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Native Plant Trust: Go Botany Discover thousands of New England plants

Questions and Answers

2018

  • Question
    I want to know it name
    Answer
    Dear azeemmosoodahmed, good morning. I'm sorry that I cannot help you. Without knowing where this plant came from and the habitat located in, it is difficult to proceed with the identification. Please keep in mind that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have no idea where this plant came from but i adored it every year for several years. when i tried to split it at the root to separate it but lost it. i was crushed. it is NOT in the tulip family as many told me. it is not a tall version rather it spreads low to the ground. the leaves are also rather soft like lambs ear but it obviously flowers. i would be indebted to you if you can identify and tell me where i can buy it PLEASE!katie henderson USN MAS gloriaj9@sbcglobal.net6184077078
    Answer
    Dear Gloria, good morning. It does appear that you have photographed a species of Tulipa (tulip), simply one with more tepals (petals and sepals) than is usual. These "double flowers", as they are sometimes called, are common in the horticultural trade. I do not know which cultivar this is, but enjoy it.
  • Question
    Sorry about my manners. Good Morning. Thank you for your early response and your help. Being new to this, I will try to give more details in future. I have attached another photo that may help.
    Answer
    Tarranmaharaj, good morning. I am not familiar with the flora of Trinidad. However, your plant appears similar to Sagittaria platyphylla (delta arrowhead), and may be that species or one very similar. I'm sorry I can't help further, Trinidad is a long way from my area of expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in Trinidad and Tobago. It is 10 degrees north of the equator. I have been photographing our flora which in some cases be similar to those of the US. I will like to get help with identification, if you can help, please. This was found in an almost stagnant stream.
    Answer
    Dear tarranmaharaj, good morning. I can't identify your plant because there are no leaves visible in the image. It is always best, when possible, to get several images of the plants and the different parts of the plants. From what I can see, you appear to have a member of the Alismataceae (water-plaintain family), and it appears you have a species in the genus Sagittaria (arrowhead). I'm sorry I can't be of more assistance.
  • Question
    I am afraid I can’t be certain about the habitat of the plant species to which this seed belongs but it could be the UK or New England. I would appreciate your kind assistance. The seed is likely quite old but seems to have kept its colour. It might have been used as a bead in a necklace. The scale is inches and fractions thereof. Thus the seed is about 4/10ths of an inch in diameter. It was found under floorboards.
    Answer
    Dear SDixon, I do wish I could help, but I don't recognize that seed. I'm sorry, but without more information, I won't be able to assist.
  • Question
    Hi, first post. I live in Brooklyn, NY and currently have 17 houseplants in my apartment. I love plants! Can someone help me identify this plant, please? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear yodastaxx, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Without them I won't be able to assist. But, also please keep in mind that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. I can try to assist you, but cultivated species are not my area of expertise. If you still want to try, feel free to email your images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will attempt to help.
  • Question
    Grandma got some "winter flower" seeds and is growing these plants. She says they are from the same plant but I don't recognize them. I'd really appreciate it if anyone here can identify the 2 plants on this picture I took from her indoor plants. AC
    Answer
    Dear Moncro, good morning. I can't identify both plants in your image, but the one on the left looks like Stellaria media (common stitchwort), a frequent weed and contaminate in seed packages. It likely got mixed in with the species that was labeled on the package. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, What I have is a question. Coming to know that Sedges have edges, Rushes are round, Grasses have nodes that might bend to the ground, I have a need to confirm... What is being talked about is the main stem. Grasses are hollow with nodes. Rushes are solid and round and Sedges are triangular. I've been having trouble because all of these plants have leaves with edges. Thank you for your help! Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, good morning. The situation is actually more complex than the simplified statements portray for remembering families of grass-like plants. The "sedges have edges" comment refers to their stems, which are often (but by no means always) triangular in cross-section, so that you can often feel the edges of the stem (not the leaves) with your fingers. It turns out that several genera have other shapes to the cross-section of the stems, including round, bluntly triangular, square, and with 4 or more wing angles. Some of those species can be separated because they have leaves in three ranks (grasses have leaves in two ranks). Most sedges have flowers that are spirally arranged (those of grasses are arranged in only two ranks). Yes, most grasses have hollow stems, but both sedges and grasses have nodes (it is just that grass nodes are usually swollen and more prominent). I hope this helps a little.
  • Question
    Hi. what is the name of this plant
    Answer
    Dear Wisksam, I'm sorry I cannot help you. Without knowing the location of this plant, which is very important for identification, there are too many possibilities to search through. If you can provide location information and describe the habitat so it is possible to discern if this is planted or wild, it might allow an answer to be found. If you want to pursue this question, feel free to email this information to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org.
  • Question
    The woods behind my house is covered with this stuff. I live in Plymouth Mass. I haven't captured whether it has any fruit or not yet, but I'm trying to figure out if this is a wild non-native burning bush outbreak. Are these photos enough to identify it? Do I need to get better ones? If it isn't burning bush, do you know what else it might be or what else I should look for on the plant to identify it. I took these pictures specifically because of the bright red color it takes on in fall.
    Answer
    Dear jaf, There are no images associated with your question, without them, I won't be able to assist. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I will examine them and try to help.
  • Question
    Hello, Here I have a glorious hairy sedge that I need help identifying. I did look at all of your offerings but unfortunately I was unable to sort it out. This plant is in Salem Sound, Massachusetts Thank you for your time and expertise! Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, good morning. The plant you have photographed is part of the Luzula campestris complex (wood-rush). It is most likely Luzula multiflora (common wood-rush), the most frequent species in this complex within New England. Without some additional details, the best I can do is an educated guess. I hope this is useful.
  • Question
    Hello, I was hoping someone would be able to identify for me what type of grass I have here. It is short growing for sure but this is in a lawn that is mowed. It is located in Salem Sound. Thank you, Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, good morning. I can't identify this grass, it is just too immature for me to tell who it is from images. I have some guesses, but they are not confident ones. If you get a chance to get a later image with mature spikelets, I should be able to help you. I'm sorry I can't help (with confidence) this time.
  • Question
    good day! there is this vine plant that I am curious of because it is all over our town and I would like to know its species, I would be very glad if you could help me with this. I am from the philippines and it is located in the visayas region. thank you!
    Answer
    Dear ziamae10, good morning. There is no image associated with your question, without one, I won't be able to assist. Equally as important, you are a long way from my region of expertise. While I am not sure if I would be able to assist, you are free to attach the images to an email. If you send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I will examine them and try to help.
  • Question
    11/25/2018 Found this growing on and around a stone wall and a number of them are scattered around this area. They have kept their rosette leaves even after several days of temps in the teens and twenties.
    Answer
    Dear David, this looks like Hieracium maculatum (spotted hawkweed), a non-native member of the composite family. It is known from northern New England (not sure where you photographed this), quite abundant in some locations in Maine. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello new to this sight, I didn’t realize this was for New England, I am a landscaper and am getting to the point of trying to find and cultivate plants, and in my searches I have come a cross many plants that the either the homeowner or I, or my boss could Not identify, am I allowed to use this and start a profile of personal plants I find interesting, and am trying to cultivate, and use this as a resource for plant identification that is not in New England?
    Answer
    Dear Ironwingdragon, good morning and welcome to Plant Share. You may ask any plant-related questions you have. Given that my expertise is wild plants of northeastern North America, I may not be able to assist with species that are cultivated from other regions. But, you can always post your questions and I may be able to help. Looking forward to your participation here. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi there! I’m stumped (no pun 😊) on this shrub. The dichotomous key brought me to Ligustrum Vulgaris (privet), but the leaves are not glossy and the flowers, although looking like privet flowers have a very strong pleasant fragrance and not pungent as the key indicates. The habitat is usually very close to wetland areas or border areas near thick woods. I live in Rockport, Ma. Thank you! 😊👍
    Answer
    Dear Ebelair, good morning. You do indeed have a species of Ligustrum, but I can't answer which one without a close-up image of the branchlets. The indumenta (description of the hairs) of the branchlets is critical for identification. Perhaps knowing you are in the correct genus will give you the information you need.
  • Question
    Please let me know what is this plant is? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Siddi1quehuq, I'm sorry I cannot help you. Without knowing more about this plant (where is it from, what habitat was growing in, is it wild or cultivated) I'm at a loss. Location information is really critical. Again, I'm sorry I can't help.
  • Question
    Hi! I found these interesting flowers growing mainly under the trees in the shade or in between rocks. There are only 1-2 leaves per flower. Would you be able to tell me what these plant is? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear SeanScott, it looks like you have photographed Arisarum vulgare (friar's cowl), a member of the arum family that is native to Europe and northern Africa. Was this a species that you found growing wild in New England? If so, I would like to discuss your find with you as this species hasn't been collected in the wild in this region. I can be reached at ahaines@newenglandwild.org, thank you.
  • Question
    Hello there, I am hoping that you are able to positively identify this Willow! It is located on the edge of a fresh water pond, in Salem Sound, Salem, Ma Thank you, Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, I'm sorry that I can't help you--sort of. The expanding leaves are a species of chokeberry (Aronia arbutifolia, red chokeberry), a native in the Rosaceae. The aments (i.e., catkins) belong to a willow, but I would need very close up views to see the necessary structures to identify the willow based on its flowers. I wish I could help you further.
  • Question
    For a flower that has ONLY sepals or ONLY petals - how do you determine if this flower has sepals or petals?
    Answer
    Dear mcyr1313, the answer to this is generally a case by case basis. But, in the simplest terms, if a flower has only a single whorl of perianth parts (sepals, petals, corono), then by convention they are referred to as sepals. If they are brightly pigmented, then they are referred to as petaloid sepals. Examples of this include members of the genus Anemone, Caltha, and Clematis.
  • Question
    Hello, found this plant on top of a shaded forested ridge with shallow bedrock in Southeastern CT in September. The surrounding forest was oak/hickory. This herbaceous plant was approximately 1ft in height. The stems had a "delicate" appearance. Leaves were opposite and margins entire. Small green capsules were observed. It was part of an community of other plants included eastern bottle-brush grass, common barberry, and maidenhair spleenwort. Thanks for the help.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, you have photographed Paronychia canadensis (smooth forked whitlow-wort). This is a species that is typically found in woodlands and along ridges and balds, more common in the southern part of New England.
  • Question
    This plant is at Riley's Lock on the C and O canal in Darnstown MD. Can you identify it? Greatly appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear Starwoman1967, I do not know for certain what species of plant you have photographed. Maryland is south of my area of expertise and their could be species of plants their I'm not familiar with. It looks close to Polymnia canadensis (white-flowered leaf-cup) with broader lobes than usual. However, I cannot be confident in this case without additional images of the plant.
  • Question
    Hello again, Here I have another Red Maple, Acer Rubrum, that looks significantly different from the other two I presented to Go Botony earlier. Interesting to me is that these trees, (there are 4, all different, one more to come), are all on my property, less than 100 feet or so of each other. Thank you for any information you may be able to give me. Happy Thanksgiving! Sue L-B, Salem Sound, Salem, Ma...
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, yes, this one looks to be Acer rubrum as well. This is another of the "hairy morphs" with abundant pubescence on the leaf blades. Beautiful trees. Again, keep in mind, this species is very morphologically variable. Individuals often looks somewhat different.
  • Question
    If a flowering plant has no sepals or no petals how to do tell which is which?
    Answer
    Dear mcyr1313, many species of plants do not require flower or fruits to identify them. We rely on their vegetative characteristics, such as leaf arrangement, leaf blade margin, presence/absence of hairs, leaf length, bark color (for woody species), and a host of other characters. For example, even without flowers we can tell different kinds of roses apart because they have different shapes of prickles, different numbers of leaflets, different hypanthia shapes, different kinds of hairs on the sepals and hypanthia, etc. Some plants needs flowers and/or fruits for identification, but many don't.
  • Question
    Hello, this plant was observed in northern Somerset County Maine in August. The plant was approximately 5in tall. The leaves were alternate and finely serrated. The stems were woody and brown on the lower portion of the plant. The forest was boreal, specifically upland Spruce/Fir. The ground cover was dominated by moss. Other plants included blueberry, Clintonia borealis and gaultheria procumbens (as shown in the photo). The area was surrounding a black spruce bog.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, good morning. I do not know for certain what the plant is that you have photographed. It looks like a species of Vaccinium (blueberry) that has been damaged in some way and is trying to recover. I've seen similar blueberry growth in various parts of Maine. This is best hypothesis at the moment.
  • Question
    This fern was observed in the crevice on a large rock outcropping (some kind of acidic granite) in Northern Somerset County Maine. The Fern was in a clump along with moss. The stipe/rachis had fine down. The sori and underside were gray and downy as a well. The upperside of pinnae was smooth. The stipe was reddish.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, you have photographed Woodsia ilvensis (rusty cliff fern). This species has abundant narrow scales on the petiole. Also, the indusium is inferior and splits apart in many segments, making the the underside of the leaf blade look "hairy". This is a common species on cliffs and ledges.
  • Question
    Question about Rubus chamaemorus. Flowers are unisexual, only 1 flower on each aboveground stem. The stems grow from rhizomes. Do rhizomes produce more than one aboveground stem? If so, are individual plants monecious, with both staminate and carpellate flowers produced by the same rhizome, or dioecious, with flowers of only one sex produced from one rhizome?
    Answer
    Thokozile, the rhizomes can be quite long, and could produce more than one upright stem. However, I haven't ever unearthed the rhizomes to count upright shoots. Assuming they do sometimes produce more than one upright shoot, both shoots would produce the same kind of flower (i.e., the rhizome would give rise to only staminate or only carpellate flowers). Typically, in plants, it is the genetic individual that is carpellate or staminate when species are dioecious. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I saw this bush in Guanajuato, Mexico in October. It has small red flowers, and attracted lots of orange butterfies. It would be great if you are able to identify it. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear barbaraaaa, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help you with your question. Mexico is a long way from my region of expertise. While sometimes I can recognize plants (or at the least the genus of plants) from distant lands, in this case I cannot. I would recommend you contact an herbarium in Mexico or in Texas where you might find some botanists with expertise in that region of the world.
  • Question
    Hi, my name is Oisin, I'm an Irish chef who lives in Mexico. I was wondering if there is any literature that concludes 'Calabrian' chile peppers are in fact escabel, Mexican chili peppers? I find it astounding that they look so similar & fall on the same range in the scoville scale. Not to mention that Columbus' (the first person to bring chile peppers to Europe) voyage to the new world was sponsored by Ferdinand II, who became the ruler of Calabria 9 years later.
    Answer
    Dear OBARR, good morning. I wish I could assist you. This sounds like an interesting mystery in need of solving, but I don't know of any researcher doing this kind of work currently. I hope you find an answer to your question.
  • Question
    I have been looking at Rudbeckia laciniata, but now am too late in the season to check on whether the ray flowers are in fact flowers with potential for fertilization, at least in the right season. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear BKDBCR37, good morning. The ray flowers are neuter (i.e., sterile) in the genus Rudbeckia, so you would need to use disk flowers for fertilization. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello there, I have another unknown Red Maple? that I would like to know more about please. I have 12 photos. It it located in Salem Sound, Massachusetts. Thank you very much for your help. Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, assuming this maple is native to the northeast, it would again be Acer rubrum (red maple). Lots of variation in this species, which ranges the entire eastern US seaboard. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi. We were recently asked to review a site (coastal pond on Cape Cod) for potential Persicaria puritinorum. We did id P.. maculosa on the site, but came across this plant, with smaller leaves and without the visible dark spot in the middle of leaves. With the plants rapidly going into dormancy that could be why they look different. Any help with id on this one is appreciated!
    Answer
    Dear BlueFlax, good morning. There are some details that I'm unable to see, which means I cannot confidently determine the plants in the image. As best I can see, there are no cilia at the summits of the sheathing stipules. Combined with the inflorescence shape and abundant stipitate glands, it suggests Persicaria lapathifolia. However, I would need a better image of the stipules and tepals to know for certain. I hope this helps.
  • Question
    I live in Plymouth, Mass. and I'm attempting to identify the plant behind my house that is prevalent through the woods. I've read about the burning bush being extremely invasive. I'll be attempting to catalogue more data such as fruit (if any exists) and further close ups of the stems and other photos during different seasons, but just wanted to try this now to see if it is obvious. I live near Cranberry bogs - sandy soil / bogland with mossy trees. The red fall foliage increased my curiosity.
    Answer
    Dear jaf, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    I photographed this plant on the west bank of the Kennebec River in Sidney, Maine, on August 20, 2013. It receives direct sunlight in the morning, and the soil in the area has a lot of clay in it. What is it?
    Answer
    Dear DonLemieux, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    This aster was growing along the upper edge of the salt marsh at Joppa Flats, Newburyport. I'm thinking it might be Symphyotrichum ericoides (Heath American-aster), but S. dumosum, racemosum, and lanceolatum looked similar. The tightly-bunched flowers was what made me lean toward S. ericoides, Am I close?
    Answer
    Dear chafeemonell, yes, you have photographed Symphyotrichum ericoides. This particular American-aster is sometimes quite common on the coastal plain near the edges of Atlantic coast beaches and just above the salt marshes. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This solitary plant was found on a rotting woodpile in central MA. Second picture for scale. Thanks in advance for help with ID!
    Answer
    Dear Quinn, this appears to be a species of Persicaria (smartweed). Based on what I can see, it looks most like Persicaria pensylvanica (Pensylvania smartweed), a species that normally grows in wetlands. I am not 100% certain because some features I cannot see, but this is where I would start my search. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi there, This should be a real easy one for you. I am sorry about the photo. It is a photo of a photo on a website that has been listed as unknown. Thank you, SueL-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, it is a species of Senecio (ragwort), possibly Senecio vulgaris. It is hard for me to know which species it is for certain because of the photo quality, but this should get everyone started. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! I found this plant by a wetland and was curious as to what it was. The leaves kind of looked like a Thalictrum pubescens but I'm not sure. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear mlabrie4600, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Hello, Here I have a most beautiful unknown Maple tree. It is located in Salem Sound in Massachusetts. I will present you with 17 photos. I hope I have captured all that you need! Thank you very much, Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, the woody plant in the photographs is Acer rubrum (red maple). This species is quite variable and has a form where the leaves remain permanently hairy across the lower surface (it was called variety tomentosum). That is the form you have found, which is not common in the northeast and perhaps why it looks unusual to you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, Here I will share 14 photos of a most exquisite maple tree. It is a weeping tree. Note photo 13. I am hoping you are able to identify it for me. Unfortunately I have not been able to find a samura. Thank you so much, Sue L-B
    Answer
    SueLB, the species you have photographed is Acer saccharinum (silver maple), a native species that usually inhabits flood plains. The deep sinuses on the leaf blades and arching branchlets are good morphological markers.
  • Question
    I found this in my backyard in Concord, and I am not sure of the species. It has a strong smell, and I am pretty sure it is some type of geranium.
    Answer
    Dear liamberguhn, you appear correct that you have collected a species of Geranium. However, without flowers or fruits, I can't help you any further than this. If you observe reproductive material on these plants, feel free to share the images so that I can try to assist further.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr. I came across a flower that at first suggests Solidago, but upon further investigation I saw an image of a yellow aster. I would appreciate your help. This amazing plant is growing in a crack in the street. Thank you in advance. The plant resides in Malden MA.
