you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you help me identify this plant found in Ravenna,MI? I have been scouring the web with no luck.
    Answer
    Dear jmarjor01, the structure you have photographed is a gall, and it is occurring on what is most likely Salix humilis (prairie willow). The galls are a growth created by an insect larvae living within the plant tissue. Beautiful photograph.
  • Question
    Low creeping (prostrate) plant found in really wet area (mucky and wet) in Wilmington MA.. Square stem. Vaguely aromatic leaves. Note little pair of flower structure (calyx) in leaf axle. Am thinking Lamiaceae, maybe Scutellaria sp., but can find no matches in my guides. Any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear MichaelWetlands, your plant is likely Glechoma hederacea (Gill-over-the-ground), a species in the Lamiaceae. This plants produces leaves as you have pictured and does sometimes have only two flowers at each node on the lower portion of the plant. You might want to compare images on Go Botany to help confirm this suggestion. Best wishes.
  • Question
    The plant I've photographed appeared as if intentionally planted in our semi-shade back garden this spring. Foliage like fennel, no fragrance, 3'tall and now producing daisy like flowers. My i.d. from simple key:Tripleurospermum inodorum. Will it become invasive if I leave it, or should I get rid of the plant now?
    Answer
    Dear HostaHeuchera2, from what I can tell from the images, it does look like you have photographed Tripleurospermum inodorum. While these plants are "weedy", I rarely see them being aggressive in New England. Whether or not you leave it depends on your personal taste and how much you enjoy its presence. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you please help me identify this shrub? I live in the state of Virginia.
    Answer
    Dear darsee100, there are no images attached to your post, so, unfortunately, I cannot help you. Please feel free to send images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org if you are having trouble posting them and I will attempt to help (or direct you to places that may be able to assist). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This little group of plants grows in one spot in my yard (wooded) in Canton, MA. It hasn't spread like poison ivy, but I haven't seen them flower like trillium. The biggest is about 4 inches tall. Three leaves, red stem. Do you know what it is? Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear JayneM, your plant is Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-pulpit). This is a native member of the Araceae (arum family). The flowering plants are really interesting to view (you can see pictures on the Go Botany website). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I inherited this lovely little when I took over this office. Will you tell me what it is?
    Answer
    Dear sdodge88, your plant appears to be Ficus elastica (rubber plant). It is a member of the Moraceae (mulberry family) that is native to Asia. The latex from this plant has been used to make rubber.
  • Question
    I found this at the edge of a cranberry bog in Duxbury, MA, July 5th, 2015. It was at the edge of the cranberry ditch, but not in the water. I think it's common, but couldn't identify it. The plant is about 3 feet tall, and the flower clusters are about 6-10" per stalk. The leaves are simple, with no lobes and not paired, not notched.
    Answer
    Dear janderbing, your plant is a species of Rumex (dock), a member of the Polygonaceae (knotweed family). I would not be able to tell you which species you have photographed with any confidence without images of the leaves and more close-up images of the fruits. Hopefully, this identification gets you started on your study of this plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, following up on a previous email, are the attached photos any better for identifying the type of knapper? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Marinar, thank you for posting more images. The capitula (i.e., flower heads) look very much like Centaurea X moncktonii, a hybrid between brown knapweed and black knapweed. This is a common hybrid in New England. The leaves are a little problematic, however, as this species usually does not have blades with the degree of lobing shown in your images (at least in my experience). Puzzling plants.
  • Question
    This plant is growing in a very shaded area in my backyard. It started off with small white flowers and grew into this. The root of the plant is an orange color and when the root is broken it oozes an orange ink. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear jsnay80, the plant in your images is Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot). It is a spring-flowering member of the Papaveraceae (poppy family). The orange color you notice from the rhizome is latex, which makes the sap thick and colored.
  • Question
    This white parsley grows profusely on the side of my dirt road in Harrisville, NH. It likes the ditch, a moist place, where it reaches 2-3 feet. Not massive like cow parsnip or angelica, it closely resembles Golden Alexanders. The flowers are born on 3 stalks at the top. Two 3-part leaves grow from the stem where those 3 stalks diverge. The lower leaves are doubly compound. My best guess: Honeywort (Cryptotaenia canadensis).
    Answer
    DavidBlair, good morning. Your plant most likely is Aegopodium podagraria (bishop's gout-weed). It is a commonly planted member of the Apiaceae that frequently escapes and forms dense colonies by rhizomatous growth. Some colonies have variegated leaves, others have uniformly green leaves.
  • Question
    this is pretty flower growing stone mountain park.GA. vine, look like climbing plants would you give me the name? thank you
    Answer
    Dear liku, your plant is likely Matelea carolinensis (Carolina milkvine). It is a vining member of the Apocynaceae (dogbane family) native to the southeastern United States.
  • Question
    I'll like to know this flower name took in stone mountain park, GA
    Answer
    Dear liku, your plant is Linaria canadensis (oldfield toadflax). It is often referenced in various plant guides under the scientific name Nuttallanthus canadensis. It is a non-native member of our flora that is found in disturbed and early successional habitats. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this plant appeared in one of our flower gardens this year in Andover, NH. Is it spotted knapweed? If not, please ID it. Thanks. Marinar
    Answer
    Dear Marinar, your image is of a species of knapweed (genus Centaurea), a member of the aster family. However, I cannot tell you which species without additional images of the bracts that surround the base of the flower head (I cannot see them clearly in the image and they are crucial for identification). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Not sure if my email went through, looking to find the name of these two tall plants with exotic smelling flowers growing in my garden in Massachusetts. They are very tall. Picture is upside down.
    Answer
    Dear Suewho, Your two tall plants in the image are Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed). These are native plants with fragrant flowers. Enjoy!
  • Question
    Hello, I have this plant growing all over my property. I've tried using your plant key but I don't see it. It appears to be very invasive and quick growing! I would love to know what it is. Thanks in advance!
    Answer
    Dear Damselfly, there are no images associated with your post. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Be sure to include information on the location of these plants (general part of the world they are growing in). Best wishes.
  • Question
    These perennial, woodyish plant we inherited with our house. Growing in the flower garden but rapidly overtakes. 3-4.5 feet high. Seems to spread easily, perhaps by rhizome. North Yarmouth Me Thanks Alex
    Answer
    Dear AlexNY, your plant looks like a cultivated version of Rudbeckia laciniata(green-headed coneflower). This species, while native to New England is also occasionally cultivated. If you examine images of the leaves of this species on the web, you will note the resemblance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have this plant taking over a corner of my vegetable and herb garden. Can you tell me what it is? I'm located on the south coast of British Columbia.
    Answer
    Dear primetime, I do not know for certain what your plant is, but it does resemble some members of the genus Helianthus (sunflower), and some species do grow aggressively. If you will be allowing some of these to flower, please send more images (posting them here or use my email address: ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org) and I can give you a more informed answer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Location: Teaching Herb Garden at Elm Bank in Wellesley, MA. This is in the Native American bed. Pictures taken in early June. Liza Green suggested it could be Penstemfon pallidus but it also may be a "dropping" from the birds.
    Answer
    Dear astoma, good afternoon. The images you've posted are a species of Penstemon (beardtongue). However, I would not be able to identify it based on the images provided. Identification would rely on details of the flowers (including measurements of length), the shape of the sepals, a side-view of the flowers, and information about the hairs on the leaves. Feel free to continue this conversation at "ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org" if you would like.
  • Question
    This is a photo of a plant with very distinct leaves and the beginning of a white flower, but I have not been able to identify it with the Go Botany key. It was taken perhaps a month or so ago in Vermont. Can you help me by identifying it? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your plant is Nepeta cataria (catnip), a non-native member of the Lamiaceae (mint family). This species is naturalized here and there in New England. The odor of the bruised leaves is a very useful character for identification (if you get an opportunity to visit this plant again).
  • Question
    This is the last of the photos I took about a month ago in Vermont which I have been unable to identify. Many thanks.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your plant is a species of Cardamine (bitter-cress), a member of the mustard family. It looks most like Cardamine pensylvanica (Pennsylvania bitter-cress), though I would need to have some additional details before I could supply a confident answer. This species is frequent in wet forests, along streams and other shorelines, and other wetland locations in New England.
  • Question
    Can you please identify what is this plant name and classification?
    Answer
    Dear SaraQA, thank you for the images, but I don't know where this plant was photographed. There are nearly 500,000 species of plants on earth and without knowing the location they originate it is extremely difficult to provide answers. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (i.e., northeastern United States). Therefore, plants from other regions of the world may not be well known to us. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I thought this was Osmunda regalis, but now I am less sure. I see what look like spore-bearing structures on the leaflet margin, but would that make it O. claytoniana (interrupted fern) rather than O. regalis? Perhaps it is a young plant, or a hybrid?
    Answer
    Dear suecar, your plant is most likely Osmunda regalis. Occasionally, sporangia appear to unusual locations on these plants (for a variety of reasons). The hybrid between these two plants is very rare (only two confirmed collections in the world).
  • Question
    Please identify this tree/bush. Located in Bolton, Ct in a wooded area.
    Answer
    Dear kemerick, your plant is a species of Ligustrum (privet), a member of the olive family. These non-native shrubs are frequently planted and naturalized in New England. The species is the image is likely Ligustrum obtusifolium (border privet).
  • Question
    Can you tell me what these are? I was given these seeds by a winter sown site and were packaged as Sunray tomatoes which is not likely. :-)
    Answer
    Dear DougPunchak, good morning. Your plant is Raphanus raphanistrum (wild radish), a member of the same genus that cultivated radish hails from (both of which belong to the mustard family).
  • Question
    What are the plants with the long tubular stem and what looks similar to a purple bulb at the top with shoots coming out of it? They are at the edge of some woods in Boston and are about two feet tall
    Answer
    Dear Reptiman202, your plant is a species of Allium, most likely Allium vineale (crow garlic). The flowers in this species are often largely (or even entirely) replaced by bulblets, as you have photographed.
  • Question
    I came across a population of this tree in Dedham, MA. I think Quercus, but species has me stumped. I though maybe Q. prinoides (rhizomatous colony) but these trees are in a very wet area (standing water, sphagnum moss). Also, pointed leaf tips seem different. I ruled out Q. rubra based on bark and base of leaf blade. I ruled out Q. bicolor because underside of leaf is nearly hairless (only few hairs visible w/ hand lens). Pics of leaf tops & bottoms, bark, population/location & leaf cover. Tx!
    Answer
    Dear stephradner, your tree is Nyssa sylvatica (black tupelo), a member of the Cornaceae. The bark is characteristic of this species, as well the leaf blades, which occasionally have a few, remote teeth on the leaves. This tree is found in swamps, such as you have pictured in the nice series of photographs.
  • Question
    Not sure if I planted this or whether it is wild. It is growing in front of my house in Manchester, MA. Flower is about 3" long, leaves are 4" long when mature. Plant has multiple stems coming out of the ground and is about 3-4ft tall. Any ideas what it is?
    Answer
    Dear seejayuu, I do not recognize this plant--which suggests it may be cultivated. If possible, can you send some additional images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org , that provide me an opportunity to share the images with other people who might recognize this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    found in open hay field, in spring dark red hue, no crown , roots look tuberous
    Answer
    Dear joelnehodahops, I see you were able to upload images (which is great). Your plant appears to be Botrychium multifidum (leathery grapefern), a member of the Ophioglossaceae. This is an infrequent member of clearings and open fields.
  • Question
    Trying to identify,not a fern, /found in open hay field, in spring dark red hue, no crown , roots look tuberous
    Answer
    Dear joelnehodahops, there is no image associated with your post. While I could speculate on the species you have seen, I would need an image to provide you a confident answer. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org .
  • Question
    I recently tried a "new", at least for me, way of planting seed potatoes. I used a posthole digger in a Deep Bed Garden to plant the seeds 15" deep in the soft soil of the deep bed. Since it is a new technique i had never heard of, i was skeptical that the seedlings would find their way to the surface before using up all the energy stored in the tuber. However, to my delight, they have all surfaced and are growing strongly. My question is, How did the potato plants "KNOW" to grow UP?
    Answer
    Dear skipwillis82, the embryo in a plant seed is negatively gravitropic, meaning it grows away from the pull of gravity. That way, regardless of the depth and orientation of the seed, the seedling always grows upward toward the light of day. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found a few of these plants growing in a patch of hay scented fern in Southwestern Vermont. Can you identify them for me? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your plant is a species of Ribes (gooseberry, currant), a member of the Grossulariaceae. Without flowers or fruits, I would have a difficult time telling you which species without a specimen in hand. Perhaps knowing the genus will give you enough information to research this shrub on your own.
  • Question
    I took this photo of what appears to be a small bush or tree growing near a wooded stream bank in Southwestern Vermont earlier in the Spring. Can you help me identify it? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your plant appears to be a partially eaten Urtica species (stinging-nettle). Without close-up details, I cannot tell you which species. If you examine the plant closely, you will notice stinging hairs (stiff, translucent hairs with a bulbous base). Best wishes.
  • Question
    what is this plant and how do I care for it or find information on it?
    Answer
    Dear Glasshurricane, in order to care for it best you would need to identify what species it is (which would allow researching its needs). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. You would want to direct your question to a website that focuses on cultivated house plants. Good luck with your research.
  • Question
    Primula Mistassinica? Or Laurentiana? Lower Waterford, VT near Connecticut River
    Answer
    Dear Barbartalcott, I'm sorry, I simply can't tell you because the primary differences between these two species are the size of various organs. Here is the key from Flora Novae Angliae that will allow you to measure parts of this plant and determine for yourself. 3a. Sepals 3–6 mm long; scape 3–21 cm tall; largest leaf blades 10–40 (–60) mm long; bracts of umbel 3–6 mm long, barely (if at all) saccate at the base; capsules 2–3 mm in diameter; seeds rounded, their surface nearly smooth; flowers heterostylous . . . . .. . P. mistassinica 3b. Sepals 6–9 mm long; scape 10–40 cm tall; largest leaf blades 40–80 mm long; bracts of umbel 6–14 mm long, definitely saccate at the base; capsules 2.5–5 mm in diameter; seeds angled, their surface evidently reticulate; flowers homostylous . . . . . P. laurentiana
  • Question
    I apologize ahead of time as this is not a New England sighting, it is a Florida sighting, but can find no help here in identifying this prolific and annoying plant. It has long thin beans, tiny white blooms, five clover like leaves. When pulled from the ground it has a distinct, pungent odor. It is similar to the sickle pod Senna, Black Medic and several other invasive species in Florida, but I can not find this plant anywhere online; the mottling on leaves is herbicide burn.
    Answer
    Dear Carol1967, we are happy to entertain all plant questions, though with this one, the images are very washed out and I can't see details well enough to offer you any kind of answer. You might want to contact folks at Florida State University (email: herbarium@bio.fsu.edu) who could direct you to someone who would have an answer for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is a potted plant that grows in northern michigan. It loves it outside in the summer and is brought in for winter and put over a heat vent. It is non flowering. What is it and can it be propogated and how? Thank you
    Answer
    Dear browneyes5158, your plant is a member of the arum family (Araceae), the exact species I cannot determine for you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. While we are happy to entertain all plant questions, some regarding cultivated species may not be answerable without more information. You might wish to contact a horticulture department or a program that specifically deal with house plants. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Rubus chamaemorus carpellate flowers in coastal Washington County, Maine. What are the small structures around the base of the immature aggregate fruit?
    Answer
    Thokozile, the structures are asking about are stamens. I'm guessing that you are wondering why stamens would also be present in the flower of this species (a species with unisexual flowers), but they are usually present in the carpellate flowers. However, they never appear to be functional stamens in my experience with this plant (i.e., they are small and I've yet to see them dehisce and shed pollen). There are many examples of flowers that are "functionally unisexual" because they contain both stamens and carpels, but one of these series of parts is sterile. I hope this helps.
  • Question
    no question, yet.... Just wanted to say - you and your site are AWESOME.
    Answer
    Woodlandone, thank you for your kind words--we are happy you are enjoying the site. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Recently bought this succulent and cannot find any identification. Any idea of what it is?
    Answer
    Dear rsimons, your plant may be Austrocylindropuntia subulata (Eve's needle cactus), a species that has gone by many other scientific names (including Opuntia subulata and Pereskia subulata). Most of the species found in this genus are native to South America. Best wishes.
  • Question
    just submitted 4 photos of a vining habit plant- failed to mention location- central VT Thanks
    Answer
    Thank you becky, the location information is extremely helpful. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Looking for an id on a plant that grows in my town in a variety of locations- mixed New England forest to field edge. Vining habit which seems more sturdy in sunnier locations. I tried keying it out but must be getting some fact wrong. I've included some photos of leaves and flowers. The image of the flowering bodies needs to be rotated to be in the correct orientation. Thanks so much for your help.
    Answer
    Dear Becky, your plant is Smilax herbacea (carrion-flower), an herbaceous species in the same genus as cat briars. These are monocot vines and lianas (the woody members are armed with prickles, the herbaceous species are unarmed).
  • Question
    I have these plants in my front lawn (in Los Angeles). I don't know if it's a weed or some kind of plant. Can you help me identify? I have two plants. I believe them to be the same, but I can't be sure. Thank you very much!
    Answer
    Dear Djokluv, good morning. Los Angelese is a long way away from New England, but I do believe I can help with the first plant you posted (it has narrow white margins on the upper leaves). This looks like Euphorbia marginata (mountain snow spurge), a member of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge family). The second plant I am unable to help with--but if it flowers, please post another image and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    I'm thinking this may be Potentilla Erecta, though your key doesn't include photos of the flower. Found on Woodsom Farm, Amesbury, a grassland area.
    Answer
    Chaffeemonell, the images you have posted are of Potentilla recta (sulphur cinquefoil). This is a common, non-native species of fields and roadsides that originated from Europe. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, from Miami, Fla. My question, while repotting my Curcuma. I noticed these potato like root balls attached to the bottom of the Curcuma root. Is that normal or should I remove them. They weren't there when planted. The original root is like a ginger root, not sure if those are good or bad. Thank you for your time. Alex.