    Answer
    Dear califyank, you have photographed Solidago sempervirens (seaside goldenrod). This species is occasionally encountered inland where salting occurs for de-icing roads, parking lots, etc. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Growing in tidal marsh (in mud with grasses) at mouth of Englishman's River, Roque Bluffs, Maine. 19 October, 2018. Is this Lysimachia maritima? "Plants coastal halophytes with fleshy leaf blades." Leaves opposite, without stalk. Aprox. 8 or 10" high. Thank you for taking a look.
    Answer
    Dear Carol, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    This is Populus tree #2 from Berlin, CT. It has larger leaves.
    Answer
    Dear hlbleaf, this appears to be Populus deltoids (eastern cottonwood), a species with large, triangular leaves with course teeth and (in life) a prominent white border around the margin of the leaf. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is Populus tree #3 from Berlin, CT. I think it is P. tremuloides.
    Answer
    Dear hlbleaf, yes, as best as I can tell from your nice series of images, this is Populus tremuloides.
  • Question
    I would like help with three Populus trees with three distinct leaf morphologies. They are growing within a hundred yards of one another in mixed mostly deciduous woods in Berlin, CT. The photos show the trunk at different heights and the leaves on the tree and collected from the ground. I will separate the three trees into three messages. This is #1.
    Answer
    Dear hlbleaf, this aspen looks to be Populus grandidentata (bigtooth aspen). The large teeth number mostly 5-14 teeth per margin is a good characteristic for this species. Given that hybridization does occur, it would be hard to be certain without seeing the plants in life.
  • Question
    Hello mr botanist, can you please help me to identify this beautiful plant ? Thank you very much,
    Answer
    Dear masterflava, I agree the plant in the image is quite beautiful, but I do not recognize it. I assume this is either cultivated or wild growing outside of New England. Feel free to contact me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org if either of those conditions are untrue and we can discuss this plant more with its habitat information. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is a shrub in a nearby residential neighborhood. The resident is a renter and does not know what this plant is. I have not seen one like this before and can't seem to ID it. The unusual red "berries" are multi-lobed. They seem firm. There are also small green berries that are round on the shrub. I am adding some photos. The location is in Charlestown, Rhode Island. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear DianeD1946, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    I'm unsure if this is a mushroom or another type of plant. The location is Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.
    Answer
    Dear sroshongf, good morning. This is a species of fungus known as earthstar. These are a family of fungi (Geastraceae), of which there are tens of species known from it. I hope this is helpful and wish you well.
  • Question
    hello, I need to identify this plant, any help !!!
    Answer
    Dear khaledhassan90, I'm sorry but I cannot help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild-growing plants of northeastern North America. Cultivated species and those from other parts of the world may be unknown to me (as in this case). It could be a species of Hosta (also known by the common name hosta), but I cannot see the image well enough to be certain.
  • Question
    Hi there. Is this plant American dunegrass (Leymus mollis)? I photographed it on the backside of a cobble dune (and adjacent to a salt marsh) in Marblehead Mass. Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear b.p.rickards, yes, the plants in the photographs do look like Leymus mollis. It should have hairy glumes (the outer scales of each spikelet) and relatively short awns or none at all on the lemmas (i.e., the inner scales should have very short or no bristles extending off their apex). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant is at my daughter's near clearwater, FL. Please identify it. Should she keep it?
    Answer
    Dear dpmc61, I'm sorry I cannot help you with this question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. There are organizations closer to you that should be able to assist you. If you are not sure how to locate them, feel free to email at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can assist you in locating one. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Totally puzzled
    Answer
    Sangeeth, this is likely an array of immature fruits, before they turn orange-red, of Arum italicum (Italian arum). Watch it over the next few weeks and see if the color change occurs. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good morning Dr. I was delighted to find Solidago growing on my neighbors rock wall. The culm is growing down rather than up! The feature the surprised me was the spathulate leaf shape on the basal leaves. The characteristics seems to fit Solidago nemoralis. Can you confirm this? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear califyank, the images you have provided are consistent with Solidago nemoralis. To confirm this, you would need to observe dense, minute hairs on the vegetative portion of the stem (that which is below the branches leading to capitula). This pubescence doesn't show well in photographs without shooting images very close. If those hairs are present, you likely have Solidago nemoralis. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I was at Garden in the Woods recently and keyed out a plant to be Blue Mistflower Conoclinum coelestrinium or Eupatorium coelesrinium. I cannot find on Go botany or Wildflowers of New England?
    Answer
    Dear swampthing, Conoclinium coelestinum is not yet known to be a member of the wild flora of New England. While found over a large area in the eastern and southeastern US, it has not been collected outside of cultivation in our region--this is the reason why you do not find it on Go Botany. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you tell me what this plant is please?
    Answer
    Dear Funkycold, you appear to have photographed a species of Iris, likely Iris foetidissima (stinking iris). It is native to Europe. The red seeds within the capsule are distinctive compared with most of the irises I'm familiar with in North America (for example).
  • Question
    Hey, I’m very sorry about the picture quality. I’ve only seen this plant a few times before and I just got a glimpse of one as I was driving by. It it a taller plant, similar in form to a bulrush but kind of looks like wheat. Extremely fluffy looking and white. This is in the more northern part of Québec, Canada. Any idea of what this may be? Thank you so much.
    Answer
    Dear Sao, it looks like a species of Miscanthus (silvergrass), a non-native species plants for ornament. I can't tell you which one with confidence, but based on the white hairs within the inflorescence, it appears to be Miscanthus sacchariflorus (Amur silvergrass).
  • Question
    Hi, found this 6ft sedge in a emergent freshwater wetland (Southeastern CT). A single plant was identified with one inflorescence. The spikelets were elongated and pendulous. It looks similar to Scirpus pendulus, however, it seems a bit out of range based on the map.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, good morning. Given that the spikelets are in gomerules, this is most likely Scirpus cyperinus (common woolsedge). Scirpus pendulus has solitary spikelets (either on pedicels or one sessile). The time of year would be helpful in identifying this bulrush as well because Scirpus cyperinus matures later than other closely related species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this plant was observed in a deciduous forest. The plant was approximately 10 inches tall, with serrated leaves and green capsules in a raceme. The steam was reddish. The plant is located in S.E. CT.
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, good morning. You appear to have photographed a small plant of Collinsonia canadensis (northern horsebalm). This is a native member of the mint family that is usually found in moist, deciduous forests.
  • Question
    Any idea what kind of tree this is from? It is from the campus of the high school where I teach in Baltimore. I'm guessing some sort of non-native ornamental. Thanks! Allison White
    Answer
    Dear Alison, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr. The aster which I had question about, finally bloomed. My original question was to identify the species of Symphyotrichum. The stem leaves had unusual marginal teeth. The photos are of the flower and phyllaries.
    Answer
    califyank, those capitula look like they belong to Symphyotrichum cordifolium (heart-leaved American-aster). It is the most common species that shows anthocyanic coloration on the involucral bracts. I don't recall now what the leaf blades looked like, so I don't have all the information together on this species. Perhaps you could send me images of leaves and capitula to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org so I can see them all at once and give you a more definitive answer.
  • Question
    Hello, I hope you can help me with this plant. I found it in my aunts yard in Winchester Ma covering/dominating her front grass. I hope it is not a nasty invasive. In the photo one plant is 12 inches over all growing next to grass in a more shaded habitat. The ones dominating the grass and the small one in photo with yellow flower are mostly 4-6 inches high. Thank you, Stephen
    Answer
    Dear stephenturtle, it appears you have photographed a species of Acalypha (three-seeded-mercury), probably Acalypha rhomboidea, the most common (and native) member of the genus in New England.
  • Question
    Cakile edentula, Roque Bluffs, Washington Co Maine tidal marsh edge, 10 Oct. What are the little glandular things on leaves and stems? Are these fungus or slime mold bodies or part of the plant?
    Answer
    Dear Carol_in_Maine, I think you are correct this is a fungal infection, some type of mold. This species is glabrous (i.e., without hairs) in this part of the world. I don't usually see this species with such infections.
  • Question
    Is this plant Persicaria coccinea? Found it on the banks of the Charles River yesterday. Thanks! You can use it on the site if it is, I just wasn't sure.
    Answer
    Dear JulieMeyer, good morning. The answer is: possibly. The extremes of Persicaria amphibia and Persicaria coccinea aren't difficult to identify from photographs, but some individuals I would need to see the actual specimen or individual. The inflorescences and petioles do look too long for Persicaria amphibia, suggesting this is an aquatic form of Persicaria coccinea, but I would need to do measurements to be confident. I'm sorry if this isn't helpful.
  • Question
    Hi, I found this shrub during my site visit. I need to include its scientific name, yet I'm not sure what it is😅 I really hope you can help me. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear bahagia, I'm sorry I can't help you. I don't know where in the world this image was taken, and it appears to be possibly cultivated. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. Feel free to ask any plant-related questions, but those from other regions of the world may not have answers here (though we can help you find someone in your region that may be able to answer).
  • Question
    I’m sending a small donation to New England Wild Flower Society because I really appreciate your helping me identify plants growing on our property. Here’s one I’ve been watching since June. I’m hoping you can help me with this one, especially since I’ve more recently discovered smaller plants popping up on our dry, shady Long Island property. Many thanks for all your help.
    Answer
    Dear MossGal, I'm glad Go Botany has been useful to your study of plants. The pictured species is Epigaea repens (trailing-arbutus), a native, early spring flowering member of the heath family. It is one of the first species to flower, so look for it next spring.
  • Question
    Hello! I found this plant in my yard, which has a lot of disturbed areas, in Worcester County, Massachusetts. I think it might be Japanese Barberry, but am not 100% sure after using this website's key. It mostly has two leaves coming from each bud, but in some places has three, four and five leaves. Can you help identify it? If it is barberry, should I get rid of it? I try to use mostly natives (or at the least, non-invasive species) in the garden.
    Answer
    Dear Ninnybroth, you were correct, this plant is Berberis thunbergii (Japanese barberry). The leaves are produced on short, knob-like spurs called short shoots, so the leaves appear to vary, but they are alternate. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Location: Long Island. I noticed this plant for the first time in early September in a dry, shady area of our property; it is the only specimen that I’ve seen here, and I’m wondering if it could be an escaped cultivar. Hoping you recognize it. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear MossGal, you've photographed a species of Pyrola (shinleaf), likely Pyrola americana. This is a native, herbaceous member of the Ericaceae (heath family), it sometimes produces forms like this where the veins are really prominent.
  • Question
    Howdy. Is Lonactis linarifolia sticky to the touch? Been meeting this (or other?) species in various locations around freeport Maine. Here we are with blueberry & bluestem. At first I had thought Eurybia spectabalis, due to sticky stem, but it looks like that species is not in Maine. In either case, it's causing a lot of delight these days.
    Answer
    Dear limjucy@gmail.com, the plant you've photographed is Ionactis linariifolia. It is very frequent in dry, sterile soils, including thin soils over bedrock outcrops. Great pictures.
  • Question
    Hi, I am living in Trivandrum, India. This plant was presented to my one of my friends. Kindly identify this plant. Thank you. Unnikrishnan
    Answer
    Dear uakeloth, good morning. I wish I could assist you, but India is a long way from my region of expertise. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. You need to locate an herbarium (plant museum) near you that you can send the image to. These museums are online and have addresses you can email to for questions. Good luck.
  • Question
    I saw a number of these plants near the summit of Gunstock Mtn. in Gilford, NH. What is the plant?
    Answer
    Dear Maeve, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Hi, im living in Ontario, Canada and took some photographs of plants around conservative area. Im trying to identify these plants, but hard to identify with ontario's native or invasive plant data. Can you help me what kind of plants are they? They were close to sidewalks and picture were taken at September.
    Answer
    Dear sharon1206, The images are too small for me to help you with identification. The only one I can assist with is the first one (very divided leaves), which looks like Daucus carota (wild carrot). If you have large images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant grows at the edge of our lawn and along the roadside in Caribou, ME. It is so pretty but I haven't been able to find out what it is! Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear J@HeirloomCottageGarden, you've photographed Odontites vulgaris (red false bartsia), a non-native hemiparasite (a species that produces chlorophyll and has invasive connections to other species). I agree, it is very beautiful. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have not been able to identify this plant. Any help will be greatly appreciated. I will upload some photos. I found it in Tyler State Park in Newtown, Pennsylvania in a woodland borderland. The flower has five petals, the leaves are alternated. It is very rare in this neck of the woods. Candido
    Answer
    Dear candido, I don't know which species you have with certainty, as you are south of my range of expertise. However, you appear to have a species with an over-arching, petaloid sepal similar to species of Aconitum (or a member of that complex of genera). Sorry I can't help you further with this question.
  • Question
    I have a small tree that is outside in a pot from April to the end of October. It does not seem deciduous; when I take it in it has not lost any leaves. But indoors, under a plant light, it begins to lose leaves until by mid January it's bare. When I put it back outside in mid April to begins to leaf out by May, gets fully leafed by June and grows new, green branches during the summer. I want to know what it is, and what is the best way to care for it.
    Answer
    Dear jerrycimisi, I wish I could help you, but I don't recognize this tree. Go Botany is website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I'm happy to entertain all plant-related questions, and can sometimes help with cultivated species and/or species from outside this range. But this time I cannot (sorry).
  • Question
    Good morning Arthur I believe that I have found Hieracium paniculatum... and would appreciate your input. From a previous post you indicated the phyllaries were important for the ID. I am a little confused when Go Botany stipulates that the leaf is entire and then the next line states the edge of the blade has teeth. Is this in reference to the position of the blades on the stem? I.e. the basal blades have teeth and the upper blades do not. Again Thank you for your interest and help
    Answer
    califyank, good morning. You have some other species of composite here, but I can't see enough of it to tell you who you have. The peduncles for the flower heads are much too thick (Hieracium paniculatum has very slender peduncles) and the leaves aren't quite right as well. Hieracium paniculatum comes from forests and woodlands--where did this specimen grow? Thank you.
  • Question
    Good Afternoon I have an aster growing in my backyard with rather unusual leaves. The leaves are cordate with a frilly serrate margin. I have include several images. My question is: Are these leaves consistent with Symphyotrichum cordifolium, or are they possibly another? The plant is about 40 cm tall with a purple stem with many buds in the panicle. Again thank you for helping me.
    Answer
    califyank, good morning. These leaves are consistent in many respects with Symphyotrichum cordifolium, though the margin is a little unusual (they can be quire saliently toothed, but I haven't seen them display those kind of teeth). The petiole is slender (i.e., not winged), which is also consistent with this species. Are these plants vegetative? Post images of the flowers if you can.
  • Question
    My first instinct when I saw this plant was to call it Shepherd's Purse, but then I noticed the seed capsule were not heart-shaped. Going through the Brasicaceae, I paused at Iberis amara, but it wasn't documented in my area. Next, I paused in Lepidium, feeling most positive about L. Virginicum, or Poor-man's Pepperweed, though the last photo shows leaves I didn't notice on my plant.
    Answer
    chaffeemonell, it appears you have photographed Lepidium virginicum. The silicles (i.e., fruits) of this genus are not the classic obtriangular found in Capsella, so you were right and perceptive to move on from that. Lepidium virginicum is the most common species in the genus with us, and is frequent in disturbed and agricultural soils.
  • Question
    I'm not sure how to go about the aster-like plants. Here is one around Joppa Flats that pops up in meadows . It looks like S. lanceolatum. Am I on the right track?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, you've photographed Symphyotrichum ericoides (heath American-aster). Notice the squarrose (i.e., outcurved) and spine-tipped involucral bracts in the photo you took (excellent photograph, by the way). These distinguish this species from other American-asters.
  • Question
    This plant spontaneously appeared last year. I’ve never actually caught it in bloom but the seedheads and habitat look like viola hastata, even though we are north of it’s typical range? Is it worth keeping or is it a weed? Location Scarborough, Maine in sandy soil, partial sun.
    Answer
    Dear Fpolygala, good morning. This looks like a hybrid with Viola sagittate (arrowhead violet). This leaf morphology is very typical of hybrids between this species and those with a more cordate leaf blade, such as Viola sororia, Viola cucullata, and similar species. The elongated blade shape comes from Viola sagittate, and the deeper than usual cordate base is from the others. I would not be able to tell you which other species was involved with a specimen or additional photographs, but hopefully this will be helpful.
  • Question
    Good evening. the inflorescence of this grass looks like some of the barleys or foxtails, But i could seem to find a good match in the guide. Can you zero me in? It's on the upper bank of the salt marsh, Joppa Flats Ed Center. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear chafeemonell, the grass in the picture is likely Setaria pumila (yellow foxtail), a species that has been called Setaria glauca in older literature. It is a fairly common, non-native grass that grows in open, disturbed areas. There is a native species in this genus (Setaria parviflora) that grows at the edges of tidal marshes, it is a perennial with knotty rhizomes. However, The Joppa Flats Education Center is likely just out of range of this species, but you might check to see if you have a new county record.
  • Question
    Sorry, but somehow my last question was submitted before all photos were uploaded. These are early September images of a grass taken on our dry, sandy property on Long Island. I’m trying to replace old turf grass with native plants wherever possible. If you can help ID this grass, I would greatly appreciate it. Many thanks!
    Answer
    Dear MossGal, I can't confidently tell you which species you have because I can't see details of the spikelets. If you could get a close-up of the floral structures, I might be able to do better. The grass looks like Muhlenbergia sobolifera (rock muhly), a native grass of forests and woodlands, often rocky ones. Perhaps you could research that possibility. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Thank you for identifying Trichostema dichtomum for me.
    Answer
    Dear MossGal, I'm happy to help anytime. You have some images of grasses here, but I do not know where they are from or what habitat they were found in. Could you elaborate on this? Thank you (feel free to email me direction at ahaines[at]newenglandlandwild.org for this or any other questions).
  • Question
    what is this plant and is bit beneficial and edible? Ohio North central woodland.
    Answer
    Dear plant_ted, you've photographed Solidago caesia (blue-stemmed goldenrod). It is a native species of forests and forest edges. In my area it is one of the later flowering species, and is visited by native bees. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Plant located at 28 Erbeck Cir., Bridgewater, MA, Lat:41.98438, Lng:-70.93318. Started growing next to my deck in early spring this year. Home adjacent to mixed woodland. It receives about 4-6 hours of sun although the amount is decreasing due to its location. Initially leaves looked like Eupatorium but flowers did not seem to match other thoroughworts. It may be difficult to see in the images some blossoms are pink but never fully open. One picture shows long curved, tubular growths. Seedpods?
    Answer
    Dear DavidBrezner, good morning. You have photographed a species of Epilobium (willow-herb). The seeds and details of their associated structures are the easiest way to determine which species you have. Based on the projecting sepal tips, you may have Epilobium coloratum (eastern willow-herb), but I would like to see the seeds and the hairs associated with the seeds to confirm it is not Epilobium ciliatum (fringed willow-herb). These are native members of the evening-primrose family.