    Answer
    Dear cool12, species of Curcuma produced tubers on the roots, and some species produce spherical tubers just like in your photograph. These are normal and don't need to be removed. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is an 8-10' hedge shrub next to some honeysuckle that has been growing for years in the shade among old-time plantings in the yard of my house in Newcastle, ME. It has just started flowering. Leaves are opposite and entire, and the flower is irregular. I have not had luck figuring out the species using GoBotany tools. Can you identify it? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Whitepine, the shrub is Kolkwitzia amabilis (beautybush), a species in the Caprifoliaceae (honeysuckle family). The flowers with five corolla lobes, but only four stamens, and bristly ovaries are useful identification features. Thank you for posting.
  • Question
    On June 7 I encountered this painted trillium (Trillium undulatum) in mixed hardwood/spruce/fir forest at about 2100 feet in the White Mountain National Forest. It's interesting because it has 4 leaves, 4 sepals, and 4 petals, although one petal was not fully developed, or had atrophied, and is not visible in the photo. How frequently do such aberrant forms occur in this species?
    Answer
    Dear restoretpoint, four-leaved and four-petaled individuals of Trillium are not common. Every now and again one is encountered in the forests of New England. These plants are considered to be the "developmental errors" as a result of injury to the growing apex of the plant that season. Typically, when re-visited or grown in a garden setting, those plants will revert to the usual 3-leaved and 3-petaled form the following season. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, This plant popped up in my Herb Garden. I can not identify it. I would appreciate some help. Thanks Cornish, Maine York County
    Answer
    Deaer Flubadub, your plant is a cultivated species of Aquilegia (columbine), a member of the Ranunculaceae (crowfoot family). I do not know the exact species of this plant (as cultivated species can hail from all over the world), but some hybrids with Aquilegia flavescens and A. chrysantha show this color pattern you have photographed. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I planted a few seeds a while back and have no idea what this plant is? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear jbean92, sorry, I'm unable to help. If the plant produces flowers and you wish to submit another image, that would be useful. We are happy to entertain all questions about plants, but Go Botany is dedicated to wild plants of New England; therefore, some cultivated species are difficult to identify because they originate from all over the world. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm confused about the difference between bleeding heart and dutchman's breeches. I always thought that the garden variety (bleeding heart) was a cultivated version of the wildflower that I am familiar with (dutchman's breeches). Now I come to learn that the garden variety came from Asia, and was recently given a new taxonomic classification (genus lamprocapnos instead of dicentra). How (if at all) are the two related? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear jj5406, great question. While Dicentra and Lamprocapnos are clearly related to each other, as evidenced by the similarity in the their overall flower structure and leaf form, they have many differences. For example, Dicentra (Dutchman's-breeches) emerges from a series of scaly bulbs, while Lamprocapnos (bleeding-heart) has a rhizome (underground, horizontal stem). Dicentra has all basal leaves, Lamprocapnos has a leafy stem. Dicentra has petals all similar colored, the inner ones of Lamprocapnos are of a different color (except in white-flowered forms). Hopefully this gives you some items to understand the differences between these two genera. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I don't know what this is it is growing in my garden and in my dirt pile in Florida
    Answer
    Dear Kenbotant, your plant looks like Ricinus communis (castor-bean), a member of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge family). The palmately lobed leaves with the petiole attached near the center of the leaf blade (rather than at the base near one margin) are identifying characteristics for this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, does anyone know what plant this is? I found it in my garden in southeastern MA. It has many prickles on the stem and on the undersides of leaves, following the main veins. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Buzzytop, I am unable to determine the plant in the image with confidence, but can provide some direction. The prickles you mention on the leaves and stems suggest Lactuca serriola (prickly lettuce). The prickles would be in a row along the midrib on the lower surface of the leaf (lined up like the bristles of a comb). Feel free to discuss further or send additional images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org .
  • Question
    Hello there , i would appreciate it so much if u could help me identify this plant , it grows in my region but i don't really now anything about it. Thank you for your contribution
    Answer
    Dear darwin123, your plant is a species of Euphorbia (spurge), a member of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge family). I can't tell you which species without knowing where your region is and photographs that clearly show the leaves (i.e., an image separate plants growing in the field). However, I'm hoping this answer will get you started in your study.
  • Question
    hi does anyone know what plant is this? thanks in advance!
    Answer
    Dear ajadeiwin, good morning. What an interesting looking plant. I do not know what species this is. Based on the image, it appears to be a cultivated species. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern United States). We are happy to entertain all questions, but plants from outside of this range may not be known to us. If you share the location, I can help you find people who may be able to assist with your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you identify this plant for me? Caryophyllaceae was the closest I got with the Dichotomous Key but I did not find a genus or species that fit well. It was prostrate, growing in disturbed sandy soil along with Scleranthus annuus. Location is near Quonochontaug Breachway in Charlestown, RI. I would guess it is non-native? Flowers are about 3mm across. Calyx is glandular. Leaves are succulent, round in cross-section, with sharp tips.
    Answer
    Dear suecar, your plant is indeed in the Caryophyllaceae. It is Spergularia rubra (red sand-spurry), a non-native species frequently found in dry, sandy, and often human-disturbed habitats. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. I just bought a house and found something that looked like a small serrated version of hen and chick. What is it? I found them under dying daffodil fronds in An area that had bushes until the seller upped the curb appeal. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear daisylizard, thank you for your post. Unfortunately, the images are not clear enough to allow me a good view of the plant you are interested in having identified. If you are able to take better images, feel free to send them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is not a question about a specific plant,but a botany question. I hope that's okay. Here is the question. I was looking at an apple,and started thinking. If the fruit's peel is what develops from the wall of the gynoecium,are the the cells on the very surface of the peel somatic and therefore diploid? Thank you.
    Answer
    dear pkbeep, in this case (with the apple), the fruits peel is not derived from the ovary, rather from the hypanthium of the flower. But in any case, the tissue of the fruits (save for the egg, sperm, and endosperm) are typically somatic and diploid (i.e., 2n). The gametes are 1n, and the endosperm is 3n, the remaining tissue is 2n. I hope this helps. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Japanese maple,.very old. Lace leaf,.umbrella style. I just used a lawn liquid fertilizer on the maple leaves,.maybe 20 seconds worth but the leaves seem are reacting to the nitrogen,.what can I do,.did go out and rewater {twice} the leaves.
    Answer
    samrienbolt, from your message it appears to added the fertilizer directly to the leaves? I'm not sure your reasoning for this. If you want to discuss further, please send a message to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and we can create a plan for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    anyway, it had a red, ball like flower with lots of petals sticking out. It had leaves with three of them stuck together. Do you know it?
    Answer
    muazzubair12, no, I don't know the plant from the description you've provided, but you can email images to the address that I supplied to you in another question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    sorry but the pics took a ling time to upload. Do you have an email.
    Answer
    Dear muazzubair12, you can send any pictures you can't upload to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org . Be sure to describe the location and habitat your plant was seen in.
  • Question
    I'm thinking this Bedstraw is Gallium album or mollugo. Looks to me more like album, which is not reported for Newburyport area. Found on the Joppa Flats Education Center grounds. Are these photos good enough to differentiate, or is it another species altogether?
    Answer
    Dear chafeemonell, your plant looks like Galium album or G. mollugo. From an image it is very difficult to tell these two species apart. The best way to determine this is to press some of the flowers flat and, once dried, measure the diameter of the flowers. Those of Galium album are usually 3--5 mm in diameter, those of Galium mollugo are usually 2--3 mm in diameter. They only need a couple of days to dry in a press or book, etc. Good luck.
  • Question
    Is this Viola sagitatta or V. fimbriatula? Its downy and I'm confused if these are two distinct species (as listed in Newcomb's Guide) or variations of the same. I found it in dry woods in Yorktown, NY. It was blooming in early May.
    Answer
    Dear missyfabel, this plant is Viola sagittata var. ovata (synonym: Viola fimbriatula). The short petioles (relative to the leaf blade length), abundant hairs on the leaf blades, and toothed leaf bases (rather than small lobes) all point to this variety.
  • Question
    This plant grows in the woods at Ledge Pond, NH. Last year I got to see it in bloom (early August) and still couldn't clearly identify it. Is it indeed Epipactis helleborine? I am a native plant enthusiast so should I remove it is so? It does not appear to be spreading.
    Answer
    Dear missyfabel, yes, your plant is Epipactis helleborine (helleborine orchid). While non-native, it is not invasive and may be used by native pollinators. This orchid has become more common in New England in the recent decades, but it does not crowd out other vegetation.
  • Question
    I saw this at Turkey Mountain in Yorktown, NY. Looks like rattlesnake plantain, but veination coloring is throwing me off. Any ideas? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear missyfabel, your plant in the photograph is Hieracium venosum (rattlesnake hawkweed). This is not an orchid, but rather a member of the Asteraceae (aster family). It has a white latex when the leaf is bruised, much like common dandelion. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have an abundance of white violets that are thriving in a wet part of my yard (over the cess pool), which I think are a white form of Viola sororia. Last year I discovered a speckled violet that Carol Gracie told me was a cultivated form of Viola sororia 'Freckles.' Does a white form of Viola sororia exist and if so, is it V. sororia 'alba'? They appear to self sow more than spread by runners. This year I have several more speckled ones. Photos included. I live in Chappaqua, NY.
    Answer
    Dear missyfabel, thank you for your nice images. With violets, I would need specimens or a series of detailed images that displayed details of the sepals, their cilia, petal hairs, leaf pubescence, etc. in order to identify these for you. I have seen Viola cucullata (marsh violet) with the spotted color of one of your photographs. From what I can discern of this image, it does not appear to be Viola sororia (the sepal morphology looks incorrect). Every white-flowered violet I've seen similar to Viola sororia was actually a hybrid with Viola cucullata (though I don't know for sure with your image). Hopefully this is some help for you. Feel free to discuss further and/or send additional images to ahaines[at]newenglandwildorg. Best wishes.
  • Question
    While walking through the Oxbow National Wildlife Refuge I spotted a young tree that I could immediately identify as Populus. My first leaning was to P. grandidentata, but upon closer inspection of all of the leaves I began to wonder if this might be a hybrid. Could you offer your opinion on the likelihood of this being a hybrid versus displaying the expected morphological plasticity of bigtooth aspen? I've attached photos of all of the leaves. Thanks in advance!
    Answer
    Dear a_blooming_botanist, one of the trouble's that you will run into with the genus Populus (poplars, aspens) is that when the stems are cut the sprouts that emerge will have anomalous leaves. The reason is the root system is still intact and can supply more water and nutrition than the few sprouting leaves would normally have access to. As a result, these leaves are not constrained by size and surface area (normally, leaves maintain a certain size to prevent too much water loss). In the end, these leaves end up being very anomalous and are difficult to use for identification. Therefore, you have to rely on other characteristics such as branchlet pubescence and winter bud characters. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I am Muaz. My father recently went to Edinburgh and saw this flower plant growing beside his guest house. I love this flower so I want to know what it is called so I that I can buy it. Please reply ASAP.
    Answer
    Dear muazzubair12, there are no images attached to your message; therefore, I cannot help you with your request. Please post an image or send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org so that I can attempt to help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! This small interesting plant grows in both sun and shade in our Shrewsbury MA yard. The last few years, we had only 2-3 grow in the backyard wild area. This year, they cropped up in our front yard grass...can you tell me what it is? It does not have a remarkable flower on top, just a small strand of little buds that droop. Thanks, cathyvshaw
    Answer
    Dear kevinfayshaw, I can't tell for certain from your image because the plant has been cropped short and this has taken away some of the details of the plant I need. It could be Epipactis helleborine (helleborine orchid), a non-native orchid that is relatively common in New England and does have flower buds that droop (they become upright as they open). If you want to send additional images, feel free to use this email: ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org .
  • Question
    In both Trustom (South Kingstown, RI) & Ninigret (Charlestown, RI) NWR, there are 2 types flowering shrubs (very very commonly seen in both refuges) that I need ID help with. I'm attaching some photos, so hopefully that will help. I believe one type to be one or more honeysuckle varieties. It is seen in white/yellow flowers & in pink. The other I'm not sure about. It is seen in both regular & variegated leaves and the flowers are either all white or white/yellow. Diane
    Answer
    Dear DianeD1946, the honeysuckle that you noted is (in most of the images) Lonicera morrowii (morrow's honeysuckle). This is an invasive species that has originated from Asia. The other species is Elaeagnus umbellata (autumn-olive), another species originating from the Old World. Both of the species are common in southern New England. Bes wishes.
  • Question
    Saw what I think is a short, yellow-flowered mint on the lower Ridge Trail at GITW. For a picture, see website www.eddiewren.com entry "NEWFS, 24 May, 2015", fourth picture (copyrighted). I think we may call Eddie a friend of GITW. A capable, knowledgable, and friendly photographer.
    Answer
    Dear DaveTholl, the plant you have photographed is Lamium galeobdolon (yellow henbit). It is a non-native species that originated from Europe. It is a popular garden plant in the northeast, but does occasionally spread and (in a few instances) is invasive in natural communities. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Plant is located on a pond shore in Arlington, MA. I've been told that it is rusty willow, salix atrocinerea. Is that correct? From what I could find out about rusty willow, it would normally bloom in the early spring, before it leafs out, but this plant is blooming now (late May). Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear versicolor, thank you for the images. I would need additional photographs to help you with a confident identification. I'm unable to see the underside of any leaves, where crucial information is located that helps with species determination. I can tell you if these two images are from the same individual, you willow is not Salix cinerea ssp. oleifolia (synonym: Salix atrocinerea). If you want to send additional images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I would be happy to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I am having trouble with a particular weed. It grows tall, some are 6-8 feet in height. They are thorny and fast growing. I think they are a rhizome because the roots grow horizontally and lead to new plants. The flower is on top of the plant and is white and yellow. Found along edge of woods in southern Delaware
    Answer
    Dear JasonParsley, you are welcome to email images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org if you are having trouble uploading them here on Go Botany.
  • Question
    1. tall (3-5 feet) stemmed plant with a small white flower later in the season at its tip. opposite leaves (oval) popping up everywhere. native or invasive? Sorry for the sideways pics. 2. And can you identify the plant w the blue flowers) . Native? Thank you! Western Ma
    Answer
    Dear renlibrarian, I can help with the two plants you have posted images of. The first two images are of a species of Apocynum (dogbane). There are two species (and their hybrid) in the northeast. I if you can post images of the flowers later in the season, I can help you with the identification at that time. The blue flower is Pulmonaria saccharta (lungwort), a member of the Boraginaceae (borage family) native to Europe. Beautiful image.
  • Question
    I'm afraid this plant which is growing on the banks of a nearby stream in southwestern Vermont is narrowleaf bittercress (Cardamine impatiens). Am I correct? Thank you so much for your help.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, I believe your hypothesis is correct. While I can't see certain features that would allow me to confirm this identification for you, the leaflets outline and plant habit do indeed look like Cardamine impatiens (narrow-leaved bittercress). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have been unable to identify this plant which has been growing for about three years now near my compost piles here in southwestern Vermont. It has very distinct shaped leaves and never seems to flower. Is it a weed of some sort or perhaps something that got there from seeds in the compost pile (edible?). Your help is much appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, your plant is Lapsana communis (common nipplewort), a non-native member of the Asteraceae (aster family). The basal leaves (which you have photographed) are very different in morphology from the stem leaves. I you examine some web images of this species, you gain a familiarity with the leaf blade outlines of this species. This species is a well known edible with slightly bitter foliage.
  • Question
    Have these vine like weeds growing all over my backyard along the house. tried googling "fuzzy green fruit" to no avail. thanks in advance.
    Answer
    Dear Panic.exe, while I can't be sure of the species of plant you are photographing, the spherical objects are galls, and are the result of an insect larva that is inside the leaf tissue. Each gall is a response to the insect by the plant. In many cases, if you open up a young gall, you can find the larva on the interior. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have found these plants in the woods of southeastern Connecticut. I cant seem to find a picture match on the internet. Could you please identify it? Thanks, Nancy
    Answer
    Dear Nancy, your plant is likely Pyrola Americana (American shinleaf), an herbaceous member of the Ericaceae (heath family). Occasionally, this species has lighter colored veins on a darker background. Here is another example of this kind of coloration in this species: http://newfs.s3.amazonaws.com/taxon-images-1000s1000/Ericaceae/pyrola-americana-le-bpatterson-b.jpg . Best wishes.
  • Question
    I had asked the ID of this plant earlier but only sent a pic of the leaf. Which wasn't helpful in the identification. The Botanist needed a pic of the full plant. So here it is! I don't know if it is visible by the pic, but it is growing on the edge of a strip of scrub woods. Near a whole bunch of wild raspberry briers. If that helps. Funny thing I noticed is that across from that pic there is another strip of woods and similar plants are growing in a row. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear BJamesG, thank you for posting another image of your plant. This helps and provides a generic name: Rumex (dock). This is a plant in the Polygonaceae (knotweed family). This is a group of 18 species (just in New England) and fruits are necessary (for most species) to identify them. Hopefully knowing the genus will help get you started in your research. Best wishes.
  • Question
    good morning, I live in Seaford NY (long island) near the water. I recetnly moved in and had this plant removed, it was growing all over the place. I then put in in white birch and some leyland cypress, but this plant is back!! Can you please tell me what it is, thanks so much for the help.
    Answer
    Dear dmels28, Your plant is in the genus Fallopia (knotweed). It is most likely Fallopia japonica (Japanese knotweed; synonym: Polygonum cuspidatum), but there is also a hybrid in this genus that looks very similar. This robust and aggressive herb is native to Asia. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in southwestern Pennsylvania and this started growing in the front yard. I haven't been able to identify it and I don't want to kill it if it's a shrub. I have very poor soil that grows a lot of weeds so I'm wondering if this is another weed. It has a nice thick stalk like a shrub.