  • Question
    Good afternoon Dr I have a grass growing in my yard which appears linked to my bird feeder. The characteristics seem to be split between Echinochloa sp and Sorghum sp. The ligule is membranous measuring about 1 mm. The collar appears to be glabrous. There are several culms with inflorescence. One inflorescence has awns and another does not. The florettes are covered with fine hair. The roots appear to be fibrous without rhizomes. The culms appear a bluish-green. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear califyank, it appears you have Sorghum bicolor. Echinochloa has no ligules on the upper leaves and does not have spikelets organized in pairs (with ligules in Sorghum and spikelets organized into pairs, one sessile and one paired). I hope this helps.
  • Question
    Hi! I'm back at the upper salt marsh at Joppa Flats. At first I thought this was Lamb's Quarters, which I have so much of in my garden, but when I went to Chenopodium and saw all the possibilities, I'm thinking this is Chenopodium berlandieri, based on the habitat. Am I right?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, good afternoon. Your plant certainly has the habit and look of Chenopodium berlandieri var. macrocalycium. However, I would not be able to tell you confidently without a close-up of the achenes, which have a very distinctive surface pattern, easy to see on the internet. You'll need to observe the achenes in order to be confident.
  • Question
    What kind of plant is this. It is water-logged. Not sure if I can save it. Any advice greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Twildwes, good afternoon. I'm sorry, I can't help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. While I'm happy to entertain all plant related questions, some may be outside of my area of expertise.
  • Question
    botanist. found this husky ground cherry or clammy or tomatillo. its green inside and smooth with tons of tiny seeds? what is it.live in south Georgia.
    Answer
    Dear arose4u60, there are no images associated with your message, without them I won't be able to help you. There are several species of Physalis (ground-cherry) that could be what you are describing. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    Hello, Arthur. I found this plant at the upper fringe of the salt marsh of the Merrimack estuary at Joppa Flats Education Center, Newburyport. I wanted to call it Giant Ragweed, but the leaves didn't seem to match, and the flowers/fruits didn't seem to be arranged on the spikelets the same way. So many plants in this narrow zone that you don't see elsewhere!
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, the plant you have photographed is Iva frutescens (maritime marsh-elder), a native shrub in the composite family. Great photographs, made my work much easier. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in north Jersey on a hike ..curious what it is
    Answer
    Dear Christinaroche, good morning. You've collected a species of Polygonatum (Solomon's seal), a member of the Ruscaceae. I can't tell you which species without a closer image of the leaves. Hopefully this will get your study started.
  • Question
    Hi, I was wondering if I could get some insight on my research idea, which is whether or not aloe vera plants lose vitamins or antioxidants when they get put into powder form
    Answer
    Dear jou749, powdered items have vastly increased surface area for light, heat, and oxygen to react with vitamins and antioxidants. There is little doubt that powdering would have some affect in this arena. I'm sure if you do a web search on research articles you will find studies on this supporting your idea. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, do you know which plant this is? My relative just started eating it and I want to know if it’s not toxic! It gets small white flowers on it! The flowers have 5 petals and the plant also has 5 long leaves as seen in pictures! Will really appreciate your help! The plant is located in United Kingdom, Epsom
    Answer
    Dear kinza888, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Hello, As a high school science teacher, I am always looking to pose natural phenomena questions to my students. I live in New York State, on the Sullivan and Orange County border, which is about 70 Northwest on NYC. What I'm curious about is what is causing the leaves on the trees to fall without any color change? There are many sugar maple trees and all the leaves are falling in their green state. Could it be lack of sunlight due to excessive rain and cloud cover this past month?
    Answer
    Dear KaraEllen, good morning. I wish I could help you with your question, but without being present on site it will be difficult to do so. Trees lose their leaves for a variety of reason, which include Autumn season, pests, diseases, and too much or too little water. Most times, leaf loss occurs after leaves change in some way (change color, wilt, get galls, etc.), and so this provides a clue as to why the tree is losing its leaves. Green leaves falling is more of a mystery because the symptoms of leaf fall aren't associated with any clues. Sorry I can't be of more help with this, but I would suggest contacting an arborist or cooperative extension that may have more expertise with tree issues. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good evening Arthur Again thank you for you assessment regarding C. lupulinus/grayi. The attached photo is of a bract subtending the inflorescence. I examined blades and they appeared smooth. The bract by contrast had "hook-like" cells along the lateral edges of the bract and also on the midrib. I could not find any scabrous images for comparison. The second image shows a primary and secondary inflorescence. Thank you for your expertise. I have your book, "Sedges of Maine."
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good morning. The scabrules on the margins of the involucral bract blade provide additional evidence this plant is Cyperus lupulinus, which corroborates the single, sessile spike at the summit of the stem.
  • Question
    Can you ID Populus to species just by the leaf? I'm trying to ID the species of Aphid, and I'm told each of the 20 species in the genus is specific to a specific Poplar. This is at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, NH. The tree is a young sapling, and the leaf looks most like P, deltoides (not documented in the county) and P. tremuloides, which is. I lean toward tremuloides, which is more common evidently, and seems to have leaf veins of a lighter color.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, good afternoon. I don't think this is Populus deltoides, that species has a prominent white border around the margin of the leaf lacking in this specimen. It looks more like a stump sprout leaf of Populus tremuloides, though it is sometimes hard to be confident with such leaves because they differ in shape and size for the normal leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm thinking this is Canada Hawkweed. I saw a lot of it at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, NH on September 15. Am I on the right track?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, the tall height of the capitulescence (i.e., array of flower heads) suggests this is Hieracium saboudum (Savoy hawkweed). This would be a new state record for NH (to my understanding). Any chance I can discuss with you getting a collection? If so, please email at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can help you further. Thank you.
  • Question
    Please identify this plant. It climbs up without attaching itself to anything. Thank you, Carolyn
    Answer
    Dear cstock, the plant in the image appears to be Euonymus fortunei (climbing spindle-tree). It is frequently planted and sometimes escapes cultivation. I cannot tell you whether it is native to your area or not because I don't know where the image was taken. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Location: Mendon, Ma Habitat: the edge of a pond, White blooms, Sept 15, 2018 Is there a recommended size limit for the photos? The upload process takes a long time.
    Answer
    Dear mxi2018, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Location: Mendon, Ma Habitat: edge of a pond, Yellow blossoms Sept 15, 2018
    Answer
    Dear mxi2018, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    This 3-4 foot tall plant is located in my yard in Newton, MA and I took this photo on Sept 14. Bees and butterflies are very attracted to the green closed buds. The buds seem to open not to flowers, but directly to these lovely fluffy seed heads. I've nicknamed it the truffula plant (from Dr. Seuss' The Lorax), but I'd really love to know the real name. Thanks in advance for any help you can give. (If you need to see the leaves, I can upload closeup of those, later.)
    Answer
    Dear srcassidy, good afternoon. Your plant looks like American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius), a native member of the composite family. Unfortunately, I can't see the leaves well enough to identify the plant in your image confidently, but hopefully you can research further online.
  • Question
    I was asked to identify a plant growing in an open field.Basically appears as a nuisance plant of little to no redemptive value. Field is at the base of a hill so water does drain to the edge of the field but never forms standing water, thus relatively decent drainage. This plant has covered a substantial area- 300 sq. ft. Unfortunately little to identify- no flower, no fruit. Plant currently stands about 12-15", tough stemmed. I can not key this plant. Thanks for your help.
    Answer
    Dear stevenpalmer, it looks that you have photographed Apocynum androsaemifolium (spreading dogbane). This is a native plant that is a host to the opal beetle (check out images of this beetle online, it is very beautiful). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this Spangle Gall? Will wasps be forthcoming? Taken today in Windham, NH on Oak Leaf, lakeside.
    Answer
    Dear tracyd123, this does not look like a spangle gall to me, but rather an oak leaf gall by a species of midge. If you look at images of the spangle gall online you will notice they are more flattened out and have spotting. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Sorry the image did not attach the first time. This is growing in my yard in space that is returning to nature. I have a few very odd plants growing that I have never seen
    Answer
    Dear FayD, good afternoon. It looks like you have a species of willow (genus Salix) growing in your yard. However, I would need more images from different angles to identify the species and need to learn what state you are in. Perhaps knowing the genus will get you started with your study of this plant.
  • Question
    Good Afternoon I have several species of sedge growing around my house. I was hoping that you could confirm the identity from the images posted. I believe that the sedge is Cyperus lupulinus. It was found growing in a sunny location in my garden. C. grayi seems to be similar. The achenes are triangular in cross section and measure about 2.0 mm in length. thank you in advance!
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good afternoon. Great images. I can't tell you for certain which species you have. The ascending involucral bracts suggests Carex grayi, but that species usually has several branches in the inflorescence (unless it is a depauperate specimen). If you check the margins of the bracts just beneath the spikelets, you can determine who this is (prominently scabrous on the margin is Cyperus lupulinus, smooth or nearly so is C. grayi). Hopefully this helps.
  • Question
    can't upload photo -2 or more main stems to 30" leaves with light veins in groups of 3 opposite tiny purple lipped flowers along their own long thin stems on top and at leave axle - located in hardwood forest Vermont - other plants here:wild Sarsasperilla, winter green, whirled loosestrife, indian cuke, bird on wing(?), Canadian lily of valley, false and regular solomens seal, tiger lily, wild oats, Jerusalem artichoke...
    Answer
    Dear rgvose, if you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you with your question. Be sure to include location information with the email please.
  • Question
    I'm sort of between Switch Panicgrass (Panicum virgatum) and Fall Panicgrass ( P. dichotomiflorum) on this one. (Of course, with my level of expertise, it could be neither! e.g., P. amarum) This is at the upper level of a salt marsh at Joppa Flats Ed. Center, Newburyport. Taken 7/17/18.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, good morning. Excellent photographs. Given the location, and the first habit image with spreading branches, you likely have Panicum virgatum. The later images with strict upright branches warrant attention. Is it possible to check back in on these in a week or so to identify if they still have this morphology? If so, it would be good to do this to confirm the identity. Feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org to discuss further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I photographed this plant somewhere in Czech Republic - in Kutna Hora - and i don't know what plant it is. Can you help me, please? Thanks, Mihaela
    Answer
    Dear Mihaela, good morning. I'm sorry, I can't help with this one. The Czech Republic is a long way from my region of expertise. We share some similar plants, but this one I don't recognize. You will need to locate an organization closer to you for assistance. I encourage you to find a herbarium (plant museum) to locate folks with taxonomic expertise in your area. Good luck.
  • Question
    I forgot to mention in my last submission concerning Atriplex prostrata, that the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center says it is native to Eurasia. thought you would want to know of the conflict.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, good afternoon. Unfortunately, it's not likely that simple. It is more probable, based on the history of collections, that the coastal populations are in fact native and the inland populations are introduced from Europe. This is sometimes the case that we have both native and non-native populations of the same species in New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Rome,NY. Found alongside recently disturbed farmland. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Laurie, you've photographed Phytolacca americana (American pokeweed). This is a native, robust herb that often grows in disturbed areas. It has edible shoots in the early part of the year. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Arthur, I looked at the online Gobotany Goodyera repens photos as I just saw (I believe) some for the first time and wanted to see pictures to cross written check description. It seems to me the 10th photo (Kausen's)looks more like pubescens with spiraling flowers than the other photos, one sided. Does repens also occur having spiraling flowers?
    Answer
    Dear PaSmith-Annaclette, good afternoon. It is actually hard to know for certain which species has been photographed, especially without the rest of the plant to examine. Goodyera repens does not always have a secund raceme, though that is usually the case (as you note). The labellum (lowermost petal) does have a deep, pouch-like protrusion, which supports this being as it was determined by the photographer. While not typical, it may well be Goodyera repens. I hope that is helpful.
  • Question
    Can you identify this plant - growing at South Cape Beach Mashpee, MA
    Answer
    Dear DonnaE617, the plant is Xanthium strumarium (rough cocklebur), a member of the aster family. They grow coastal and inland, most often found on shorelines. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi: This plant was growing on Mile Beach at Reid State Park in Georgetown, Maine, just below the Beach Grass. It is covered with stiff spines. What is the species?
    Answer
    Dear DonLemieux, good afternoon. You've photographed Salsola kali (saltwort), a member of the expanded amaranth family. The leaves and sepals tipped with a firm spine are good identifying characteristics for this halophyte.
  • Question
    I can't identify this plant. Would love some help. In the spring it had tiny yellow flowers at the base of the leaf stem and in groups of 3 or 4. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Carolyn, it looks like Lindera benzoin (northern spicebush), a native member of the same plant family that sassafras belongs to. If you bruise/crush a leaf, you should get a very pleasant aroma. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this plant sprouted in my backyard just over 3 weeks ago. And all of a sudden it had fruits! It’s quit pretty and I’d like to know what kind of plant/tree this might be. Thanks! I live in the Northeast (Connecticut)
    Answer
    Dear Zach 98, you've photographed Phytolacca americana (American pokeweed). It is a beautiful, native, robust herb that can be eaten (the shoots) in the very early part of the year. It will have purple fruits after the flowers mature.
  • Question
    I found this growing in my backyard. I did not plant this but the leaves reminded me of those on a ladyslipper orchid. I live in Genesee County Michigan in a suburb.
    Answer
    Dear jea9libka, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    I found this in a wet area of the woods near Caribou, ME, about the middle of July. I tried to identify it and thought it could be Northern Tubercled Bog Orchid but am not sure. Sorry about the poor quality pictures...the flowers are tiny, making them hard to photograph!
    Answer
    Dear J, you have photographed Platanthera aquilonis (north wind bog-orchid), an infrequent native orchid that is found here and there in a variety of habitats. Enjoy the flowers.
  • Question
    Hi, I submitted a question last week but I think I forgot to hit send. So I will try again. I found this plant in shallow water and just along the shore of Mooselookmeguntic Lake in Maine. I key it out as “Veronica scutellata”. Is this right and if so can this plant grow submerged in water and how deep? Thanks for your help.
    Answer
    Dear Plantperson, you are correct with your identification. This is a native, wetland and aquatic speedwell with long, narrow leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found 6 of these plants growing around a large stand of black huckleberry shrubs at the edge of a woodland of mixed hardwood trees on my property in Dover, NH. Thanks for your help.
    Answer
    Dear dLuxe55, you've photographed Chimaphila maculata (spotted prince's-pine), the white pattern on the leaves is diagnostic. This is a native member of the heath family.
  • Question
    Having a hard time identifying this shrub in my backyard in Maryland. Glossy green leaves on numerous green branches.
    Answer
    Dear Bekah1185, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be aware that Maryland is south of my region of expertise and I may not be familiar with the plant in question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this early September blooming plant on our Long Island property under dry shade/sun conditions growing in sandy soil. It stands about 4-5” tall, with flower height around 1/4”. Leaves are opposite. It’s the only specimen I’ve seen here. More photos are available if needed. Thank you for any help you can provide in identifying this plant.
    Answer
    Dear MossGal, good morning. The plant you photographed is Trichostema dichotomum (forked bluecurls), a native member of the mint family. The arching stamens are diagnostics (and quite beautiful).
  • Question
    I'm trying to decide whether this Solidago is altissima or canadensis. I believe altissima is supposed to be hairy on the undersides of the leaf on both the veins and in between. As you can see from the underside in the photo, you can see hairs all over, but only if the light is just right. I'm not sure what constitutes "hairy." This is on the edge of the parking lot at Joppa Flats Education Center, Newburyport, close to a salt marsh along the Merrimack River.
    Answer
    chaffeemonell, based on leaf pubescence and margin (low teeth), it does look like Solidago altissima. The measurements of the involucres and disk flowers are the real definitive characters. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I am located in the Hampshire County MA. I have been trying to identify this tree for some time now. It is growing next to what I believe are Buckthorns, obviously it is not the same but wondering if it could be Chokeberry? I can't find many berry photos of chokeberry tree/shrubs. This tree grows next to our road in a wide tree belt . I believe it probably gets a lot of winter salt run off. Hardy little trees. Any ideas? Thank you in advance.
    Answer
    Dear Romy, you've photographed Frangula alnus (glossy false buckthorn), a non-native and usually highly invasive species. The leaves with entire margins and arcutate veins, naked winter buds, and small fascicles of flowers that mature as fleshy fruits are some of the identifying characteristics.
  • Question
    I have an 8'foot tall plant growing in my garden. I have narrowed down the plant to be either Lactura Canadensis or Erechtites hieracifolia. The plant has a hollow stem and when you break it latex forms. I tried to find the distinguish the differences between the two types of plants I am having trouble uploading my photos. HELP!
    Answer
    Dear Eliza007, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Hi, wondering if you could identify this plant. Located in kettle pond/vernal pool in Wayland, Mass
    Answer
    Dear Sheila, you've photographed Scirpus cyperinus (common woolsedge), a native wetland species. It flowers/fruits later in the year than several of its closely related cousins.
  • Question
    Disturbed land, cleared 19 years ago for housing development. Zip 01523. There are many of these young trees, but I remember that none appeared for a few years after land was cleared, the young White Pine and Oak trees appeared sooner. Some years ago I used a tree identification book, and decided this must be Sweet Birch. Was I right?
    Answer
    Dear mweinr, it certainly does look like Betula lenta (cherry birch). I assume you received a wintergreen odor when you bruised the bark. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, including photos of a woody vine. Found on an old farm property in Wayland, Ma. I am wondering if it is bittersweet...and if so, if it is American or Oriental. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Sheila, I can't identify all of the plants in your images, but assuming they all represent the same population, you do appear to have a species of Celastrus (bittersweet). Certain details are not represented in the photographs for me to confidently tell you which species, though the crenate margins on some leaves suggest Celastrus orbiculatus (Oriental bittersweet). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Some kind of persicaria pr polygonum? I checked it against everything in those genera on GoBotany and didn't see a match with the stout purple-white cloverlike flowers, the red stems/joints, and the wide-ish leaves (sans brown thumbprints). Growing in sand along Mink Brook at the Mink Brook Nature Preserve in Hanover, NH, 1 Sept. 2018. Thanks for any help.
    Answer
    Dear mwms1916, you've photographed what appears to be Persicaria nepalensis (Nepalese smartweed), which would be a new find for NH. Please contact me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org so that we can discuss vouchering this collection (an important aspect of the discovery process). Great job with the images.
  • Question
    We have a number of these small plants suddenly appearing on our sandy Long Island property, and would love to know what they are and whether or not they are invasive. They are growing in a sunny and dry area. The leaves seem to have tiny white dots along the edges. I have not seen any flowers yet. Thank you for any help!
    Answer
    Dear MossGal, good morning. I'm sorry, without flowers I won't be able to identify this species for you with confidence. It is likely they will flower next season and you could get images for me to assist you at that time. I wish I could be of more use.
  • Question
    This was a shrub-like plant, and the flowers depicted were about 6-8 feet off the ground. Could you ID this plant for me? Boothbay Harbor, Maine 43.862691, -69.637965 Also, feel free to use this image on your website if you think it useful.
    Answer
    Dear Kurt, you've photographed Reynoutria japonica (Japanese knotweed; synonym: Fallopia japonica). This is a non-native, highly invasive herb that (as its name suggests) originated in eastern Asia. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Im am trying to id this vine growing in our garden in Kittery ME. It is opposite compound leaves With a few tiny teeth on leaf edge. I have not seen any flowers on.