    Answer
    Dear ebradich, your plant in the photographs looks like a seedling of Morus alba (white mulberry). This is a well known fruit tree. If it is in a good location, you might decide to keep it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found this mystery mustard (?) growing on a sandy barrier island in NJ back in late April. The leaves appeared rubbery similar to other 'seaside' plants. Any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear michaelcobballen, I'm sorry that I do not recognize this plant. You are certainly correct with the family (Brassicaceae), but it does not appear as anything I've encountered from north of you in New England. If you do get the opportunity to view the plant in fruit and get images, please post them. The fruits are extremely important for identification and will give us more clues as to this plant's identity. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I live in Montevideo, Uruguay and the other day we found this plant. Could you tell me which plant is? Thnk you very much
    Answer
    Dear Eugenia, beautiful image. Unfortunately, I can't help you with confidence. The flowers look remarkably like the genus Trichostema (blue curls), a member of the Lamiaceae (mint family). However, the fruits that are developing do not look correct for this genus. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. We are happy to entertain all plant questions, but some regions of the world are outside of our expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you please identify this flower, it was photographed at Glendurgan Garden (National Trust Cornwall). It was growing in a woodland area and on open areas with bluebells. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear jdp, your plant may be Clintonia umbellulata (white blue-bead-lily). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. Though we have some familiarity with plants in other parts of the world, our expertise is the aforementioned region. Hopefully this suggestion will give you a place to begin your study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! I found this growing in my garden in Brasov, Romania. I don't know what it is. Is it a flower by any chance? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear liliana, I'm sorry that I cannot help. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. There are folks in Europe who could help you with this identification. If you need assistance finding and contacting them, let me know and I can assist. You can contact me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org.
  • Question
    Hello! This small shrub is growing in one of my perennial beds in Lancaster, MA (central MA). It may have been planted by the previous owners, or it may have volunteered. The flowers are on the undersides of the leaves. It is flowering right now. Can you help me identify it? Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear anneogilvie, the shrub is Elaeagnus umbellata (autumn-olive), a member of the Elaeagnaceae. This is a non-native species that originated in the Old World and is not found throughout much of New England, especially in areas where humans have disturbed the landscape. It produces aromatic flowers and an edible, red fruit. It is invasive in some locations, so you may choose to remove it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found growing on rock at about 1900 feet in elevation. The area is said to be serpentine rock in the town of Windham, VT. I found one small colony of the plant. The image I will upload is geotagged
    Answer
    Dear Frank, your plant is a species of maidenhair spleenwort (genus Asplenium). It is either Asplenium trichomanes (diploid maidenhair spleenwort) or Asplenium quadrivalens (tetraploid maidenhair spleenwort). Separating these two species is very difficult without specimens and magnification (though sometimes substrate is quite accurate). Asplenium trichomanes is usually found on non-calcareous rock (i.e., acidic), while Asplenium quadrivalens is usually found on calcareous rock (i.e., circumneutral to basic). I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Can you help identify this plant? Found in wooded area near driveway. Trying to locate poison ivy and wasn't sure what type of plant is shown in the attached picture....
    Answer
    Dear Joe, the dark-leaved plant is Rubus hispidus (bristly blackberry). The other plants I cannot tell until they develop more. None of these plants are species of Toxicodendron (poison-ivy).
  • Question
    Plant in question is the one in the center of the pictures with the reddish green leaves. These were found next to a driveway. There are some larges plants with similar leaves and woody stems. Just looking for some help identifying. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Joe, the plant in the center of the images is a species of Toxicodendron (poison-ivy). I cannot tell you which species it is without seeing mature plants. Toxicodendron radicans (poison-ivy) is a woody, climbing species that ascends other vegetation by means of aerial roots. Toxicodendron rydbergii (western poison-ivy) is a straggling shrub without aerial roots. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This woody shrub is growing in the shady edge of the property and flowers each May. We've been unable to ID it as a native species. There are 4 petals on the white flowers. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear kaspesla, your plant is Rhodotypos scandens (black jetbead). It is a plant native to the Old World that belongs to the Rosaceae (rose family).
  • Question
    weird leaf of a plant I found I believe it is a type of maple
    Answer
    Dear ArrowBoucher, while I do not know exactly what has afflicted the leaf, it looks that it could possibly be a gall or rust fungus. While there are many things can cause discoloration of a leaf, these are two causes that can create red coloration on an early season leaf. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found this lone plant in backyard in New Jersey U.S. In a strip of woody brush between properties. It was a single plant. Tried looking everywhere and saw pics of the plant but were always in the background of a flower someone had taken a picture of. Just looking for an id of the plant. The image I included is one of 2 to 3 leaves on one stem of the plant. Leaves are pretty big and stand out from all the other wild brush and grasses.
    Answer
    Dear BJamesG, I'm sorry that I do not know the plant you have photographed (at least from the leaf). Your image was shared with other botanists who also were unsure of the identification. If possible, send later pictures to my email address (ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org) or post later pictures, especially if the plant flowers. I would much like to help you with your request, but will need more images to do so. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant is growing along the roads in Northern Virginia and is in full bloom. Generally less than five feet tall, Brilliant white blooms.
    Answer
    Dear taoncale, the plant looks like a species of Chionanthus (fringe-tree), a member of the Oleaceae (olive family). It is likely Chionanthus virginicus (white fringe-tree), which is native to the eastern and southern United States. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I just moved to Revere, MA this winter and finding some new plants as they break ground. If this helps, we live in Beachmont, MA, close to the salt water marsh and oceann. I would love help with identifying these plants. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear salsamari, the small, violet flowers belong to Glechoma hederacea (Gill-over-the-ground), a member of the Lamiaceae (mint family). The non-flowering plants appear to be a species of Hylotelephium (orpine), a member of the Crassulaceae (stonecrop family). Without flowers, I would not be able to tell you which species it is with confidence. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this on dry land along a river bank. The stems are round in cross-section and the leaves are about 4mm across at their widest. The plant had no flowers, and stood about 6 inches tall.
    Answer
    Dear shiggers, your photograph depicts a species of grass (Poaceae), but the species I cannot determine without flowers/fruits. If you want to go further with the identification, I would need a later photograph (better, several) of the plant with flowers or fruits and would need to know the location (generally) of the plant (i.e., what state). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This has been growing up from under my deck for several years. I always cut it back and it grows back vigorously. My deck is in a full sun location with poor clay soil and I am located in south central pennsylvania. It is a woody plant and appears shrub like or almost like a woody vine although it does not seem to cling or twine. Any idea what this is??
    Answer
    Dear Ironborn, the plant you have posted an image of is Solanum dulcamara (climbing nightshade), in the Solanaceae (nightshade family). It will produce bright red fruits later in the season if the flowers are allowed to mature.
  • Question
    Having trouble identifying this. Found in Bath, Maine.
    Answer
    Dear Joe, the plant you have photographed is Aralia nudicaulis (wild sarsaparilla). It is a member of the Apiaceae (celery family) that produces a single, compound leaf (which you have photographed) and (on some plants) produces a leafless flowering stalk in the spring.
  • Question
    I found this beautiful flower in my yard close to wetland. Resembles a Spath or Calla Lilly. Can you identify this photo. Dracut, MA
    Answer
    Dear Gail, the plant is Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-pulpit). It belongs to the same family as calla-lily (the arum family, Araceae). In this case, the spathe if striped and fluted, rather than plane and white. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Having trouble identifying this. Any idea?
    Answer
    Dear shiggers, the leaf you have photographed may be a leaf from a plant in the genus Arctium (burdock), as in Arctium minor (lesser burdock). These leaves are typically gray-hairy on the underside of the leaf (more so on early leaves than fully expanded leaves). Further, the veins will be very prominent on the lower surface. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Having trouble IDing this.
    Answer
    Dear shiggers, your plant looks like an early shoot of a goldenrod in the section Triplenervae, which includes species like Solidago canadensis (Canada goldenrod) and Solidago gigantea (smooth goldenrod). It would be easier to assist you if information concerning the general area this plant came from (i.e., state) and the habitat you found it in was also provided. Without this kind of information, plant identifications are sometimes difficult to provide. Hopefully this will get you started in your study of this plant.
  • Question
    Having trouble iding this! Found in bath, Maine
    Answer
    Dear Brearune, your plant looks to be a seedling of horse-chestnut (Aesculus hipposcastanum), a species in the soap-berry family (Sapidanceae) with opposite, palmately compound leaves. This tree is naturalized in Maine and occasionally is found in forest fragments, roadsides, or persisting from old plantings. There are other species in this genus, and identifying them confidently would require fully expanded leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have 3-4 of these trees in my yard. We just moved in and I have no idea what is growing in my yard. The flowers are falling of this week. Please Help. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear jsnay80, I'm sorry but the images you have posted are either too distant or (for the close-ups) not in focus. The tree is a member of the rose family (Rosaceae), but whether it is a pear (Pyrus), shadbush (Amelanchier), or another genus I'm unable to tell. Feel free to send additional images if you can acquire some. Best wishes.