    Answer
    Dear dillon_shaun@yahoo.dk, you have photographed a native species of Parthenocissus, a genus of lianas belonging to the grape family. I can't see the adhesive disks well enough, but the short petioules suggest this is Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper).
  • Question
    Sorry, I forgot to attach the photos that go with question of Veronica scutellata.
    Answer
    Dear Plantperson, I'm glad you were able to upload an image. Yes, your plant is Veronica scutellate. The narrow leaves and wetland/aquatic habit are good indicators of this species.
  • Question
    I am in the Rangeley Lake area in Maine and found this plant along the shore and in the water, I key it out to Veronica scutellata, Marsh Speedwell. Is this the correct ID? I need to submit it on a survey form for LSM (Lake Monitors of Maine) so I need to be correct. Also, does this plant grow in the water, maybe up to 2 or 3 feet deep.
    Answer
    Dear Plantperson, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Saw this plant on a hike at Rampart Reservoir in Colorado. It was on a trail above the lake in partial sunlight,near pine trees and aspen. The leaves have a velvety texture arranged in whorls and there is a cone shaped bud on top.
    Answer
    Dear vrh, my region of expertise is northeastern North America. That written, your plant looks like a species of mullein (genus Verbascum). You might try searching for more information in that genus to find out what your plant is.
  • Question
    I'm hoping you can help us in identifying this grass we have on the Joppa Flats Education Center Property, Newburyport.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, I'm sorry, I can't confidently identify the grass (in this case) without seeing it in person. It looks somewhat like Eragrostis pectinacea (tufted lovegrass), and you could check there to see if the description fits. But, if you would like, just contact me for address details and could always send it to me for a confident identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I tried identifying this roadside weed found in southern Vermont without success. It has a squarish stem which appears to be hollow and has lengthwise ridges. I didn't see it while flowering so I can't say what color the flowers were. Thank you for your help.
    Answer
    Dear lmc825, you've photographed Verbena urticifolia (white vervain), a native species that often inhabits slightly richer soils, such as those in the seasonal flood zone of rivers (though it often also is found in fields and along roadsides).
  • Question
    Two plants growing in my yard would like to know what they are this is a space reclaimed by nature for one and the purple one is growing up my deck it is wild
    Answer
    Dear FayD, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    These are growing wild in my yard along with some others that I have that I do not know what they are These are climbing
    Answer
    Dear FayD, you've photographed Apios americana (ground-nut), a native member of the legume family. It has compound leaves with (usually) 5-7 leaflets and rhizomes that bear tubers along their length.
  • Question
    Good morning, will you please identify my beautiful plant?
    Answer
    Dear Nathaniel, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    I have found what I believe is impatiens glanulifera here in Worcester, VT. But the internet does not show it as growing here. It’s in a ditch next to the (gravel) road by a culvert. Youngish forest on the other side of the ditch. The website is taking forever to upload the images, so I will email them to you.
    Answer
    Marcia, anytime you have trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to me ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will be happy to help.
  • Question
    Working on the goldenrods on the Joppa Flats property in Newburyport. Could this be S. canadensis? The teeth on the leaves of S. ulmifolia seem bigger. Not sure of the importance of the branching of the stem.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, you are certainly in the correct group. You have either Solidago canadensis or Solidago altissima, which you can separate by measuring the flower heads or examining the density and distribution of hairs on the lower side of the leaf. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Hello! I tried to figure this out myself using state of CT information but could not. This vine is growing around one of our trees in one area and now off this fence. The leaf groupings are mostly 4 leafs or 5. Leaves are shaped like cylinders. Are you able to help me identify it? We are in the NW corner of CT. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear pdc542, you've photographed Akebia quinata (chocolate-vine), a non-native member of the Lardizabalaceae. It is native to eastern Asia and is found here and there in southern New England.
  • Question
    Is this Eastern Tansy (T. huronense) ? Found in Wells Maine 08-23-2018. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear docj77, you've photographed Tanacetum vulgare (common tansy), a species that is native to the Old World. It is introduced here in there in open and/or disturbed locations in New England.
  • Question
    Hello This came out of nowhere I have been living here for 22 years North Massapequa Long Island New York. It just started growing and I have no idea what it is can you be of any assistance
    Answer
    Dear Marko916, good afternoon. You have photographed a species of Persicaria (smartweed), but I can't tell you which one without closer images of the stipules (the tubular sheaths surrounding the stems where the leaves attach to the stems and branches). If you want to upload additional photographs, I can help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A few plants were found at the summit of Mount Agamenticus on the SE corner of the Learning Lodge in York, ME. These were located next to a watering bowl for dogs and I suspect dogs were the vectors. (photo are not uploading)
    Answer
    Dear David, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    This bush is growing on the edge of the woods behind our home in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Can you ID? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear joaninmaine, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    I have lived in Maine and NH since 1950, and don't recall seeing this before. It is ~2 m tall. Lee, NH. Sorry about the cluttered background...I could take a different camera and get a better picture. If I zoom in on the center of the plant, the leaves look like they are at 90°.
    Answer
    Dear Ninetrees, you have apparently photographed a species of Cirsium (thistle), but I can't tell you which one without a closer image of the flower heads, leaves, and stems. If you want to upload or email those to me, I'm happy to help further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm unable to upload images into PlantShare. The pictures I'm looking to upload are all in the 5-6 Mb range. Do I need to reduce the size of the images?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, if you are having difficulty uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Keith Hill Orchards in Grafton, MA were the larges in New England at the turn of the 20th century. I have some old pear trees on the property that I'm trying to identify. One kind of tree is very tall, and has lots of golf ball-sized fruit each year. They are clearly not for casual consumption, but I assume there must have been a purpose for planting them. Attached is a photo of the ripe fruit from one of these trees. What variety of fruit is this, and why was it planted, what is its use?
    Answer
    Dear ben.neely1, good morning. I wish I could assist you, but Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Pear cultivars are out of my areas of expertise. I think you might want to direct this question to a University cooperative extension in regions where apple and pear cultivation might be frequent. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this a species of violet? Perennial, slowly spreads. I have not seen it flower but the opened seed head looks like a violet. Thank you! Locality average soil, partially sunny, Scarborough, Maine
    Answer
    Dera Fpolygala, hello. Yes, the leaves certainly look like they would belong to the genus Viola (violet). However, this isn't a shape that any common species possesses. Assuming we are correct with our violet hypothesis, there is a good chance this would involve Viola sagittata (arrowhead violet) as a possible parent to this individual you photographed.
  • Question
    Can "Pandanus amaryllifolius" become poisonous if grown near the drainages?
    Answer
    Dear nuhazanuz, good morning. I am unfamiliar with this plant. Pleaes remember that Go Botany is an online tool designed for wild plants of northeastern North America. Plants can accumulate environmental toxins if they grow near drainages that funnel runoff from industry, urban areas, and heavily used roads. While a drainage would not likely change a plant's acute toxicity to humans, it can become a source of toxins that contribute to the overall body burden a human must contend with.
  • Question
    By the shore of Lake Champlain in a marshy area. Alburg, VT 8/16/18 Thank you
    Answer
    Dear joshl, you've photographed a species of Stachys (hedge-nettle), likely S. palustris. The inflorescence is a little bit misleading because the top has been broken off (so don't let that confuse you when you look at other images to confirm). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Good afternoon I discovered this 'weed' growing in a disturbed area of Arlington, MA. I have tentatively identified it as Erechtites hieraciifolius primarily from the leaf structure. I would appreciate your input. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear califyank, you have determined the plant correctly as best I can tell. This species (American burnweed) is a native weed of disturbed and/or open soils. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found this on Schoodic Peninsula. Have gone through all of my flower books and can't seem to find out what it is.
    Answer
    Dear weoellers, you have photographed a fruiting individual of either Hypericum virginicum or Hypericum fraseri, most likely the latter (Fraser's St. John's-wort). These two species have been segregated in the genus Triadenum, but are not included in the genus Hypericum (so you might find them under a different name in some guidebooks). I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Central Wisconsin near river
    Answer
    Dear Patrick, sorry you are having trouble uploading images. I suggest emailing me directly for help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    River bank Central Wisconsin
    Answer
    Dear Patrick, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Found this vine strangling a stand of Joe-Pye weed by a man-made pond in my garden in Concord...Can you ID it? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Marshat, good afternoon. You've photographed a species of dodder (genus Cuscuata), a parasitic vine in the morning-glory family. Most of the time people encounter Cuscuta gronovii. These are mostly native species.
  • Question
    Just found this yesterday by a pond in Sharon, CT. What do you think it is?
    Answer
    Dear Jbrine1, your plant is Penthorum sedoides (ditch-stonecrop). It is a native member of the Penthoraceae, found on shorelines, in ditches, and other wet places.
  • Question
    I think this plant is Malva alcea. So far have found two. They are in Atkinson, NH. 7 Crown Hill Road. Please confirm ID. Thank You, John Williams jw@jwlw.net
    Answer
    Dear jwlwjw, good morning. I would love to help you with your question, but the flower images are not clear and I can't see the necessary details. If you could acquire in-focus images, I would likely be able to help you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I’m trying to determine if this is false bindweed or what it may be if it is not. It is very close to the ground and is a vine. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Carterj519, you have photographed false bindweed (genus Calystegia), a member of the morning-glory family. I can't tell you which species because I cannot see the sepals and leaf blades well enough. If you have additional images of those parts, feel free to post them and I can assist further.
  • Question
    Spotted July 26th on a coastal rock ledge in Boot Head Cove Preserve, Trescott, ME. Best wishes and thanks ahead of time. Kathy Crawford
    Answer
    Dear kcrawford, you have photographed Nabalus trifoliolatus (three-leaved rattlesnake root; formerly known by the name Prenanthes trifoliolatus). It is a native plant that is found in forests, on riverbanks, and in open, exposed situations.
  • Question
    Saw July 26th, growing in the crack of a huge rock ledge off a trail at Boot Head Cove Preserve, Trescott, ME.
    Answer
    Dear kcrawford46, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Hi. I’m trying to upload a photo to go with my profile AND to accompany my sighting of partridge sensitive-pea at McDowell lake in Peterborough NH. Hillsboro county- which is no documented as in this county in GoBotany. The download image keeps twirling around and never completes the download. Any suggestions as to what I’m doing wrong?
    Answer
    Dear rayban19, the website is giving some folks trouble uploading images. Feel free to email me the images directly as ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can make sure these images support a new county record on the taxon page for this species. Thank you.
  • Question
    Sir, please its a humble request to you that please identify my plants and send me the names of these plants.... i shall be very thankfull to you...
    Answer
    Dear muhammedanas9797, good afternoon. There are no images associated with your question, without which I won't be able to assist. If you are having trouble uploading the images, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newnenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you. Please keep in mind Go Botany is a website designed for wild plants of northeastern North America (United States and adjacent Canada).
  • Question
    Hi Again, I found this plant growing in a parking lot next to railroad tracks in Kendall Square Cambridge, MA. The area is very sunny. The photos were taken the last week of July. Any thoughts on what this plant is? It was recently uprooted by third parties so I never got a chance to see what the flowers would have looked like. I tried to upload to the website but couldn't get it to take the photos. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear BrooklineBiker, there are no images associated with your question. Feel free to email me directly. I am here to help in any way I can with your identification questions.
  • Question
    Hi, What is this plant found about 20 feet from a pond in the Middlesex Fells on August 12? The area was generally shaded but could be considered an edge area. I'm emailing the photos offline because the website won't accept my upload. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear BrooklineBiker, anytime you can't upload the images, feel free to email me directly. We are working on repairing the issue that is preventing some folks from uploading images. Thank you.
  • Question
    I need help identifying a Carex sp. The perigynea are at the terminal end of a long culm. The culm measures about 70 cm. I noticed teeth along either side of the perigynium. The vegetative leaves measured about 30 cm long and 2 mm wide. The leaf has a prominent v shape with a distinct mid-leaf vein. The location is my garden in Malden MA. Thank you in advance.
    Answer
    Dear califyank, you have likely collected Carex vulpinoidea (common fox sedge), a native species that inhabits marshes, meadows, and ditches (i.e., soils that are usually at least seasonally wet). It is found in both pristine and disturbed wetlands.
  • Question
    After dealing with a Family illness out of state and significant rainfall received over the last few weeks... Family members returned (Southern New Hampshire) to find quite a few of these weeds growing up fast in their backyard some over 3 feet tall... With all the Hogweed scare going around they are more than a little freaked out. If anyone could identify this weed(s) it would be most helpful. Thanks, -mike-
    Answer
    Dear HighlanderNH, you've photographed Erechtites hieraciifolia (American burnweed), a native member of the composite family that is often found in disturbed and/or open soils. This plant is usually not responsible for any dermatitis (in fact, it is edible, but fairly strong of flavor so most don't enjoy it). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is a followup to a question I asked back in early spring about some willows on my property. Instead of one or two species, I have identified eight (possibly nine) species of willow, I have identified silky willow, prairie willow, heart-leaved willow, bog willow and eared willow, these three I haven't yet been able to identify. I was thinking that the one on the left is bebb willow, while the center image is heart-leaved but their leaves have characteristics that those species don't. NW CT
    Answer
    Dear JoshuaH, good morning. Willows are not easy by photograph, and I would need multiple photographs of each willow you want me to identify. I need to see the upper and lower surface of the leaves, and learn if we are viewing a tree or shrub. I really enjoy willows and want to help you, but need some more information. Also, I'm happy to have you send me a specimen of the willows you need identified. You could mail me a pressed clipping and I could give you a more confident answer. Feel free to discuss with me using the email ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org.
  • Question
    Hello, I found some ladies'-tresses in a field in Middlesex County Massachusetts. I am unsure which species they are. The photo of the leaves is not very good, they are very narrow. Thank you for your help!
    Answer
    Dear Lianabirdd, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    I discovered a wild flower in my flower garden in Midlothian, Va, suburb of Richmond, Va. It appears close to a great masterwort but uncertain. Currently, it is in a shade-area with much moisture, about 5 feet tall and 3 feet width. Please respond with name or verification so I may research how to care and propagate. Thank you for your consideration.
    Answer
    Dear Vince, good afternoon. You appear to have photographed a species of Tarenaya (spider-flower). One species that is often observed is Tarenaya hassleriana (giant spider-flower). I would check images of that species to see how close this initial hypothesis is. Best wishes.
  • Question
    We noticed this tree/shrub on the edge of the Joppa Flats Ed Center property in Newburyport. It looked similar to cherries, except the venation of the leaves seemed different. We wonder if it might be some volunteer invasive exotic.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, without seeing this shrub "in person", I can't be confident; however, it does look like a member of the genus Prunus (plum, cherry). The petioles have a pair of extrafloral nectaries (i.e., glands), just like in our native cherries. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! I need help identifying a plant that is past flowering and all I have left is foliage and seed heads. The foliage is low growing and grass-like. We moved to a new Home in Tyngsboro, MA and I’m not sure what this is.
    Answer
    Dear eantanavica, good morning. Unfortunately, I can't help you with the plant. It is a member of the Caryophyllaceae (carnation family), but without flowers, I can't assist--and it may be a planted species? If you get images of the flowers next season, please send them my way so I can assist.
  • Question
    Is this invasive Autumn olive (Elaeagnus spp)? If it is, do you have any tips to remove it?
    Answer
    Dear SunnyMona, Yes, you have found Elaeagnus umbellata (autumn-olive), a species native to Asia. It can be aggressive and is capable of rapid reproduction. It's removal is difficult because it can sprout back from cuttings. Often, unfortunately, herbicide is the only route (when plants have grown enough that they cannot be pulled). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm growing a mango from seed, it had sprouted and I decided to transfer it into a bigger pot, the plant itself sorda... snapped away from the seed, will it still survive without it's huge seed or was that it's main source of nutrients? It already has a large root, and leaves, should I plant the seed near it or what?
    Answer
    Dear Zahracar18, I can't answer your question with certainty, but if the leaves and roots are established on the new shoot, it is likely your plant will do just fine. Good luck.
  • Question
    Hello sir, I am an environmental engineer working on Air Pollution reduction by Trees. I wanted to know that - how the absorbed gases such carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, volatile organic carbons by the trees are measured. Is there any method or any device for such measurement.
    Answer
    Dear mousmi, good morning. There are methods for the measure of such things, but these questions enter the realm of plant physiology, which is outside of my realm of expertise. For that, I'm sorry. I would encourage you to locate a professor of plant physiology at a university and direct this question to them. Good luck.
  • Question
    Hi, we have an old-fashioned Hydrangea arborescens cultivar. We don't think it's Annabelle because the blooms are not large enough. They get to be 4'-5" across at the most. Another possibility is H. arborescens 'Grandiflora'. Any thoughts?
    Answer
    Dear Jbrine1, good afternoon. I'm sorry that I cannot help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants, and many questions related to cultivars I would not be able to assist with. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Need help to identify this plant, what could this small weird plant be, I got it from a nursery. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear @fr189561, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help this time. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern US. While we are happy to entertain all plant-related questions, some species originate in areas distant to our region of expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is in bloom now, July 26, 2018, near woody wet area. Very fragrant, white flowers, leaves have teeth. Having trouble identifying - looks like a prunus
    Answer
    Dear mxi2018, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hi again. What do you suppose this fern is? It's hard to see in my pictures, but the leaves are double tapering. The longest ones are maybe 1.5'-2'. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Jbrine1, as best I can tell from the image, it appears to be Deparia acrostichoides (silvery false spleenwort). It is a species that has both hairs and scales on the petiole and elongate indusia, as shown in your images.
  • Question
    Sightings Weds, 25 Jul 18, at Hamilton Cove Preserve, Trescott, Maine. First five images are of the same plant emerging from a crevice of rock ledges and slabs. Next images are, I believe, the same plant but a white flower variation. These last two photos are from the same specimen along the "meadow" path that departs the rocky beach. Thanks ahead of time!
    Answer
    Dear kcrawford, you have two different species of mint in your photographs. Those with a white flower are Galeopsis tetrahit (brittle-stemmed hemp-nettle), and those with pink flowers are Galeopsis bifida (split-lipped hemp-nettle). These are non-aromatic mints that originate from Europe. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello ~ I have keyed-out a plant to Agalinus paupercula, small-flowered agalinus. However, I noticed my sample has a wonderful minty scent, quite strong, yet this attribute is not mentioned for any species in the genus. It would be very helpful to know whether or not Agalinus has a mint scent. Perhaps I need to keep digging! Cheers, Atom
    Answer
    Dear Atom, good morning. Your plant isn't small-flowered agalinis, this is because the flowers are stalked (without stalks in this species) and the leaf blades are too broad. You appear to have a species in the mint family, but I can't tell you which one without location information (this is really critical for plant identification). If you can provide that, I may be able to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I would like to know the identity of the uploaded image. It is tall plant with asymmetric lancelot leaves. It looks to be about a week or two before the flowers bloom. Thank you in advance.
    Answer
    Dear califyank, the plant in your image is a species of Lactuca (lettuce). It is most likely Lactuca canadensis (tall lettuce), a species native to the northeast. It will usually produce yellow flowers.