  • Question
    So, this plant is a little sad looking because I had to move it. the root system (no picture) was very thick and traveled horizontally. Any idea. (Massachusetts)
    Answer
    Dear jsnay80, your plant looks like a species of Paeonia (peony) that is beginning to bud. It will be easier to confirm this identification after the plant flowers (feel free to post additional images or send images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org). Best wishes.
  • Question
    What kind of plant is this
    Answer
    Dear mrsdixon2007, your cultivated plant may be a species of jade (in the genus Crassula, the commonly cultivated species is Crassula ovata). The leaves do appear different than the usual form of this plant that is grown indoors (but hopefully this will give you a place to start your study to determine its identity). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. And while we are happy to entertain all plant questions, those outside of this topic area are not always answerable by us.
  • Question
    I'm trying to identify this plant for my grandmother she received it from my uncle that has since passed away.She thought it was a burning bush.I remember the plant with green leaves and a light flower maybe white or yellow she says it would turn red at some point during the year but I don't remember it doing so.it was replanted two years ago when she moved and hasn't bloomed since I'm trying to find a way to save it If that's possible. I would really appreciate any help! Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear AKovach13, the shrub you have photographed probably belongs to the genus Euonymus (spindle tree, which is the genus that burning bush belongs to). The opposite branching and four ridges on some branchlets suggest this identification. However, without leaves, flowers, or fruits, I would not be able to give you a confident answer as to which species this is. If you want to post images from later in the season (or send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org), I would be happy to try and help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in western mass. I found this plant growing near a river. And sorry for some reason with the 3rd picture it has a different plant for the thumbnail but when you click it it changes to the actual plant. Sorry I dont know why it does this. Sometimes it uploads multiple of one plant.
    Answer
    Dear OutdoorLife, you have photographed a species of Ribes (currant, gooseberry) in the Grossulariaceae. I can't tell you the exact species without additional photographs of the flowers and/or fruits. These shrubs have palmately lobed leaves (like maples) but they are alternate on the stem (not opposite, as in maples). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I would like to know what the name of this plant is before I buy it. It's located in Hempstead Long Island(New York)
    Answer
    Dear Dbuchanan, the plant you have photographed that has the deep magenta flowers in Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife). It is a non-native species that is aggressively invasive in wetlands. While it is quite beautiful, I would encourage you not to purchase this particular species. There are other plants that supply this color or an approximation of it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found this in Kenduskeag Maine. Gravel/soil, on a hillside. Was covered in thick leaves. Sunny in spring. But total shade throughout summer and fall. Not damp, for the most part. Surrounding plants are mostly birches and ash? I think. No ground cover plants to speak of.
    Answer
    Dear Jaredpaschal, the plant you have posted a picture of may be Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-pulpit). It is a very early shoot and if I could see this plant after the leaves begin to expand I would be able to help you with more confidence. If you have the opportunity to post a later image here or send one to ahaines@newenglandwild.org, feel free to do so. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I just posted my photos of what I believe to be a wild hydrangea aborescens on the 'recent sightings' area of this website. The photos are from last summer. I think I have a wild hydrangea growing along the border of our property. It's so full and pretty during the summer and I love how it fills out and flowers. I just want to confirm it is a hydrangea and to know it's type. I am also curious to know if it's invasive or is it a welcome plant in my yard. Any information is most appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear tmor4, the plant you have photographed is likely Swida alternifolia (alternate-leaved dogwood), a native shrub in New England. The fact the leaves are crowded near the apex and the blades borne of long petioles are identifying features of this plant. Notice that the leaf blades are entire (i.e., without teeth). If these were a species of Hydrangea, the leaf blades would have toothed margins. I wrote "likely" a few sentences ago because I do not know where these images were taken and there may be similar species in other parts of the world (i.e., outside of northeastern North America). Please always include the location of your images to help with the identification.
  • Question
    I live in western mass. Im wondering what this plant is. It smells sweet and almost fruity.
    Answer
    Dear OutdoorLife, the plant you have photographed appears to be a species of Hypericum (St. John's-wort). These species have simple, opposite, entire, and sessile leaves with translucent dots. I can't tell you what species it is from the photograph (there are 17 species in New England) with flowers or fruits. It may be Hypericum perforatum (common St. John's-wort). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi Aurthur, I am looking for the exact number of wild native plants in Maine, and the number of wild species (in other words, including naturalized. My Josselyn Bot Society publication seems dated, and I can not seem to find an up to date number. Do I need to manually go through the Maine listings on geobotany, or can you answer this? Thank you, Heather
    Answer
    Dear Heather, I don't have an exact number (without counting up all the species myself). I can tell you it is very close to 2100 species. Since the Flora of Maine, a couple of species have been excluded and a small number of have been added. Hopefully this number can be of use to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can anyone please tell me what this plant is? I was thinking it was a gladiolus but after looking through pictures of gladiolus' online I'm not sure. It is growing in my yard in south central Illinois. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear RainbowTurtleLuv, thank you for posting your image. Your plant may be a species of Iris (sometimes called flag). The flowers appear to be in bud and it would be much easier to identify this plant with an open flower. If you have the opportunity to post another image when it flowers, please do so in order that we can help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was recently given a branch from a plant or tree with bristles. The plant or tree was growing near a pond. I put the branch in water and noticed some changes in the branch that are nothing short of bizarre. A white fuzzy/cottony/downy material is growing near the bristles. Now for the super strange characteristic... The bristles move individually in worm like patterns. It's kind of creepy so I moved the branch outside until it can be identified.
    Answer
    Zzzmome, if you can post an image, I would try to help you identify the plant and/or the organisms. If you are having difficulty posting an image, you can send one to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org so that I may view them. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hoping someone can help me get some answers that I can't seem to find anyyyyywhere!!! Will lavender survive in a garden bed just beyond the reach of a black walnut tree? Looking to find out if lavender is juglone tolerant. I've googled and Google and find no solid answer. Any input would be much appreciated! Thank you in advance :-)
    Answer
    Dear emma1979, you've posed a very good question. Go Botany is a site dedicated to wild plants of New England. Your query regarding cultivation might better be directed to the horticulture folks at the New England Wild Flower Society, who can be contacted at nursery[at]newenglandwild.org. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I think this is a wildflower, but it is too early to tell what kind of flower it will get. Can you help identify it by the leaves. It is growing on the banks of a stream in Southwestern Vermont. Thank you.
    Answer
    Imc825, the plant you have photographed is Cardamine diphylla (two-leaved toothwort), a member of the Brassicaceae (mustard family). It is a common component of deciduous forests on rich, moist soils in New England.
  • Question
    Can you help me identify this plant, which is now emerging in abundance in the woods and side of my driveway in Southwestern Vermont? Right now it is about 2-1/2 feet tall.
    Answer
    Dear Imc825, this is Spiraea alba var. latifolia (white meadowsweet) leafing out. This shrub is a member of the Rosaceae (rose family). It will have white flowers later in the season (if it reproduces).
  • Question
    Hello ive found this plant and TONS of it. Ive been told that it is bedstraw or cleavers. But it isnt sticky like it says bedstraw is. Ive searched all the plants in the galium family and i cannot find it. It has a square stem and it has leaves that grow in groups of 7-8. And when you find it you find A LOT of it. The flowers havent come out yet.
    Answer
    Dear oiislove, good morning. Because I don't know where these images were taken, I can't offer too much help. Location is vitally important so that we can sort through the nearly 1/2 million species of plants found on this globe. Also, the images you've posted (for some reason) have a different thumbnail than when expanded and viewed larger. This plant may be a species of Galium (they don't have minute barbs that create a scratchy feel). If you want to email more information and images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I will be happy to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant has shiny leaves and some of them have reddish splotches on them. The stems are also reddish. They are growing in the shade of other trees in Southwestern Vermont. Can you identify them for me please? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Imc825, these plants are Gaultheria procumbens (eastern spicy-wintergreen). These are subshrubs in the heath family (Ericaceae) with evergreen leaves that have a noticeable wintergreen odor and flavor.
  • Question
    I have notices these plants growing mostly underneath trees around my property in Southwestern Vermont. I have never noticed a flower, although I may have missed them in the past. What are they? Thank you very much for your help.
    Answer
    Dear Imc825, your plant is a species of Pyrola (shinleaf), an herbaceous member of the heath family (Ericaceae). Without measurements of the leaf blade lengths and additional images of intact leaves, I would be hard pressed to tell you which species you are viewing. But perhaps that will get you started in your study of these plants.
  • Question
    Hello. Would you please help me identify a plant I saw yesterday (May 2nd) in a moist field in Western MA? I tried using the Go Botany Simple Key, but only got to step 2. I unfortunately didn't look closely at the center leaves of the plant yesterday and can't tell from my photo whether the leaves are going to grow to be alternate or opposite. I tried just guessing and searching photos on the site, but I can't find a good match. Is there a way to id the plant with just this photo? Thanks!