  • Question
    I think this is Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata) found in Sanford Maine growing along the edge of a pond today. It does not appear in the database of Maine wildflowers. Could you help with ID? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear docj77, the plant in your photographs is indeed Verbena hastata (blue vervain). It is a relatively common species along shorelines and in some marsh habitats. It is documented from Maine. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have these wild orchids all over the property, and I love them. More and more grow every year. Are they rare? I think they areDactylorhiza viridis. Is this correct?Sorry, the image will only load sideways for some reason. Thank you. Ellen
    Answer
    Dear eyenawine, good morning. The plant in your images is Epipactis helleborine (broad-leaved helleborine), a non-native (but non-invasive) orchid from Europe. It has become relatively common in the northeast over the past few decades. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, this is in my yard in Lawrence, Massachusetts... can you tell me what it is?
    Answer
    Dear NaniWane, you've photographed Lobelia inflata (bladder-pod lobelia, also called Indian-tobacco), a native species that often grows in open and human-disturbed locations.
  • Question
    Two different, yet similar trees. Both found on wetland margins. One is more shrub-like in its growth form. Possibly salix? First three images are one tree, second three are the next tree. thanks so much you guys are incredible!!!!
    Answer
    Dear jmckenzie96, I can help you with one of these, but the other is lacking items I would need to see. The first species appears closest to Salix cinerea, a non-native species with prominent, elongate ridges under the bark. To see this, the bark can be removed so that the wood is observed on two and three year old branches. The second one appears to be Salix humilis, but I don't have a view of the underside to be certain. If you want to send additional images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I'm happy to continue this discussion.
  • Question
    Taken July 12 in West Bridgewater, MA, couldn't ID
    Answer
    Dear massecology, you've photographed what appears to be Mirabilis nyctaginea (heart-leaved umbrella-wort), a member of the Nyctaginaceae. This plant is the most commonly observed member of the genus in New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Photographed Weds, 18 Jul, 2018 at Reversing Falls Park, Pembroke, Maine. On rocky ledges with lowbush blueberries.
    Answer
    Dear Kathy, as your surmised, your plant is cowwheat (Melampyrum lineare). It is a native, hemiparasitic species in the Orobanchaceae. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is this Heracleum maximum? June 25, Coos Co, NH, near a lake. Hand 8" for reference
    Answer
    Dear massecology, yes, the plant you've photographed looks like Heracleum maximum. I can't see details of the flowers and inflorescence close enough to be certain, but the plant aspect is correct for this species.
  • Question
    Stumped by this one, spotted in N. New Hampshire on a lower elevation trail.
    Answer
    Dear WMNF, you've photographed Circaea alpina (dwarf enchanter's-nightshade), a native member of the Onagraceae. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Sorry had trouble loading photos, not sure what got thru... there were 3; anyway these are in wet meadow in Maine, Wells Reserve
    Answer
    Dear MAnnaclette, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    In my friend’s garden in Texas. She didn’t plant it and it’s growing among her pepper plants.
    Answer
    Dear Planter, the plant you photographed appears to be a species of Physalis (ground-cherry), a member of the nightshade family. I cannot tell you which species because Texas is a long way from my region of expertise. I hope this helps you start learning about this plant.
  • Question
    I live in Salem Oregon. These plants came up with my other perennials in my flower bed. Can you help me identify it?
    Answer
    Dear lhendrick, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please keep in mind, Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America, so I may not have the answer for you (but can help you locate someone who might).
  • Question
    I have been trying to identify this orchid. It is growing in our brook (Temple, Maine). Mature, deciduous forest. Approximately 12 inches high, no odor.
    Answer
    Dear bcollins357, you've photographed Platanthera aquilonis (north wind bog-orchid). This is an uncommon, but widely located orchid in Maine. You will find it usually referred to as Platanthera hyperborea in older literature, but that species is restricted to Greenland (i.e., that name was used too inclusively). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I’m in Mount Vernon, Maine (kennebec county) and have been seeking cramp bark - viburnum opulus. Found this plant, not currently flowering or putting out berries. Wondering if it is cramp bark...? Or something else?
    Answer
    Dear Laura, you've photographed Acer pensylvanicum (striped maple). While these two species share similarities, such as opposite and palmately lobed leaves, Viburnum opulus has stipules at the base of the leaves, lacks longitudinal stripes on the bark, and has a different fruit. I hope this helps.
  • Question
    My wetland meadow in NW CT has a number of loosestrifes, but I'm not sure which type I have. They appear to be purple loosestrife, but it's not an aggressive invader, it's been here for several decades and has never really taken off, I only have around two dozen plants in a five acre wetland. Their size doesn't seem to fit with purple loosestrife from what I've read of it, the tallest ones are around the same height as that native goldenrods. I can easily control them if that's what they are.
    Answer
    Dear JoshuaH, while there are other species of Lythrum that occur in New England, including some native species, your plant does appear to be Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife). I've seen it not be terribly invasive in some wetlands before, though it is difficult to predict its behavior in one or more decades when it becomes more established.
  • Question
    Hello here are herbs that are in my yard that I have been unable to identify. Could you help me determine what they are? Thank you. This purple flower blooms from around May to around August
    Answer
    Dear julianmoran, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were observed.
  • Question
    Here's a snapshot of the entire tree (or large shrub), and a snapshot of one branch. Every year, it grows ordinary fruit tree leaves on the old wood, then it flowers, and makes fruit. And then the new wood grows out, and it grows lobed leaves on the new wood. This is rather unusual. The photo of the entire tree is a little misleading, since I just cleaned up underneath, and trimmed the periphery of the lower portion of the tree. Northern Worcester County, in a residential yard.
    Answer
    Dear mweinr, I'm sorry I cannot help you with your question. The photographs are not close enough for me to see the details I need. If you want to try sending closer taken images to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I can try to assist you.
  • Question
    Landlord found this growing in his yard. When you rub the leaves it smells a bit like burnt rubber but we don't think it's a rubber plant. What is it?
    Answer
    Dear jjbean, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location where you observed the plant.
  • Question
    This weed/plant appears to bear fruit and could possibly be in the nightshade family? It looks like a tiny tomatillo. It lives in Vermont on the edge of the woods in an area that receives direct sunlight in the morning, but is shaded all afternoon and is on the side of a mountain. Not sure about the roots? The plant in the pictures is about 20 inches long.
    Answer
    Dear dropiedan, you've photographed Silene vulgaris (bladder campion), a member of the Caryophyllaceae. It has been known by the name Silene cucubalus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, I’m trying to identify a plant that is growing in my flower/vegetable garden. I started looking into what it might be mostly because I want to know if it is a weed I need to pull or something that I should let grow. I live in New Haven CT. I’ve looked at the key on the website and I think I may have a pussy willow, but I’m not sure. Can you help me ID this plant?
    Answer
    Dear aswatt, good morning. You've photographed a species of Persicaria (smartweed). I can't tell you which species without flowers and close-up image of the stipules (where the leaves attach to the stem), but hopefully knowing the genus will get you started. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I believe this is Menyanthes Trifoliata (buckbean or bog bean), found in one spot along the boardwalk at the Philbrick Cricenti Bog in New London, NH.
    Answer
    Dear mwms1916, yes, it looks as though you have indeed photographed Menyanthes trifoliata. Nice image of the colony.
  • Question
    We have a woody stemmed broad leaf vine that’s been growing on a trellis at our house for 50 plus years. We are doing a porch project and need to trim it back BUT don’t want to harm it. Can you tell us what it is so we can research trimming it?
    Answer
    Dear M.hartnett, it looks like you may have the liana Isotrema macrophyllum (large-leaved Dutchman's pipe; formerly known by the scientific name Aristolochia macrophylla). It is a well known liana that is grown frequently, so you should find lots of information on this species.
  • Question
    I was wondering if anyone could help me identify these two plants?
    Answer
    Dear Tiffanymarie, good morning. I can't help you with the identification of these plants because I don't know where they are from. Location is a really important aspect of plant identification as it helps to narrow down the possible choices. If you can share with me details such as location and habitat, I can try to assist you. Feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org.
  • Question
    Hi there, Is this possibly cyperus retrorsus? It's in my backyard in a residential neighborhood in Hampshire County MA. There are other similar plants, but this was the only one with cylindrical inflorescences? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear betula112, good morning. You've photographed the fruiting spike of the genus Carex (sedge). This is likely Carex lurida (sallow sedge), a common native species found in a variety of habitats.
  • Question
    Found in Trescott, Maine, July, Thurs, 19 Jul 2018, at the Bog Brook Cove Preserve, North parking lot, on Ridge Trail extension. Only plant sighted. Blooming part of upper stem missing from the end of all stem stalks!!! Kathy Crawford kcrawford46 @yahoo.com Disregard previous inquiry. Found out it's , common name, Cow wheat.
    Answer
    Dear Kathy, you've photographed pink lady's-slipper (Cypripedium acaule) after the flowers have dropped off. In this individual, the fruits haven't yet developed. Best wishes.
  • Question
    found this shrub in a cranberry bog on marthas vineyard, both on the dry outskirts and within the bog. Leaves do not have a scent and are thick and waxy. below are new leaves and the bark. any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear jmckenzie96, it appears you have photographed Baccharis halimifolia (eastern false willow), a native member of the Asteraceae. I would have expected this image to come from the upper zone of a salt marsh (at forested edge), but it can tolerate some disturbance and get away from the immediate coastline sometimes. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Found in Northern NH, mixed N. Hardwoods forest along a stream. Possibly Botrychium oneidense?
    Answer
    Dear WMNF, you've photographed Botrychium multifidum. The division of the trophophore, especially near the apex of the segments, is more so than in Botrychium oneidense. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Been spotting this plant everywhere but can't seem to identify it. It doesn't always have this purple hue to it. I've seen it all over massachusetts: roadsides, wetlands, seaside. is it a solidago? doesn't seem to have flowers but maybe it is too early to see them. I've seen it grow to be about waist height.
    Answer
    Dear jmckenzie96, I can't identify your plant with confidence, but two species come to mind. One is Hieracium kalmia (Kalm's hawkweed), but this species usually has abundant, stiff, spreading hairs on the leaves. Another is Eurybia radula (rough wood-aster). Check those two species as your plant is likely one of them.
  • Question
    I found this grass along the dunes in Aquinnah, MA as well as wetland margins. I thought it might be switchgrass but I haven't been seeing the thicker leaves associated with switchgrass. Any ideas?
    Answer
    Dear jmckenzie96, you've photographed Avenella flexuosa (wavy hair grass; synonym: Deschampsia flexuosa). This is a native grass of rocks, ledges, balds, sandy openings, and (sometimes) shorelines.
  • Question
    Collected this a few years ago in conifer litter (maritime spruce-fir forest), Vinalhaven. I've never seen it in flower so cannot key it out. Single leaf with a bulb. What do you think?
    Answer
    Dear Javier, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    I'm wondering if anyone can help identify this berry plant I found, it looks very similar to red currant but not sure about the "hairy" berries. I found them in Northwestern Ontario Canada in an old cut block.
    Answer
    Dear Lucie6232, good morning. You've photographed Ribes glandulosum (skunk currant), a native shrub with edible fruits. The hairs on the fruits have glands at the apex, which is a diagnostic trait for this species.
  • Question
    I got a pic of this plant from one of my brothers from back home that was giving to him by an old lady staring that is a miraculously cancer curative and it was used by this ancient civilization called "Zapotecas". Could you please help me to find the name of it and where can I find it or where is it native of or where could I get it. I live in CA what is call the Central Valley a dry and hot during summer. Thank you very much.
    Answer
    Dear GuadalupeKayhan, I'm sorry, I wish I could assist you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. Plants from distant countries are often unknown to me. While I'm happy to entertain any plant related question, I may not be familiar with species from afar. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This was found along the shores of the Hudson river north of Warrensburg NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed a species of Eutrochium (Joe-pye weed), a native member of the Asteraceae. I can't tell you for certain which species you have from the image that has been supplied, but I hope knowing the genus will get you started with your identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This is low groundcover is not uncommon in the woods of southern Vermont, but I don't remember ever seeing it bloom. Can you recognize it?
    Answer
    Dear LittleWindham, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you
  • Question
    I have been puzzling over this aspen. The size of the leaves seems closer to P. tremuloides, but the size and number of the teeth seem closer to P. grandidentata. It is growing in a wooded area in the center of Connecticut. What do you think?
    Answer
    Dear hlbleaf, I can't be certain from the images you've provided, but you may have collected Populus X smithii (the hybrid of P. grandidentata and P. tremuloides). The hybrid typically shows more teeth per margin than yours is displaying, but the leaf blade shape and other features suggest this identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you identify our tree please. It has only flowered twice in over thirty years. It's huge
    Answer
    Dear Lynn-Richard, there are no images associated with your message. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hi! This grass was found in a forested wetland along a slow moving stream in S.E. CT. It is approx 2ft in height. The grass was loosely clumped and is common in the region. Also do you have any good recommendations on grass references/guides. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, From the images provided, it looks like Glyceria striata (fowl manna grass). Start there with your confirmation and let me know if it doesn't seem correct.
  • Question
    We've been seeing these plants/flowers, on our upper Mountain Slope, in the Bighorn Mountains, west of Kaycee, Wyoming.
    Answer
    Dear kayceecowgirl, I'm sorry, in this case, I can't help you. Go Botany is a resource dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. You are positioned quite some distance from my region of expertise. There are resources closer to you that I can help you connect with. If this would be useful to you, email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I'll provide some contacts. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this group of leaves in Easton CT. Along a sunny open trail. It looks like a grape leaf but what are these strange red spikes all over it?
    Answer
    Dear gingerbread, you've photographed galls on the leaf. The species is called grape tube gallmaker (Schizomyia viticola), a species of midge. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Any idea what this is? It's growing out of several cut trunks on my property (cut by previous owner). The trunk is shooting out lots of these (suckers?) quickly... they grow back up to this size just a couple of weeks after cutting them back. Location: Lawrence, Massachusetts
    Answer
    Dear NaniWane, it appears you have a species of Catalpa (also known by the common name catalpa), a member of the trumpet-creeper family. These species has whorled leaves, with 1 in the whorl being larger or smaller than the other two. I don't know if this characteristic will show up sprouts, but it present on normal branches.
  • Question
    Hi - what is this? thanks!
    Answer
    Dear pevco, you've photographed a species of Campanula. It looks like C. trachelium (nettle-leaved bellflower). I can't see the lower leaves well enough to be confident, but the flowers appear to be this species.
  • Question
    These vines seems to be invasive as they are everywhere and coming out of the ground of the lawn itself. Is it bittersweet? Honeysuckle?
    Answer
    Dear NaniWane, yes, you've photographed Celastrus orbiculatus (Oriental bittersweet). Notice that the leaves are alternate (in honeysuckle they would be opposite). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, this fern was found on dry upland,in an oak pine forest in SE CT. It was 3ft in ht. The fronds are clumped, sori were straight and cream colored. The stipe is green with dark brown scales and grooved. The vascular bundle is U shaped. I thinking its Athyrium filix-femina; but the stipe is green (not dark brown or straw colored). Last Sept. the sori were dark brown. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, The fern appears to be Athyrium angustum (northern ladyfern). The dark scales on the petiole are typical of this species. Petiole colors are not always typical until the plant stops growing (i.e., many are green initially in the early part of the growing season). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! I live in the state of Michigan, USA. I have a small garden in my backyard in which I grow several vegetables and everbearing red raspberries. I have lived here for 26 years, and have moved my garden a handful of times to best utilize sunlight. My question is, after many years of my raspberry bushes producing red berries would they all of a sudden produce a yellow berry? Thank you for your time!
    Answer
    Dear tymaxem, I can't answer your question with confidence, but there is a recessive gene that is involved in the production of anthocyanins, which are pigments that make raspberries red. Raspberries that lack the genes to produce red pigments end up being yellow. Looks delicious.
  • Question
    This was found near the shore of a small lake north of Lake Desolation NY Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntia, you've photographed a species of St. John's-wort (genus Hypericum). Unfortunately, the images are from angles that don't allow me to see necessary details of the flower required for determination. I'm sorry I can't tell you which species this is.
  • Question
    located in an overgrown meadow. Western Connecticut.
    Answer
    Dear gingerbread, You've photographed Cotinus coggygria (European smoketree), a non-native member of the cashew family. It is not invasive, and is frequently grown as an ornamental in New England.
  • Question
    This is a small woody plant I found growing in the shade under a white pine in a woodsy area of our property on Cape Cod. The leaves are alternately arranged and the largest ones are about 6-7 inches in length. It seems the leaf shape with the sharply acuminate tip should be distinctive but I am having trouble keying it out. I have included photos of the leaf, the plant form, and a blurry one that shows the color of the bark. (Sorry, I don't have a real camera!) Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear cmcetta, I'm unsure of what species you have photographed, but it may be a non-native species of Prunus (cherry, plum). There are some species with the characteristic shape you have captured in your images. Without a physical specimen, I don't think I can help this time.
  • Question
    Hi Botanist: I am intrigued by this plant. It has a very small, fuzzy orchid like flower on a tall +/- 3' spire. the leaves at the top are a single blade, and become more complex and lanced (palmated? not sure of the correct term) in more mature leaves toward the base of the plant. Here are a couple of images. I am looking now and thinking. Its this just another variety of Mugwort!!! Having a hard time uploading two photos. Perhaps one was the limit. Olivia Georgia
    Answer
    Dear OliviaGeorgia, there are no images associated with you question. Without images, I won't be able to assist. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Please be sure to provide the location of the plants, this is crucial information. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I see this every spring in the shady roadside/steamside of our land in Chelsea VT. ~1100 feet. (I worry, every year that it is parsnip but Parsnip is blooming in the sun and has an edged stem.) This plant has almost an oak like leaf and the stem is straight and SMOOTH. No fruit or flowers that I can discern.
    Answer
    Dear mlynch4@cloud.com, you have photographed the leaves of Lactuca biennis (tall blue lettuce), a native species in the composite family. This plant can grow very tall (several meters) when conditions are correct.
  • Question
    Yellow False Crown Vetch? Found in CNY
    Answer
    Dear downeasb28, you've photographed what I believe is Lotus corniculatus (garden bird-foot-trefoil). This is a non-native member of the legume family that is found in open, often disturbed habitats.
  • Question
    This tiny flower was found in a wet meadow near North Creek NY Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed Oenothera perennis (little evening-primrose). This is a native species that looks quite different from most of the more robust species in the genus that many are familiar with. If you look at the ovary, you will see wing angles that helps to identify this group of evening-primroses.
  • Question
    I located this orchid growing amongst Round-leaved Sundew and Marsh St. John's Wort on a floating sphagnum covered log in Rumney, NH. My sense is that it's Pogonia ophioglossoides (Rose Pogonia). Would you concur? The plant does have the single clasping leaf halfway up the stem described on your website for P. ophioglossoides. If this attribute and photo isn't enough to be decisive as to the species, are there any other confirmatory details I should be looking for?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, yes, you've photographed Pogonia ophioglossoides. This native orchid frequents organic-soil wetlands (such as the fen you found it growing in).