    Answer
    AbbyG3, your plant looks like the basal leaves of Valeriana officinalis (common valerian). You can confirm this hypothesis by smelling the plant (especially the roots), which will have a pungent and rank smell. This is a non-native plant that originates in Europe. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Only an inch or two tall, found in rich damp woods in Northampton, MA. Picture taken May 2nd. Appears to be one leaf dividing into three palmate leaflets? Both the flower bud and leaf shape looks a little like an extremely small Aralia nudicaulis to me, but doesn't seem like the right habitat. There were many individual plants in a small area. Thank You!!
    Answer
    Dear foamflower, your image is of an herbaceous plant called Panax trifolius (dwarf ginseng). It is a spring ephemeral that will senesce early in the season (usually by the end of June). Best wishes.
  • Question
    please help me identify this plant. it is a climbing plant, i have never seen it produce flowers, it grows mostly in the swampy areas in the grass land of Cameroon.
    Answer
    Dear solowise11, thank you for the beautiful image. Unfortunately, I am not able to assist as my expertise is primarily the tracheophytes of northeastern North America. You might find assistance by contacting folks at the National Herbarium of Cameroon (Gaston Achoundong, Chief, email: gachoundong@yahoo.fr). If they do not have an answer, they may be able to direct you to people who can help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have checked wildflower books and cannot seem to identify this plant. It came up for the first time in my yard in Harwinton CT - near wooded edge of driveway.
    Answer
    Dear jfrancini, thank you for the nice images. Your plant is Petasites japonicus (Japanese sweet-coltsfoot). This species has not been observed in Connecticut outside of cultivation before (to my knowledge). While very interesting and beautiful, be aware it can be very invasive (it has bee observed growing invasively in Maine within New England). Thank you for posting.
  • Question
    Hi everyone, Does anyone know what kin of plant or flower this may be? I was raking away some of the heavy leaves on the trails in the woods of our new home and found tons of them. They were buried under the leaves, seem to be almost natural borders to the worn trail and larger clusters can be seen at tree based or out of rotting stumps. Otherwise there are one or two every few inches in almost straight lines. They are spiral almost come like with white stems. They held up well to being raked
    Answer
    Dear Lasombrs, these appear to be the expanding leaves of Maianthemum canadense (often called Canada-mayflower, a member of the Ruscaceae). These plants are very common in the New England area. When they emerge in the spring, they are rolled up (as you have pictured) and expand after they protrude through the leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    More of a how-to question here: How do I tell apart the stalk of an asian bittersweet from a wisteria? I have a trellis with a white wisteria on it, but the bittersweet has invaded. I want to stop the the bittersweet and leave the wisteria. Is the bittersweet a coarser trunk than the wisteria? Location of the trellis in in Haverhill MA. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear petenh, I would use details of the winter buds or simply wait for the lianas to leaf out and follow down the stems to identify which to remove from the trellis. However, I will assume that is not easily possible. It is very difficult for me to describe the bark of these two species in words, especially because it changes as they age (i.e., both species have different bark on the younger vs. older parts of the plants). I would encourage you to do a image search on the web for "celastrus orbiculatus bark" and "wisteria bark" and carefully study the images. Best of luck with your project.
  • Question
    Hello! I wondered if you can tell me whether the objects embedded in the deer in the photo are plant parts and, if so, what plant do they belong to? This deer was seen in someone's backyard in NH this week.
    Answer
    Dear jellis04, nothing comes to mind at the moment. It would be great if there was a higher resolution image that I could expand to study. If you are able to secure one, please feel free to send it to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Best wishes.
  • Question
    How can I explain the two different colors on the same branch of an azalea bush? Please see picture. Thank you,
    Answer
    Dear pdass20, wonderful picture, thank you for sharing. I assume this is a cultivated azalea. That being the case, you might want to inquire (if possible) where is was sourced and question the nursery. Such differences are sometimes possible with grafting. I'll inquire with our horticultural staff and report back in the near future.
  • Question
    What is this? Found at Dexter Drumlin, So Lancaster, MA. 4-21-2015 approx 3:30P rubbery leaf structure, found in wet grass near brook. Orchid? reminiscent of a jack in the pulpit or Venus fly trap. sturdy. Larger than golf ball smaller than tennis ball
    Answer
    Dear Denosaurous, your picture is the inflorescence of Symplocarpus foetidus (skunk-cabbage). The red/purple mottled structure is a bract (a modified leaf) called a spathe that encloses the flowers. A little later, the leaves will emerge. If you bruise one of the leaves, you will get a characteristic fetid odor that gives this plant its name. Best wishes.
  • Question
    ...and another follow-up to yesterday's question: I revisited the full key and now I think it's a trailing arbutus! Sorry if I'm overloading the inbox... --Eric
    Answer
    Excellent work EricM. Glad you were able to work through the key and arrive at a correct answer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello- Just a follow-up to my question from yesterday, with a better pic, I think. Average-size acorn cap for scale, and I now think the plant grows like a creeper. --Eric
    Answer
    Beautiful image. No worries on number of posts. It is better to have more images and information than less. Epigaea repens (trailing-arbutus).
  • Question
    What kind of plant is this?
    Answer
    Dear mdoocy, thank you for your post. I'm not able to identify your plant for several reasons. While it does look like several members of the Apiaceae (celery family), this group of plants is difficult and often requires flowers and/or fruits for confident identification. Also, I do not know where this plant is from, what habitat it grew in, and when the photograph was taken (i.e., the time of year). There are upwards of 500,000 plants in the world, and the above information (especially location) is critical for narrowing down the choices and arriving at an identification. If you are able to get additional images when the plant flowers and provide location, habitat, etc., we may be able to help you further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Newbie here, really like the full-key plant ID, but couldn't find my mystery plant. The foliage and plant height are similar to wintergreen, but got no wintergreen scent from the leaves, and the flowers don't look like what I see for wintergreen species. Here are a couple pics. Leaves are on the order of one inch long. Photographed April 18 in oak/pine woods in Truro, MA.
    Answer
    Dear EricM, thank you for the detailed information about location, habitat, and time of year. This kind of information is frequently lacking from many posts, which makes it harder to identify the plants. The plant you are interested in is called Epigaea repens (trailing-arbutus). It is sometimes known as mayflower, though in this part of the world, it frequently flowers before May. Like the Gaultheria procumbens (spicy-wintergreen) in your image, it belongs to the Ericaceae (heath family). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Kindly identify the plant and its utilisation
    Answer
    Dear Marakocho, I'm sorry, but from the images you've provided, I'm not able to assist. There is important information that would be needed to help narrow down choices and determine what your plant is. Location in the world and habitat information are critical pieces of information. Please keep in mind, Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern North America). While we are happy to try to help everyone, some plants from far outside this region may be difficult for us to assist.
  • Question
    What kind of plant is this growing on the branches of this tree? This is in Madison, Wisconsin.
    Answer
    nate_luevana, there are no images associated with your question, so I am unable to help you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to send pictures to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you further.
  • Question
    This is a common ground cover plant in Qatar, but I heard that it comes from the United States. Can you tell me the name of the plant?
    Answer
    Dear tmichel3516, there is no image attached to your post. If you are having trouble posting images, please feel free to contact me using the email address ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and provide as many images as you can to help with the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi I have two flowering plants that are driving me nuts if I could get some Id help would be great. The Pink with the white flower tips grow everywhere along the Chagrin river in Ohio, the ones with the yellow heads I have only seen a couple but in the same area, they are more like a begonia stem, and will tolerate a floodplain.
    Answer
    Grizzlyman03, the image with the yellow flowers is Tussilago farfara (coltsfoot). This plant is native to Europe. The pink flowers are Petasites hybridus (butterbur sweet-coltsfoot), another native of the Old World. Both will produce foliage leaves later in the spring (they emerge after the leaves, a condition called precocious). Best wishes.
  • Question
    What kind of plant is this? I can't remember if i planted this or if its a weed. It is spreading really quickly.
    Answer
    mdoocy, there is no image included with this post. Therefore, I can't help you any further. If you are having trouble posting an image, feel free to send it by email to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Please be sure to let me know what part of the world the plant comes from and the habitat. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you please let me know what type of plant this is and the best way to re-pot it...right size pot....soil...and so forth. Thanks.
    Answer
    cdw80, there is no image attached to this post, so I can't help you regarding information of the plant of interest. If you are having trouble posting an image, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you further.
  • Question
    Can you please help me identify this plant. It was found in Hereford, TX. This is the Great Plains of north Texas.
    Answer
    Dear Zachariahhawk, without flowering or fruiting material, I would not be able to provide you a confident answer. It does appear your plant belongs to a group of legumes that includes Trifolium (clover), Medicago (alfalfa), and Melilotus (sweet-clover). These are herbaceous species that have toothed leaflets. While I can't see details that would allow vegetative identification, it look much like the leaves of sweet-clover (though flowers will likely be necessary to confirm this). Hopefully this gives you a direction to begin your study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm in New Hampshire. What plant is this? It's the first plant to emerge in the spring. I haven't seen any flowers.