  • Question
    I found this very attractive shrub at the edge of an outlet stream for a flood control dam in Wentworth, NH. There are 3 or 4 distinct plants 6 to 8 feet tall, all with alternating shiny (what might be described as leathery) leaves, 5-part flowers and red berries. Could this be Frangula alnus a known invasive?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, yes, you have photographed Frangula alnus (glossy false buckthorn). Beautiful images, thank you for sharing them here.
  • Question
    I've been trying to upload photos the past couple of days, but when I click on "upload," the wheel just keeps spinning around. Is this temporary, or is there a trick around the problem? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear chafeemonell, I'm sorry to read you are having trouble uploading images. While there are some folks who can't upload pictures, many are doing so without issue (so I don't understand why some can't yet). In the meantime, send your images to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you with your questions.
  • Question
    I got some bonzai seeds from a friend but after planting them it clearly doesn't look like bonzai leaves do me. It's growing at a decent pace with just a few hours of direct sunlight and water when the vase's plate is empty. It's currently located in Portugal. I searched in Simple Key but couldn't find a plant with similar leaves. What plant is this?
    Answer
    Dear XanaRaquel, I'm sorry that I cannot identify your plant with confidence. Cultivated species are not within my realm of expertise (Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants). That all written, it looks to be a tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicon).
  • Question
    This was found in a peat marsh near Lake Desolation NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, it looks as though you have photographed Epipactis helleborine (helleborine orchid), a non-native orchid that has become much more common in the past couple of decades in the northeast. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This vine was found in Saratoga NY on a sandy road side. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've collected a species in the grape family, as evidenced by the tendrils opposite the leaves. However, without flowers or fruits, I can't tell you which species you've collected. Sorry I cannot help further this time.
  • Question
    Hello! Can someone tell me what plant this is? I see it while hiking along streams all the time. I think it has small orange flowers toward the end of the summer. When I was a kid, a camp counselor told me Native Americans would use the sap to make yellow dye to paint their faces (he might have been wrong...) Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Garret, the plant in the photograph is a species of Impatiens (touch-me-not), likely Impatiens capensis (spotted touch-me-not), a native species of moist to wet soils. The fruits explosively open to eject the seeds.
  • Question
    Hello, This plant is growing on my property at the edge of the woods bordering the lawn/garden. It is in a semi-shady spot in the understory. It's about 5-6 feet tall. Location is Princeton, MA. Do you know what it is and if it's an invasive species? The key led me to a privet but I'm not sure that I'm interpreting correctly. Thank you so much!
    Answer
    Dear LisaB, good morning. I would love to assist you but the image uploaded is too small for me to see any details. If you have a larger one, feel free to send it to my email address at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. The plant could be a species of Ligustrum (privet), but I need a higher resolution image to be sure.
  • Question
    Can you tell what type of berry plant this is and if it's one of the invasive species, such as himalayan blackberry. It is growing at the edge of a woods on my property in Princeton, MA. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear LisaB, your image does not look like the invasive species you note. Those plants have a different inflorescence architecture. That written, I can't see much of the plant, so I can't tell you with confidence which species you have photographed, only that from what I can it appears to be a native species.
  • Question
    Can you please identify this plant. Found in Central Ontario. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Susie, good morning. I can't identify your plant with confidence. I see a wooden fence in the background, which suggests this plant may be cultivated. My realm of expertise is for wild plants. If you can let me know if the plant is question is wild or cultivated it could assist. Feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    Hey, i have this tree?? in my garden and i have no idea what it is! it attracts so many bees (hundreds) on a daily basis i want to know what it is so that i can buy and plant more of these. Thanks in advance Lisa
    Answer
    Dear lisa26486, there are no images associated with your question. If you are having trouble uploading them, fee free to attach the images to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hello! I've moved to a new property recently and am working to identify what is growing. I'm particularly concerned with removal of invasives. While taking out several large burning bush shrubs, I noticed these little plants (seedlings?) growing on the ground near the shrubs but also under a large shagbark tree of some sort and under a few large pines. It's a semi to mostly shady area where I found these growing. Location is Princeton, MA. Do you know what they are? Thank you! Lisa
    Answer
    Dear LisaB, the solitary leaves with a small, heart-shaped base are Maianthemum canadense (Canada-mayflower), a native species in the same genus as false Solomon's seal. This is a very common species in New England.
  • Question
    Hello, this plant is located in the Merrill Whipple Preserve in Coventry RI 02893. I've been unable to identify it with searches in several native plant books and plant identifying sites on the computer. it has a light airy look about it. It is growing very close to a tree. I appreciate your assistance. Thank You, joyce
    Answer
    Dear jpelletier, you have photographed Thalictrum pubescens (tall meadow-rue), a native member of the crowfoot family. This is a common species of shorelines, forest seeps, and wetlands.
  • Question
    Are there any particular plants (especially from Cape Cod or northern VT) that you are looking for photos for? I volunteer at the MBLWHOI Herbarium and my Husband and I take lots of photos on the botany club walks. Pam P. suggested I might upload some things. cknox
    Answer
    Dear cknok, good morning. Thank you for your generous offer. We do have image needs, but need to organize the effort to collect such images and process them for use on Go Botany. I suggest you contact Bill Brumback (bbrumback@newenglandwild.org) to identify how you can assist with this effort. Thank you again.
  • Question
    Can you name this flower/plant? Freeport, NY
    Answer
    Dear Richard1124, there are no images associated with your question. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hello, I have this in a wooded shady place but do not know what it is. It seeems was o not be doing so will. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear Architect, I can't help you with your question because I don't know where these plants were photographed. Location is a vitally important part of the identification process. That written, it looks somewhat similar Maianthemum stellatum (starry false Solomon's-seal). You might start there with your study.
  • Question
    Hi Sir, This isn't any plant I've found wild, but one my brother-in-law brought me from Florida. It had a leaf on it and that died about a year ago. It hasn't done anything since then and I was going to throw it away. All of the sudden it started shooting out those weird root like things and sprouted what looks like the start of some leaves! I was just wondering if you had any idea what this darn thing is?! Thanks dor your help.
    Answer
    Dear Peaches, good morning. I wish I could assist you with the identification, but I can't. The aerial roots look like those I've seen in some cultivated orchids. It appears your plant is still alive and I wouldn't discard it just yet! Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can anyone can identify this plant/flower. Freeport, NY
    Answer
    Dear Richard1124, there are no images associated with your question, without them I cannot assist you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email using the address ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Hi, I am wondering what the reasons may by that my hydrangeas have not bloomed for the last two years. They have bloomed profusely in the past, but have only slowly leafed out this year and last. They are a lace leaf variety, by the way. Should I replace them? They look pretty healthy otherwise. Thank you in advance. Celia D
    Answer
    Dear celiadoremus, I'm sorry that I cannot answer your question. Cultivated species are a topic that sits outside of the realm of Go Botany. I have observed the very phenomena you mention, in many different species over the years, and have tried to explain this with different seasons not being conducive to flowering, plants exhausting their energy stores one season and needing to recuperate, and young plants that may not be able to flower consecutive seasons. I would be patient and watch them for another season or two. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Would anyone consider an bromeliad a shrub or is it just a plant?
    Answer
    Dear davorox, members of the Bromeliaceae are herbs (i.e., herbaceous plants) that do not have secondary growth characteristic of woody plants. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    hello, I am wondering what this plant in my backyard is with the red stems. I live in Cypress, Texas. thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Nyssacoelho, you may have photographed Amaranthus blitum (livid amaranth) or Amaranthus deflexus (large-fruited amaranth), species known for leaves that are indented at the apex. Texas is a long way from my region of expertise, but I suggest you start there with your search for the name of this plant.
  • Question
    This appeared in my garden in Indianapolis, IN. The garden gets part sun/ part shade. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Sdixon00, the plant in your photographs is Eclipta prostrata (false daisy), a non-native member of the aster family. The opposite leaves and short white ray flowers are diagnostic marks for this species.
  • Question
    Hello, I was exploring the top of a pretty highly contaminated escarpment behind some commercial lots in Montreal this past April and it was covered in a tall grass--between 3 and 4 feet--with onion-like bulbs on the top. Like a wild garlic but I've never seen it so tall. I have a photo but it was so brown in the early spring I couldn't tell anything apart in it anyway. Thanks in advance.
    Answer
    Dear Caro, there is no image associated with your question, without one I won't be able to assist you. Please feel free to attach the images to an email and send it to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I try to help.
  • Question
    What is the background on this plant? How common are they ? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear Sitzmark, there is no image associated with your question, without which I cannot help you. If you are having trouble uploading images, please feel free to attach them to an email and mail them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you. Please be sure to include the location the plants were photographed in, this is a very important part information needed to assist you.
  • Question
    Want to know the name and benefits of this plants in Ghana, Africa. And the positive and negative effects it has in the body when consumed.
    Answer
    Dear Mahmudsina, good morning. There is no image attached to your question, without which I would not be able to help. However, be aware that Go Botany is a resource dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. The flora of the African continent is not known to me and I likely would not be able to assist you (sorry).
  • Question
    Im from Michigan I have a lovely waxy dark green leaf plant was given to me as a gift from my mother..ao unique hasn't done much in a few months..dont want to kill it..please help me haha..
    Answer
    Dear xRoseReaper, You're plant may be Ficus elastica (a species of fig). I am not an expert with cultivated plants, and so please take this as a potential answer that you should confirm (if possible). Best wishes.
  • Question
    If I plant what I think is Achillea millefolium, will it cross pollinate with the yellow yarrow already in my yard? If so, how far apart would they need to be to not do so? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear TranquilHaven02054, it is unlikely those two species will pollinate each other. The different flower color will attract different pollinators (in most cases) and the different species may not be compatible with one another. I have not seen reports in North America of such species hybridizing with one another.
  • Question
    I don't know where this photo was taken (probably the southern Berkshires. Curious what it was:
    Answer
    Dear tsuga13, you appear to have photographed Phacelia tanacetifolia (lacey scorpion-weed), a non-native member of the borage family. Beautiful plant, thank you for sharing.
  • Question
    These pictures were taken mid-May from my garden in Woodbridge, CT. I'm trying to ID the lettuce-like plants (not the violets, which we also eat). They reseeded themselves and I add them to my salads. My wife won't eat them as the hairs on the leaves bother her palate. The plants have recently bolted - stalks are 3-4 feet tall, but have not yet flowered. I don't recall planting them unless they came from a "mixed greens" lettuce packet I seeded a few years ago.
    Answer
    Dear solarpv, I'm sorry I cannot help you with this one. My realm of expertise is wild plants, and there are simply too many cultivated species for me to be familiar with them. I wish I could be useful for you.
  • Question
    Hi - I found this plant and think it is an angelica atropurpurea, but I'm not sure as the stems are not purple. This was seen at Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in Lenox, MA in a very wet lush area, June 16, 2018. Thank you for you help in identifying this! Anne
    Answer
    Dear Annezoo42, this looks very much like Angelica antropurpurea. Be aware the stems are often green in the early part of the year. The Housatonic River Valley is a place where this species is fairly frequent.
  • Question
    640 Dickinson Hill Rd, Russell MA Corydalis sempervirens?
    Answer
    Dear deeken96, the plant you photographed is pale-corydalis (Capnoides sempervirens). This plant usually is found in relatively dry soils, such as outcrops, talus, dry sand, and rocky woodlands. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi - sorry for poor picture. I have never seen or heard of this plant in VT. Found it on top of small rocky hill above Lake champlain, Chittenden county VT, vine, growing up a rock face. Believe it is adlumia fungosa, Allegheny vine, but Newcomb's called it climbing fumitory. I would like to know how common it is.
    Answer
    Dear pxdougla@gmail.com, you have photographed Adlumia fungosa. While quite uncommon in parts of New England, it is frequent in many parts of Vermont, especially in the limestone bedrock regions of the state (which is where you photographed it). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This came with my house in Auburn MA. It is growing in my lawn/ new flower bed I've created. Just behind it is a small retention wall then a very steep wooded hill. This area is covered with individual single leaves and the has flowered for the first time in 3 years (this in part be because we were mowing this area until this spring)
    Answer
    Dear kobrien, it looks like you have photographed Campanula glomerata (clustered bellflower). This is a non-native species found in the Campanulaceae. Beautiful plant.
  • Question
    Bonjour, I am Réjean Drouin, Québec City just canoed the St-John river northern part of Maine some camping site and one was a old farm site there were a bunch of Crataegus with opening leaves.Many Crataegus of New England . You can see the river map at St-John River Canoe Guide. It was around Ouelette Farm camp site. C. laurentii? C. shuettii, C. fluviatilis, C. favori, C. keepii, C. irrasa?
    Answer
    Dear rejeandrouin, good morning. Without images, I won't be able to assist you. There are several species that occur along the river, including two very rare species (Crataegus irrasa var. blanchardii and Crataegus oakesiana). If you have images, please upload them to that I may examine them. Best wishes.
  • Question
    What is this plant at my doorstep? Fayetteville in Onondaga county N.Y
    Answer
    Dear Cpl65, there is no image associated with your question, without which I won't be able to assist. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help.
  • Question
    Found this at Cedar Hill in Northboro MA in an upland field. It was windy so it was a little tricky getting the photos. It has 5 petals and very long narrow opposite leaves.
    Answer
    Dear kobrien, this plant is Dianthus armeria (Deptford pink), a member of the carnation family (Caryophyllaceae). It is found in open locations, such as fields and roadsides, similar to where you located this plant.
  • Question
    This was found on a shaded limestone ledge near Albany NY. Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed Sabulina michauxii (Michaux's sandplant), a species you will find under the name Minuartia michauxii in most references. It is a native species of (usually) rocky woodlands.
  • Question
    New to the site. I posted up two pictures of a plant I am not sure of and would like verification. Photos were taken in August 2015 in a previously logged 20 acre area behind my property which had been growing back for only two years. Supposedly a Northern Blazing Star which one book mentioned may be rare. Would appreciate any information. Thank you!
    Answer
    MaineRussian, you have a species of Liatris (blazing star), and it is either Liatris spicata or Liatris pycnostachya. However, in order for me to identify it, I need to clearly see the green bracts that surround each array of red-purple flowers in the flower head. If you can get an image of those, I can tell you the species. The former (Liatris spicata) would be a new state record for Maine.
  • Question
    What is this vine? Found in a Maryland garden. I think it’s wild.
    Answer
    Dear Dkckm, good morning. I'm sorry, but I can't see enough of this plant to identify it. It may be something in the Convolvulaceae (morning glory family), but there are several vining genera that this leaf could fit for. If you are able to find flowers, I can try to assist you further.
  • Question
    Hello, I believe I have white sweet clover (melilotus albus) growing in my wildflower garden. Although it's listed in the "Wildflowers of New England" book, I've read online that it's invasive. Should I remove it from my garden? I'm in Wilder, Vermont. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear ellenu5, yes, that does appear to be Melilotus albus. While it is listed as invasive, it is only aggressive in open habitats (such as roadsides). It does not invade forests and wetlands. While it can pose a threat to the upper area of shorelines, its listing as invasive should have an asterisk (given that it usually invades, for the most part, human disturbed habitats). The choice is really up to you and what goals you have for your garden.
  • Question
    Hi. I would like to know the name of this plant. Found at the roadside in Malaysia.
    Answer
    Dear Sarahlee, good morning. Maylaysia is a long way away from my region of expertise. That written, you appear to have photographed a member of the Verbenaceae (vervain family), possibly the genus Verbena (vervain). Hopefully this will get you started on your study of this plant.
  • Question
    I found this unusual growth on what I believe is a White Spruce, and was wondering if you could give me an idea what's happening with that tree. My guess would be that the unusual twigs are growing out of some sort of gall, but thats just a gues as I can not get a closer look at it since it is about 10 feet off the ground. Boothbay Harbor, Maine 43.866552, -69.637114
    Answer
    Dear Kurt_Hassleman, there is no image associated with you question. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help to help you.
  • Question
    I was told this is a type of sunflower. This was given to me. Can you help? Minnesota is where I live North Central location.
    Answer
    Dear callalillyus1, there is no image associated with your question. Without an image, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    What is best for treating kidney and liver failure. Please HELP!
    Answer
    Dear steffany@-3--, you need to find a qualified health professional, whether that be western medicine or natural medicine. Looking for advice from websites could be harmful to your health. I wish you the best.
  • Question
    Hi Arthur, this shrub was growing trailside at Mackworth Island State Park, Maine. Opposite leaves with small teeth. Pink flowers with 5 petals. I find shrubs difficult and the large number of non-natives and invasives adds to the challenge. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Alanseamans, it appears that you have photographed a Weigela floribunda (crimson weigela) with light pink flowers. This species normally has dark red flowers, but different cultivars can have different colors. I assume this was planted at one point.
  • Question
    My Rosa virginiana and my strawberries, which are next to each other, all look like this? Could this be a gypsy moth infestation? What could be wrong and how can I fix it?
    Answer
    Dear natalieillsley, I wish I could help you, but plant pathogens is not a topic I have a deep understanding of. You might want to contact the horticulture department at Garden in the Woods and see if they can assist you. You might try Mark Richardson (mrichardson[at]newenglandwild.org) to see if he recognizes the pathogen you are dealing with. Good luck.
  • Question
    hi, I found this plane near the Nh coast, there was a small patch of them. The stem is smooth and the entire plant was white. Can you help me to id ? Thanks
    Answer
    Dear lisahu, I'm sorry I can't help you with this one. It clearly has some pathogen that is causing it to lose its usual color. If you can tell me if it was a woody plant or herbaceous plant, I might get a little further. Best wwishes.
  • Question
    This plant started appearing in May and is still happily growing in my backyard in Westford, MA. It has fringed leaves and dainty purple flowers. It sends out creepers and roots those. What is it?
    Answer
    Dear twexler, nice images, thank you for including more than one. This plant is Glechoma hederacea (Gill-over-the-ground), a non-native mint of open habitats, such as lawns and fields. It has beautiful flowers (as you have captured in the image).
  • Question
    It seems I’m having trouble uploading pictures to your site. Is there another way to contact you? Thanks
    Answer
    Nancy, you can always attach your images to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    At Quincy Bog in Rumney NH (an area I'm very familiar with), I came upon this solitary specimen of what appears to be Sorbus americana. This individual plant is about 7' tall and stands under a canopy of white pine, but gets a fair amount of sunlight. Is there enough in the attached photos to distinguish it from Rhus glabra? Is there a sure-fire way to distinguish S. americana from R. glabra without a flower?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, this is a species of Sorbus. Some ways you can distinguish the genera vegetatively. Rhus has a milky latex that would exude from a wound, there are no glands on the leaf rachis, and the axillary winter buds are embedded in the leaf stalk base. In Sorbus, the sap is watery, there are clusters of small, dark glands on the leaf rachis where the leaflets are produced, and the axillary winter buds are observable at the base of the leaf stalk. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Growing in amongst the rocks just feet from the shore of Trout Pond in Lyme NH, I saw a number of these shrubs with decidedly purplish-red petioles. The leaves appear to be entire. I included a picture of the leaves and the bark. Hopefully this is enough to get us to the genus. I've also seen what I believe is another sample of this on the sunny exposed cliffs of Rattlesnake Mountain in Rumney.