    Answer
    Dear LauraM, your plant is likely Arum italicum (Italian arum), a species in the Araceae (arum family) native to the Mediterranean region and portions of Europe. Once it flowers it may develop bright red (very showy) fruit. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here, for the closer picture of the plant. I am Danyael, the one you asked for a closer picture earlier. Can I ask you what plant this is?
    Answer
    Dear Danyael, as best we can tell, your plant appears to be a species of Bucida (black-olive), perhaps Bucida spinosa (dwarf black-olive) or a hybrid with that species. These are woody species in the Indian-almond family (Combretaceae). Bucida spinosa is native to tropica and near tropical regions of the New World (southern Florida and Caribbean). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am from India... I enclose two photos of plants which are growing in my home backyard..could you help me to identify these plants...?
    Answer
    Dear Dhanuja, there are no images attached to your message. Without them, I can't offer any assistance. Please try again or email your images to ahaines[at]newenglandwiild.org so that I can view them. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant grows in the Northern parts of Cameroon which has a tropical climate and a Savanna type vegetation. Used for nail beautification and alleged to have anti-fungal property against Onychomycosis. Please help me classify it.
    Answer
    Dear solowise11, I'm sorry, in this case I cannot assist you. However, there are botanical institutions in Cameroon that you could send these pictures to--and they may be able to help you with an identification of this plant. The National Herbarium of Cameroon is one place you might try. The correspondent there is Gaston Achoundong, who can be reached at gachoundong@yahoo.fr. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Someone gave me this plant as a graduation gift and I do not know what kind of plant it is. Can I please ask you what plant it is? I live in the Philippines though.
    Answer
    Dear Danyael, thank you for your question. In order to help you, I would need an image that is closer to the plant (the one posted doesn't provide much detail that would be needed to identify the species). While cultivated plants are not the focus of Go Botany, we are always happy to try and assist. If you could post some more detailed images it would help immensely. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I enclose 2 Photos dated June 2014. The plants were growing in the old cranberry bogs on Hobomock and Monroe streets in Pembroke, Ma Could you give me more information on this Astragalus ? Thank you
    Answer
    Dear verajean, there are no images attached to your message. I would be happy to assist you, but will need to receive images in order to offer you help. If you are having trouble posting them here, you can send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild[dot]org so that I can view them. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This lovely flower was growing wild in my front yard in Lincoln, MA last summer. Any idea what it might be?
    Answer
    Dear mbelge, your plant is Aquilegia canadensis (red columbine), a native member of the Ranunculaceae (crowfoot family). While it occurs in many kinds of habitats, this plant is perhaps most frequent in rocky forests where it adds to the abundant spring flowering found in that habitat.
  • Question
    In December, on Napatree beach, I found a lovely, sprawling plant with a rainbow of pastel colored leaves. I took a tiny sprig that wouldn't be missed and tried sprouting it at home. It is growing beautifully - even starting to flower! Now, my best guess for ID is an Ambrosia of some kind (chamissonis?). If that's true, do you think I should terminate my sprout before it becomes a major allergen in my home??
    Answer
    Dear stinforthewin, Your plant is Artemisia stellariana (beach wormwood), a plant found along the Atlantic coast in New England. It is originally native to Asia. Enjoy it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    looking for identification of this plant.mostly grows in the tropics.
    Answer
    solowise11, thank you for question, but I'm not sure we will be able to help you with this particular question. While you have been helpful in narrowing down the area this plant comes from, the tropics are a large region of the world. It would be very helpful to have more details about the location this plant hails from and additional images (if that were possible). Sorry to not be able to provide you with an answer to your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    looking for identification of this plant. here is a picture of the leaf. it grows in sun or shade.
    Answer
    Dear solowise11, thank you for posting a question, but there is not enough information to help you. There are upwards of 500,000 species of plants in the world, and botanists use various kinds of information to narrow down the choices and arrive at an answer. To help you further, we would need to know where this plant comes from, is it wild or cultivated, woody or herbaceous, etc. Additional images of flowers and/or fruits would be especially helpful. Unfortunately, in this case, just an image of a leaf is not supplying enough details to assist you. While we are happy to entertain all plant related questions, Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I am sending more photos of the black flower. It blooms in early march for only a few weeks. The flower itself grows only to about 12 inches and the foliage to about twice that. It has three black petals with green wings. The foliage is grass like and has four sides. It has a very sweet fragrance. No fruit that I have seen. the root grows off to a 90 degree angle of plant. It grows in full sun or shade. It has returned every year for 15 years with no problem.
    Answer
    Dear bcostner_nc, these pictures are very useful. They indicate this is a species of Iris. Your plant is Iris tuberosa (widow iris), a species native to the Mediterranean region. It has been called Hermodactylus tuberosus in the literature (should you come across that name). I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Looking for identification of this plant. It has black petals, grass like folage, flower less than foot tall. Blooms in early March for short period in North Carolina. I can't seem to find anything like it on any website.
    Answer
    Dear bcostner_nc, I'm unsure what plant you have photographed. Is this a wild species or a cultivated one? Are you able to post additional images (including the fruit)? If so, I may be able to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi Please help me find the name of the plant its small and have no flowers , grows like a vine thanks Jailam
    Answer
    Jim, There are no images attached to this post, so I am not able to help you. If you are having trouble with images, send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org so that I can view them and try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hello, I'm from Illinois. I received seeds for a plant. I was told that this is a money plant but I'm not sure.
    Answer
    Dear Klara97, your image just shows the two seed leaves emerging from the soil. At this point is would be very difficult for anyone to identify your plant. Once it has produced foliage leaves, we might be able to offer help. If you could take another image when it is larger and post it here, we should be able to give you some further direction (if not, we might require flowers). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This grew in a container in Stowe, Vermont. I don't know what it is. Thank you in advance, Ellen
    Answer
    Dear Eobambara, it is difficult to tell from your image, but it could be a pepper (genus Capsicum). Images of the flowers would be helpful, if they are available. Go Botany is a website dedicated to the wild plant of New England. While we are happy to entertain any plant-related questions, cultivated plants hail from many parts of the world. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good morning, could you please help with the identification of this woody plant? I found it yesterday in Fitchburg, MA on an upland, sandy gravelly soils. It seemed to be a small tree, or large shrub, with only a single stem growing from the base (at least as far as I could tell with 3 feet of snow!). I thought working through the buds would make it obvious, but I'm stuck! My first thought was hazelnut, but I sold on it. Thanks, in advance!
    Answer
    Dear KDC, the branch appears to be from Ulmus pumila (Siberian elm). It has the correct phyllotaxis (arrangement of the winter buds) and shape. You can examine images on Go Botany for this species and see other winter bud images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Can you tell me if Oenothera cruciate has been renamed? I can't seem to find it anywhere however O. parviflora pops up in a search but that was originally a different flower all together so I'm a tad confused. Thanks for any help you can provide.
    Answer
    Dear Jgreco, Oenothera cruciata is a form of Oenothera parviflora. This particular petal morphology has been studied in detail and found to be a simple genetic mutation that does not breed true. Therefore, it is included in Oenothera parviflora as one of the forms that can be displayed by this species. Please let me know if I can help any further.
  • Question
    My property in W. Mass has a large patch of some sort of plant that resembles Water Hemlock (C. maculata), but I am questioning this ID after researching Aegopodium podagraria. The two look very similar to the plants on my property (which grow on a septic mound). It's possible both occur there. What is the best way to tell the two apart? The leaves look very different, but the flowers seem nearly identical to my eye. The attached photos are from summer 2014.
    Answer
    Dear vfrano, the plants you have photographed are Aegopodium podagraria. The broad leaf segments are very informative (Cicuta maculata has very different leaves with much smaller ultimate segments)--examine this image: http://newfs.s3.amazonaws.com/taxon-images-1000s1000/Apiaceae/cicuta-maculata-le-dkausen.jpg . Also, the veins on the leaf segments are directed to the sinuses between the teeth in Cicuta maculata (rather than directed to the tips of the teeth in most Apiaceae genera). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was looking at the questions at this site and I saw one about pollen tubes. I've had a question about that,and decided to paste it here. What makes a plant’s pollen send out a pollen tube? What is the stuff, the material, on a flower’s stigma that makes a pollen grain send out a pollen tube? Is it water? I’m pretty sure it isn’t that because I’ve never seen pollen grains sending out pollen tubes in puddl
    Answer
    Dear pkbeep, when the pollen lands on a compatible stigma, there are several things required for it to germinate (as you noted, they do not germinate when they land in puddles). In some cases, the pollen grain must first hydrate, this accomplished by liquid present on the stigmatic surface. There are proteins, waxes, and lipids that are involved in signaling hydration and adhesion to the stigma and subsequent germination of the pollen grain. Germination is also thought to be regulated by specific polyphenol compounds. Therefore, a pollen grain will not germinate anywhere, but must experience the correct set of conditions. And those conditions are only met on stigmas of the same species (and, in some cases, in closely related species).