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, you've photographed Ilex muronata (mountain holly). This is a native shrub of wetlands and exposed, sometimes high elevation, habitats. If you try to look this species up in a book, you will more likely find it under the scientific name Nemopanthus mucronatus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Here's a photo of a plant I discovered in amongst the rocks at the shore of Trout Pond in Lyme, NH. Looks like it will be blooming shortly. It has this unique what I think would be called bipinnate leaf structure. Is there enough in this photo to identify either the genus or species?
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, you've photographed Aralia hispida (bristly sarsaparilla), a native plant of (usually) open and somewhat drier habitats. If you examine images on the web of this species, you can confirm the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello kind sir, I have looked through the potentilla's and none of the images quite match this variety. Do you recognize it?
    Answer
    Dear TrishBerube, the plant looks very much like Potentilla argentea (silver-leaved cinquefoil), a species with gray-white hairs on the underside of the leaves. This is a common species over much of the northeastern United States in open fields, along roadsides, etc.
  • Question
    Hello, I can't find this little guy. It's about about half the size of a bluet. Would you happen to know the name? Snapshot was taken in Lewiston Maine this past Sunday. Such a little beauty up close.
    Answer
    TrishBerube, you've photographed a species of Spergularia (sand-spurry), likely Spergularia rubra (red sand-spurry). This is a non-native weed of open areas with small, pink-red flowers. Beautiful image.
  • Question
    The apple pictured is a of the Gala variety,typically striped.The stripes swirl around a brown protrusion. The protrusion is flexible,in the way a leaf is flexible. The flesh underneath is not discolored or soft. The apple is not misshapen,the seeds are not un-developed or underdeveloped. I realize that this site is about native New england plants,but you can pretend the apple is a crabapple. Thank you.
    Answer
    Beautiful picture pkbeep.
  • Question
    Hi. This sedge has appeared in abundance in our yard in north-central Connecticut. Visually, the closest matches I can come up with are Carex vulpinoidea and Carex annectens. However, those plants have wetland-indicator designations of OBL and FACW respectively, whereas the soil on our site is very well-drained. But I can't find any upland sedges that are as close a match. Thank you for your help. (I can try to take some better pictures if necessary.)
    Answer
    Dear DavidJ, the plant in your photograph does look very much like Carex vulpinioidea. These species sometimes show up in disturbed areas that are unlike the natural wet meadows and shorelines that we might find them in usually.
  • Question
    Is this Anaphalis margaritacea? Grows in large colonies in my lawn in western Adirondack Mts. 6-10 inches high, with only white color flowering (no trace of yellow), few small leaves on stalk, limited branching, going to seed about 4 weeks after emerging from ground. A spring species. A non-native?
    Answer
    Dear tomyancey, good morning. You've collected Antennaria howellii (small pussytoes), a native member of the Asteraceae that belongs to a similar group of plants that includes Anaphalis. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This plant is in my yard in orange, MA. It is about a foot high with only 3 leaves. It has a yellow bloom about 2” tall.
    Answer
    Dear Sugarmama2, this plant appears to be a yellow-flowered wake-robin (genus Trillium). There are no native species with that color petals found in the northeast. Perhaps this is something planted or a contaminant in a seed mix? Best wishes.
  • Question
    Is Nigella Sativa different than Onion seeds? There is a whole lot of confusion as nigella seeds are called as black onion seeds sometimes in some stores. But i read that they both belong to a completely different family. Please clarify Thank you
    Answer
    Dear Rash108, Nigella sativa belongs to the crowfoot family (Ranunculaceae). It is a dicot plant with very different flowers and chemistry. Onions belong to the genus Allium, in the onion family (Alliaceae). These are monocots. They are different groups of plants that are confused because of the common names. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    I noticed this plant in my yard in Orange Ma. At this time it is about 3 ‘ tall. Leaves look like a grape leaf about 4-5” wide. The bloom is about 3” across. I know for sure it is not Queen Ann’s lace. There are about 12 of these growing in the same area among some young oak saplings.
    Answer
    Dear Sugarmama, the photograph is a little out of focus, so I answer here is tentative. It could be Viburnum acerifolium (maple-leaved viburnum), a native species with white flowers and blue fruits. If you can upload an image of the leaves that is in good focus, I should be able to confirm this for you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this flower in my New Hampshire garden and haven’t planted anything like it. I couldn’t get the whole flower in a picture without potentially damaging it. The petals are bell shape with multiple yellow pistils and have 5 smaller petals surrounding the bell. the stem is long and thin and leaves are rounded with 5-7 edges and are growing in an alternating up the stem. I’ve been searching online and haven’t seen anything like, if you could help to identify it would be greatly appreciated!
    Answer
    Dear Ckulczyk, good afternoon. You've photographed a species of columbine (a member of the genus Aquilegia, in the crowfoot family). I don't know which species you have found, but hopefully knowing the genus will be helpful in your search for the name. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this plant in india.it grows in river,pond etc.plz find the id.Thank u
    Answer
    Dear bikram2651, there is no image associated with your question. I won't be able to assist without an image. If you are having trouble uploading images, please feel free to email me the images at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist. Please be sure to include where in the world the plant in question was photographed.
  • Question
    Hello, I found this herbaceous plant in a deciduous upland forest in Southeastern (dominated by oak). The plant was approximately 12" in height. The leaf was pinnately lobed. No flower/inflorescence was present May-early June. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, your message notes you found this is "Southeastern", but no state or province is noted. Therefore, please understand this answer is contingent on the plant growing in the northeast. It is a species of Nabalus, likely N. trifoliolatus (three-leaved rattlesnake-root). This is a native species found in a wide variety of habitats.
  • Question
    Hi, On a recent walk near a pond around Chebacco Lake Woods we saw a plant, that we can't identify. Please see the photo attached. It was located next to the path around one of the small ponds. There were only 3 plants, we haven't seen any others like that one in the area. It was on the sunny side of the path close to shrubs. Visible because of the unique look and the redish color. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear rareflowers, you have photographed Sarracenia purpurea (purple pitcherplant). This is a native, carnivorous plant that is typically found in acidic wetlands, such as bogs. Great find and thank you for sharing.
  • Question
    Found this plant in south east Ct. Mixed forest habitat. Could you please identify? Thank you.
    Answer
    Nancy, good morning. You appear to have photographed Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng). It would be unusual to find it in mixed forest habitat as it usually grows in rich, moist, often rocky, deciduous forests. This plant is under threat from over-collection.
  • Question
    I wish this little plant was flowering, but maybe you can identify it anyway. It was found growing out of a rock wall overlooking a pond near Ravena NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Auntie, While I can't be certain, the plant looks like a species of Potentilla, perhaps P. norvegica (Norwegia cinquefoil), a species that, despite its name, is native (in part) to North America.
  • Question
    This was found in a yard under bird feeders not far from Albany NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, the plant in the photograph looks like Thlaspe arvense (field penny-cress). It has interesting, nearly circular (in side view) fruits that will be produced later in the summer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello! Every year I harvest this wild onion plant along the riverbanks of the Sheepscot. I am wondering which of the alliums this plant may be. It grows abundantly here and is a great food plant. Unfortunately it is spring and I have yet to see the flowers.
    Answer
    Dear three.left.hands, There is no image associated with your question. Without the image, I'll have a hard time answering your identification question. There are two wild species of Allium (onion, garlic) that are rare in Maine and should either avoided for food or collected with certain protocols. If you can email me images or a description of what you have collected, I can help you identify the plants and provide direction on eco-conscientious collection methods. My email is ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, hope to hear from you.
  • Question
    Low bush, deer resistant with tiny yellow four petal flowers on the edge of woodland. Putnam County, NY Thank you
    Answer
    Dear Roxi, good morning. The shrub in the photograph is Elaeagnus umbellata (autumn-olive), a non-native species from Asia with small scales on the leaves and branchlets. The fruits (red with silver scales) will appear in September.
  • Question
    This flower was found along the grassy overlooks near Lake Champlain in Orwell VT Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, it looks like you have photographed Cerastium fontanum (mouse-ear chickweed), a common, non-native perennial from Europe. It mainly occurs in human-disturbed and human-manicured habitats, but occasionally is found in pristine areas as well.
  • Question
    This flower was found in a wild area near Lake Champlain in Orwell VT Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed Micranthes virginiensis (early small-flowered-saxifrage), a native plant that typically grows in rocky forests, on ledges, and places where the soil is thin.
  • Question
    This flower was seen in a wet woods near Saratoga NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, your plant is Turritis glabra (tower-mustard), a native, often weedy, mustard with clasping leaves and very pale yellow to yellow flowers.
  • Question
    Found in a trail through the woods, town of Lake George, NY. There were plants that had the same form but were green, although this purple color was more common. I apologize that the photos are not the greatest quality. As always. thank you!
    Answer
    Dear SunnyMona, you appear to have photographed Lysimachia quadrifolia (whorled yellow-loosestrife). When emerging, the leaves can be quite red, but will change to green and flowers on long, slender stalks will grow from the axils of the leaves. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This flower was found along a wet path in Saratoga Co. NY Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you have photographed Moehringia lateriflora (blunt-leaved grove-sandwort). This is a native species in the Caryophyllaceae. Beautiful image.
  • Question
    I'm seeing this plant at Quincy Bog in Rumney, NH in a Beech & Maple forest beneath Witch Hazel. My sense is that these are the recently emerged leafs of what will ultimately become a more fully formed Tall Rattlesnake Root (Nabalus altissimus) plant. Could it be something else?
    Answer
    dear gdewolf, I agree, it definitely looks like a species of Nabalus (rattlesnake root), and Nabalus latissimus is a good hypothesis. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I discovered this plant only a few feet from the edge of the beaver pond at Quincy Bog Natural Area in Rumney. I believe it is in the genus Rubus, but was wondering if there was anything diagnostic about the bluish-green coloring of the leaves...or their shininess..that might allow me to hone in on the species. These pictures were taken shortly after a light rain, but when I viewed them while dry the day before they were shiny.
    Answer
    Dear gdewolf, good afternoon. Your plant is likely Rubus hispidus (bristly blackberry). This is a native species that typically shows three, leathery, glossy leaflets on the primocane leaves (which have a distinctive shape as well--obovate). The armature of this species is primarily small-based prickles and stiff bristles.
  • Question
    Hi. Saw this at McDowell Dam, alongside a road that runs along the reservoir, in Peterborough NH, yesterday, and am stumped. Looks like a sedge, but there are so many sedges! Was growing in an area that's damp and floods every winter. Thanks for looking at it fore me.
    Answer
    Dear rayban19, good afternoon. Because the plant is young (for a sedge) and I don't have images of a few items I need (such as the ligule, where the leaf blade meets the leaf sheath), I can only narrow this down to two likely identifications: Carex lacustris (lake-side sedge) or Carex utriculata (swollen-beaked sedge). These are two, common, native sedges in New England.
  • Question
    Hi, I see these pretty clusters of light purple flowers in the Boston area. I don't recall seeing them in previous springs. I'm not sure if the flowers in the picture are from the tree of from the parasite around it. Any idea what this is?
    Answer
    Dear yigalagam, you appear to have photographed a species of Wisteria (also known by the common name wisteria), a liana in the legume family. I cannot identify the species you have from the single photograph you provided, but hopefully knowing the genus will be helpful to you. If you provide additional photographs of the leaves I may be able to suggest which species this is.
  • Question
    I’m having trouble identifying this plant.
    Answer
    Dear Colleentara, you appear to have photographed Anemone quinquefola (wood windflower). This is a native North American member of the crowfoot family that flowers in the spring. I can't tell you for certain what species you have because I don't know where this photograph was taken. Location is a really important part of the identification process. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This young fern was found on a slope down to a wet woodland near Saratoga NY. I think it is an Adiantum species. I'm not sure which species? Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you have definitely photographed a species of Adiantum (maidenhair fern). I can't tell you which species without seeing the mature leaf blade and knowing what the substrate is (calcium-rich vs. serpentine). Certainly, Adiantum pedatum is the most widespread and common species in the east. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please i need full detail and cytogenetic information Asystasia calycina.Thanks
    Answer
    Dear oladapo4jesus.com, I would like to help you, but this website is dedicated to wild plants of New England. You might want to try searching online for this information.
  • Question
    This shrub/tree was found along the Hudson near Stillwater NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you have photographed a species of Amelanchier (shadbush). To identify this member of the rose family, I would need to learn if there are hairs on the summit of the ovary, which can be seen in the very center of the flower.
  • Question
    This young fern was found along the Hudson near Stillwater, NY Thank You,
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, the fern you photographed is a Onoclea sensibilis (sensitive fern), a native member of the sensitive fern family. It is common in wetlands and along shorelines.
  • Question
    Could you please identify this shrub. It belonged to my grandma
    Answer
    Dear Nicolejd60, I'm sorry I don't think I will be able to assist from the image attached. I would need to see a close picture that showed the details of the flowers, leaves, etc. Also, I need to know where this is growing (location information is very important for identification). Best wishes.
  • Question
    This sedge was found in a wet woods near Albany NY Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, I'm sorry I can't help with this one. This is a species in the genus Carex (family Cyperaceae). I will need to see mature perigynia to help you further.
  • Question
    This flower was found in a ditch between the woods and a home near Albany NY Thank You
    Answer
    Dear Auntie, you've photographed Anemone blanda (Greek windflower), a non-native species in the crowfoot family. Beautiful images.
  • Question
    This is a plant growing on in sandy soil in Scarborough, Maine.... It blooms in late summer. It is pretty but unfortunately over aggressive. The blooms are double and pink. Are you able to identify it?
    Answer
    Dear Fpolygala, the flower buds in the image are out of focus, so I can't help you. If you are able to send a clear image of the flowers, I should be able to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Need ID help on this guy. May 5, base of Mt Norwautuk, Granby MA. Mixed forest. Not very wet or dry. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear tsuga13, you have photographed Anemone quinquefolia (wood windflower), a native member of the crowfoot family. This is a relatively common, spring-flowering species of moist, deciduous forests.
  • Question
    Hello again, I have 7 photos of the maybe Pitch Pine. I had trouble sharing with you. I will try again! Massachusetts - Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, I can only see two leaves per fascicle--though I don't have a good view. This would indicate another species (e.g., possibly Pinus nigra). Feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org to discuss further if you would like. Thank you for posting all the images. It makes my work much easier.
  • Question
    This tiny flower was found in Saratoga Co. NY I'm wondering about Thalictrum species?? Thanks
    Answer
    Auntie, good morning. Your plant is Anemone quinquefolia (wood windflower), a native member of the crowfoot family. This is a common, spring-flowering plant of forests (usually moist, deciduous types).
  • Question
    Hello and happy spring. I have been trying to ID a pine tree for many years now. What I have finally come up with is Pinus rigid - Pitch pine! Am I correct? Thank you, Sue L-B Massachusetts
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, good morning. Can you please take a closer image? I'm not able to see details necessary for identification. Pitch pine (Pinus rigida) is the only wild-growing species in the northeast to have 3 leaves in each fascicle of leaves. If you can confirm this is the case (not 2 or 5, as in other species) then it is very likely you have photographed pitch pine.
  • Question
    Sunny former vegetable plot in western MA; I see a few of these bunched things and can't tell if they might be rhubarb or a weed. They started from red bulbs! If you happen to know any of these fuzzy oblong-leafed things too, they look like they might flower but nothing yet. Don't want to dig up anything important or useful in haste!
    Answer
    Dear Jone, the pubescent leaves with prominent veins on lower surface is comfrey (genus Symphytum). The leaves with prominent red midveins are a species of dock (genus Rumex). The others look like cultivated rhubarb. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi i was given some seeds i grew last year they didnt flower just green then this year its grown really strong looks like it may flower but what is it?
    Answer
    Dear Sammyboo, I am sorry I can't identify your cultivated plant for you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. That written, if it flowers, do send me images of the flowers and flowering plant and I'll ask someone on our horticultural staff to give you a hand. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi. I just bought a house and have discovered burning Bush has really taken over the woods. There is a brook with some natural springs in the wooded area behind my house. Should I remove these shrubs? They are absolutely everywhere! I've posted a picture in the "reported" section...
    Answer
    Dear mariposa08, if you would like to discuss the situation of winged spindle-tree (also known as burning bush), feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org. Please let me know what state you are located in and I can try to provide some guidance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please I want to know English and scientific name of this plant, from Northern Nigeria, found in woodland, its Mohammed edible,I have never seen it fruits or flower.it taste like likenTeilfera. It produces milky water which is itchy. I only know the name in my native Hausa language. Its called kafi likita here. Kafi likita literary means better than Doctor. Its so named because it regerate blood in anemic patient quickly.
    Answer
    Dear rabiunaku, good afternoon. I'm sorry I cannot help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. I have looked online for such a plant as you have named, but I do not find one noted. I would suggest contacting a botanical museum in your country--there may be botanists who could assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi. I have looked for this plant in online DBs and can't seem to find it using a search. It sprang up last summer right next to a field stone perimeter around my home and now (4/29/18) has leaves popping out and purple flower heads. It has a main shoot 6+' high and two other shoots coming from the base about 3' long and closer to the ground. Can you help me to identify it? Thanks so much. Joe in Union, Maine
    Answer
    These are the flower buds and expanded leaves of Sambucus racemosa (red elderberry), a native member of the Adoxaceae. It has large lenticels along the branchlets and the pitch is orange-brown.
  • Question
    Hi, Finally received closer pictures of the flower in an Indiana yard. Hope this helps.
    Answer
    Dear ChristinaBecker, thank you for supplying the additional pictures. This appears to be a cultivated plant. Perhaps it is a species of Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), though I am not sure. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants, and cultivated species are not always known to me. You might check images of that genus and see if it is close to your plant.
  • Question
    I was kayaking in Turkey pond in concord nh and spotted this plant. The stem was yellow and has almost like scales on it. It was about ten feet long. Flowers and leaves were growing off one end. Still buds looked like they will be white. I cannot id. Can you help?
    Answer
    Dear Erinhuo, it looks like the rhizome of Nuphar (pond-lily). The rhizome has abundant leaf scars on it that give it the spotted aspect. The flowers will be yellow in this species. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have this tree in my yard that has two color flowers in one. It's a pink flower tree that is shaped like an umbrella, an ornamental one, I guess. But at the top of the trunk (5 feet above ground) couple of weird branches come out that has different bark, leaves and flowers (white). I can send more pics if you need. My question is: is this normal? Should I keep or cut the white white flower branches? Please help. Thanks, Vishnu
    Answer
    Dear plantnewbeee, good morning. There are multiple reasons why a woody plant may show different color flowers on some portion (or on some branches). These include grafts, reversions, and mutations (if you use those as search terms, you'll be able learn about these topics). It does happen with cultivated species and you can keep them or not (it is up to whether or not you like them). They do not harm the tree. Best wishes.
  • Question
    At what age do american beech trees generally develop the rigid dark-colored bark that spreads upwards from the roots? I'm not talking about BBD damage (as seen higher up the trunk in this photo), but rather the mature bark beeches develop at an old age (on the roots and just above). I had read that this occurs at around 200 years of age, but I had read the same thing for european beech. This is in NW CT. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear JoshuaH, good morning. I don't know the age when this occurs, and suspect there may also be other variables at play relating to site characteristics. That written, it must happen in extreme age because I've seen this very infrequently in New England and always on large trees. The age you've quoted may be a good estimate, but without an increment borer, it will be hard to know the true age of the tree. Thank you for posting the image.
  • Question
    hi i want to know that the photo i have attached belongs to the original and medicine aloe vera or not and can i use it's gel for skin?
    Answer
    Dear marjan_mashayekhpour, good morning. I'm sorry that I cannot help you. My expertise is wild plants of northeastern North America. Cultivated species and those found in distant lands are not always known to me. I wish I could assist you, but in this case I cannot. I hope you find an answer to your question.
  • Question
    Are you able to tell what type of moss this is from my photo? (Concord, MA) Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, good morning. Beautiful image. Unfortunately, I can't help with this one. While there are some mosses I'm familiar with, I'm not a bryologist. The expertise held here on this website is for tracheophytes (i.e., vascular plants with specialized conducting cells--called tracheids). These plants include ferns, gymnosperms, monocots, and all dicot plants (the latter of which are a non-monophyletic group). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found these leaves and husk in a strip of remnant pine bush habitat, in a commercial area near Albany, NY, back on March 27 (could not find the plant they came from.) There were many similar leaves scattered about on the ground. Are these American Chestnut? The leaves and stems felt smooth and I could not see any hairs.
    Answer
    Dear CathK, good morning. It looks as if you have found a species of Castanea (chestnut). I can't identify which species you have without fresh leaves. Hopefully learning it is a chestnut will help you with your study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    On 4/18/18, by Mill Pond, West Newbury, we spotted this fern which appears to be Lady Fern, but what surprised us was that Lady Fern is supposed to be deciduous, from what I read, and these fronds appeared matted down as if they had spent the minter under snow. Do the fiddleheads emerge unusually early in this species, or what?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, the fern you have photographed has leaves that are wintergreen (they remain green over the winter and then senesce). One of the most common ferns to display this trait is Dryopteris intermedia (given the misnomer "evergreen woodfern"). That is the species you have here. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you tell me what type of vine this is? It has a red vine with tendrils opposite the leaves the tendrils are forked. It has three or four in succession then the tendrils skip a leaf or two. I am pretty sure it is a grape but trying to research which variety is proving difficult.
    Answer
    Dear jennieanne, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Without them, I won't be able to help you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist. Please be sure to let me know where the plants were growing (location is a very important part of the identification process).
  • Question
    Hello thanks for having me I found a plant never seen this before wondering what it is I found it at 1900 to 2000 ft noth slope and kinda a meadow sandy Lomey soil northern cal (Feather falls California thanks look forward to hear from you
    Answer
    Dear Courioseael, you appear to have collected a species of Asclepias (milkweed) while the flowers are opening but the stalks haven't elongated. The notched leaf bases with prominent red veins suggests it could be Asclepias cordifolia. However, California is a long way from my region of expertise, but this will hopefully provide you a starting point in your study.
  • Question
    Please help identify this plant found in my woods in eastern Virginia, thanks
    Answer
    Dear Pointbreeze, it looks like you may be having difficulty posting images. If you aren't successful for any reason, feel free to email me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and attach the images to the email. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please help identify this plant found in in my woods in eastern Virginia, thanks
    Answer
    Pointbreeze, this looks like a form of Kerria japonica (Japanese-rose) with supernumerary petals (i.e., with a double corolla). It does escape cultivation occasionally in the eastern United States.
  • Question
    Please identify this plant found in the woods in eastern Virginia
    Answer
    Dear Pointbreeze, the plant in the photograph is Podophyllum peltatum (may-apple), a native member of the barberry family. The circular, lobed leaves with the petioles attached to the center are good diagnostic traits.
  • Question
    Do you know what this might be.. On rough ground in Ayr, Scotland
    Answer
    Dear Amber, I wish I could help you, but Scotland is a long way from my area of expertise. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. We share a lot of species and genera in common (i.e., I might be able to help you sometimes), but I can't assist with this. Sorry.
  • Question
    Good morning, Sir. I'm from Indonesia. Would you help me to identify those plants? Thank you
    Answer
    Dear afdillagi, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. The plants of Indonesia are unfamiliar to me. I encourage you to find an institution near you, such as an herbarium (plant museum) that might be able to lend assistance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    These grew from my neighbor's compost in So Cal. Can you help us identify it?
    Answer
    Dear cranblarry, I'm sorry, in this case I can't help. California is a long way from my area of expertise. While we have some plants in common, and I might be able to assist sometimes, there will be many things you could upload that I wouldn't recognize. Again, I'm sorry I can't help this time.
  • Question
    I recently visited my sister in Winsted, CT who showed me the plant in the attached photo (foreground). Could you please identify?
    Answer
    Dear kluna911.kl, the plant in the photograph is a species of Acer (maple), likely Acer palmatum or Acer circinatum. I would not be able to tell you which of these non-native maples it is without close-up images of the branchlets, winter buds, etc. But perhaps this will be enough information to get your study started.
  • Question
    Found at my creek in North Georgia.
    Answer
    Dear Connie, nice find. Ophioglossum vulgatum is very rare in New England, with only a single confirmed station in CT. Thank you for sharing.
  • Question
    why we have different life forms in plant such as phanerophytes,chamaephyte ,hemicryptophyte and geophyte ? from Tanzania thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Justin, the different forms of plants are to take advantage of different ecological niches. Not only do the climates of different land regions differ, but within those areas are differences in microsites: some wet, some dry, some hot, some cold, etc. The different forms of plants are capable of living in these different areas (i.e., they are adapted to the climate and microsites of where they live). I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Will you answer questions from Nova Scotia as well? Thank you
    Answer
    Dear Ursula, yes, we are happy to entertain all plant-related questions. Of course, the expertise here is New England and the further one gets away from New England, the harder it becomes to be certain of the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you id these two woodland plants, found in Nova Scotia, Canada, thank you
    Answer
    Dear Ursula, the two plants you have posted images of are relatively common, native species to the northeast. The one with larger leaves is Gaultheria procumbens (eastern spicy-wintergreen). The one that trails over the ground with opposite leaves that have a light-colored midvein is Mitchella repens (partridge-berry). I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Good afternoon After continued searching for the identify of the small white flower which looked like Cerastium diffusum, I believe I have identified it as Draba verna. The petals of Draba verna are deeply notched whereas Cerastium diffusum are less so. Also, Draba verna inflorescence is in early spring. The the inflorescence arises from a rosette and the flowers have 6 stamens. Respectfully Ed Rodgers
    Answer
    Dear Califyank, good morning. You are absolutely correct. I've blown up the image of the plant you sent originally and can see the leaves are all basal (which would not be the case in Cerastium diffusum). Good detective work and thank you for getting back in touch.
  • Question
    Good morning- could you help me with this winter shrub id? Scrub/shrub wetland in Hampshire county. Viburnum dentatum?
    Answer
    Dear KDC, yes, your plant does look like Viburnum dentatum. The opposite branches with gray-brown branchlets that are somewhat angled (i.e., they are not round) are good field marks. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Could you please suggest two or three native evergreen shrubs that are very low growing. About one foot tall. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear jm7.patel.gmail.com, to suggest some native plants, I would need to know a couple of items: where are you located and what conditions do you want those plants to endure (e.g., kind of soil, moisture level, sun exposure or shade). If you want to email me those details at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I can try to help you with your question.
  • Question
    My cousin in Indiana sent me a picture of flowers in his yard he cannot identify. I've never seen it and can't seem to identify the flower. Could you help?
    Answer
    ChristinaBecker, good morning. I'm sorry but the picture was taken from too far away and I can't see the necessary details. Can you ask your cousin to take some images from closer up, preferably from a few different angles? If so, I can try to assist you.
  • Question
    Good afternoon I just observed a small whit flower in my garden with deeply notched petals. The flower had four petals and a single ovary. The flower measure about 5 mm under a microscope. The image is very similar to Cerastium diffusum, sea mouse ear. I would appreciate your comments. Thank you in advance Ed Rodges
    Answer
    Dear califyank, good morning. The plant you have photographed looks much like Cerastium diffusum. If I were in the northeast, that is what I would label this species as. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I purchased this plant for myself and can't figure out what it is. It is an indoor plant. Please help me.
    Answer
    Dear ksdtor, you appear to have photographed a jade plant (Crassula ovata), a member of the stonecrop family. These are common household plants that will flower if given the right conditions. Best wishes.
  • Question
    My apologies, trying this again-- Wondering if this is a pitcher plant/ species of Sarracenia? Found in a wetland area, Salem, NY. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear SunnyMona, nice images--thanks for sharing them. You have photographed Symplocarpus foetidus (skunk-cabbage), a native, early appearing member of the arum family. Notice that the array of reduced flowers are found inside the enfolding bract (pitcher-plant would have the flowers on a separate stalk not associated with leaves). With this species (skunk-cabbage), the flowers appear first and then the leaves will follow as it warms up.
  • Question
    Recently I've noticed a lot of small shrubby willows in one of our wetlands, the largest specimens are about 7-9 feet tall with light grayish-green smooth bark with ridges beneath the bark. Their twig color is mainly red, but many others have yellow or even gray twigs, small fine hairs are present on the twigs. The few dried up leaves I've found are between half and an inch and a half long with sparse fine teeth on the smaller leaves. The oldest these trees can be is nine years. Northwest CT
    Answer
    Dear JoshuaH, unfortunately, I would not be able to assist you with just the images of branchlets and winter buds (some willows can be identified using these features, but I would want to be in the field examining the willows). Given that you are in a wetland, this may be Salix discolor--but you should have flowers emerging very soon. When you do, if you can send me another couple of images of the flowers and measure the length of the aments (i.e., catkins), I may be able to assist you with more confidence.
  • Question
    I found this plant growing few feet sprawling along the ground, matlike (in a moist spot - either naturally moist because it's at a plateau or from recent snow melt) from a public pond in Storrs, CT. An identification app claims it's water hyssop or Bacopa monnieri (or is it veronia peregrina ssp peregrina; its glabrous (simlar to purslne)?. I was inclined to think this was mouse-ear chickweed (or just plain old chickweed), but hairs are noticeably absent and the petioles on this are different.
    Answer
    Dear teenprogrammer, good morning. You have collected a member of the Caryophyllaceae (carnation family), as evidenced by the leaf arrangement, slightly swollen nodes, and subtly joined leaf bases. However, with just the vegetation, I can't tell you for certain which species you have collected. Chickweed does belong to this family, but I think flowers would be useful. Sorry I can't help you further.
  • Question
    Wondering if this is a pitcher plant/ species of Sarracenia? Found in a wetland area, Salem, NY. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear SunnyMona, there is no image attached to your question. Without one, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I can try to assist you.
  • Question
    Petasites japonicus? Growing in my neighborhood and I took some and have it in my yard.
    Answer
    Dear GriffonCottage, good morning. I don't have a clear view of the leaf blade to view characteristics that would allow a confident identification; however, that written, your plant does look like Petasites japonicus. Be aware it can be very aggressive and difficult to eradicate. But, no doubt, it is an interesting and beautiful plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Several years ago I found about 5 of these tiny orchid plants (I'm pretty sure they're orchids, anyway) under a blue spruce on my property in a southern suburb of Boston. I haven't seen them since. Below please find a photo of a plant and a closeup photo of one blossom.
    Answer
    Dear Chy, the plant you have photographed is Epipactis helleborine (helleborine orchid). This is a widely distributed, non-native (but not invasive) orchid that is found in a variety of forested and partly forested habitats in New England.
  • Question
    This tree fell during a recent storm. Just going off the bark, I would have identified this tree as either Quercus rubra, or Q. coccinea (parallel ridge pattern extends to nearly the base as opposed to dark blocky bark). However, the buds (at the crown) are greater than 7mm, angled, and covered in down which would lead me to identify as Quercus velutina. Could this individual potentially be a hybrid? Any recommendations to identifying when buds are not within reach in winter? SE CT. Upland site
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, The tree looks to be Quercus velutina. The bark of this tree, compared with Quercus rubra, is not always sharply distinct. Though many trees can be distinguished by bark alone, I have seen individuals that required additional characteristics to determine the species. One useful characteristic for Quercus velutina is that underneath the outer bark the color is distinctly yellow (or sometimes orange-yellow). Quercus rubra and other species are not as bright underneath the outer bark (viewed by using a blade to create a hole in the outer bark). This can help when winter buds are not available.
  • Question
    Would most "native to New England" (using a liberal definition of that term) plants be found on GoBotany? Would no invasive species be found on GoBotany? I ask because I would like to use GoBotany to distinguish between "native to New England" (probably found on GoBotany) and non native to New England plants (probably not found on GoBotany) to choose primarily native to New England plants for our front yard. Thanks for the great work!
    Answer
    Dear DRN, all plants that grow wild in New England (i.e., those that grow in the region outside of cultivation) are included on Go Botany. This means that native, non-native (and those non-natives that are invasive) are included. Let me know if you need anymore information.
  • Question
    Hi! I'd like more insight on this plant I believe is a kind of mint? It's located in my yard in the East Bay area of California. Thanks for any info.
    Answer
    Dear hcadientec, I wish I could help you. I would need flowers to identify this plant with any confidence--though I may have difficulty given your location. California is a long way from my region of expertise. I'm sorry that I can't offer you any more information than you already know. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you help me identify this flowering tree that we kept seeing on our vacation in eastern Tennessee? We don't see much like this in central Texas.
    Answer
    Dear Justin976, Unfortunately, I can't assist you much with this identification. The plant appears to be a member of the genus Prunus (cherry, plum), but I would need much more material to identify the plant if I'm able to--this tree is far out of range of my area of expertise. Sorry I can't be of more assistance.
  • Question
    Hi, I'm in Storrs, CT, and I found this in a grassy, moist area under a bench. It's total size, from one rosette end to another is roughly 4 inches, so it's small. I used an identification app, to identify it, which indicates it's hairy bittercress. I've eaten (tastes great!) hairy bittercress before, and I always smell any before I eat it to make sure I'm identifying it right. This has the same cress smell, but it looks different than what I've seen before. Is it a hybrid cress?
    Answer
    Dear teenprogrammer, good morning. Your image may be of a species of Erodium (stork's-bill, a member of the crane's-bill family). It hasn't expanded fully, making it difficult to be sure, but I would start looking there as to who this may be. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I’m so sorry for not being on point but I was looking for a way to find out what was that beautiful flower because even from where I’ve bought it they have no clue what it is 😄 I hope the enlarged pictures will help you identify it, and I thank you again for taking out of your time to answer!
    Answer
    Dear Kalina, Thank you for the images, but these are not straight on into the opening of the flower (they are straight on from the side). I'm sorry that I'm having a hard time communicating what kind of images I need. I would need an image taken from above and viewing straight down into the open flowers. Without that, I can't be any more confident than I was with the previous images. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Requesting ID help - there was quite a patch of these low-growing woody plants, most with the same fleshy pink leaves(?). Location: Schoodic Peninsula, Maine, across the road from the shore, wooded, sharing the roadside with Bunchberries and Three-Toothed Cinquefoil. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Cathk, you've photographed Vaccinium macrocarpon (large cranberry). The pink leaves you note are likely some kind of pathogen that has infected the leaves and caused them to be both misshapen and discolored. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Will you be so kind to help me identify this flower? Thanks in advance
    Answer
    Dear Kalina, good morning. Your plant may be a species of Alstromeria (Peruvian-lily). However, I would need a closer image of the flower shot so I can see straight into the flower to be certain. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While we try to assist with all plant related questions, some cultivated species will be outside of our area of expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. I have been walking around Blackstone Park in Providence, RI and I keep seeing this small, thin, opposite branched, shrub. It has these strange vertical bark pieces (in a simple form of the English Elm I think), leaving some green softer bark showing in between. I said that it is opposite, but on some of the plants, I wasn't quite convinced. Do you think you know what this might be?
    Answer
    Dear chersey121, you've photographed Euonymus alatus (winged spindle-tree), also known as burning-bush due to the bright red color of the fall foliage. This is a native of the Old World that is extensively naturalized in southern New England. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Regarding the gender of my Eastern Red Cedar (Concord, MA) again, I have attached another photo. I have been finding it difficult to get a good sharp photo, but I am hoping this one is better, and that you will be able to identify the gender. Many thanks!
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, thank you for trying to get another image. These look like pollen cones to me, similar to the other image you posted. Enjoy these trees! Best wishes.
  • Question
    Can you please identify this plant, in my garden, for me!
    Answer
    Dear 19hello50, good morning. There is no image associated with your question, without this I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble posting images, feel free to send them to me at ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    I bought this plant from a local nursery. They told me ( with uncertainty ) that it was a hoya. When i brought it home, it fell from my celing, pot cracked and a lot of damage done to the plant. The leaves are wrinkling and the flowers are starting to die off and shrivel. When I googled hoya I couldot find an example of the plant I have, under any types of variations of a hoya. Any idea on what this plant is?Round,waxy almost succulent leaves, and pink flowers. I'd love to get it healthy again
    Answer
    Dear strangecreek11, I'm sorry that I cannot help you with this question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. While I will always try to assist you with questions related to cultivated plants, sometimes I won't known the answer. In this case, the only thing I can offer is that this plant is not a species of hoya (they have a very different floral structure). Best wishes.
  • Question
    thank you for your reply on the Eastern Red Cedar! Is there a better time of year for me to get a picture to be sure its staminate? thanks again
    Answer
    Dear llsrvd, you're image was taken at a good time of year, but it just wasn't very clear (i.e., the image quality could have been better). If you are able to get an image that is in sharp focus, I could be more confident. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Please I bought the attached pictures of a plant I bought at Lagos- Nigeria Africa , and I would be very grateful to you if you could help me identify it. Thanks a million
    Answer
    Dear Plantationboy1234, I'm sorry I can't help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeastern United States. While we are happy to entertain all plant related questions, some species originate far outside of our region of expertise. Good luck with learning the identity of the plant.
  • Question
    Hi I purchase an Easter Red Cedar from Garden in the Woods. I now would like to add the opposite gender to get berries. I am attaching a picture taken this week of the cones on the one I Have. It's not a great picture, but are you able to tell if its male or female? Thanks@
    Answer
    Dear llsrd, good morning. As best I can tell from your image, you have a staminate plant. They appear to be pollen cones that are developing on the branchlet apices. Best wishes.
  • Question
    A friend of mine is touring Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania and came across this plant, with no name? Can you help identify please?
    Answer
    Dear tke735, it looks like a species of Cynara (globe-artichoke), which includes the cultivated species of artichoke that we eat. I do not know which species this is exactly, but hopefully knowing the genus will get you started on your study. Best wishes.
  • Question
    This was stuck to a red oak leaf on the forest floor in north-central Connecticut on 2018-2-16. It had the consistency of jelly and was semi-transparent. It looked a lot like a clump of melting snow. Eggs of some sort are in the jelly is my guess.
    Answer
    Dear David, I'm not sure what you have found. It could be a jelly fungus of some kind, but I've not seen this before. I wish I could be of more help, but I think this question should be directed to a mycological group. Good luck!
  • Question
    This flower, taken on 6/20/13, on the Joppa Flats grounds, Newburyport, doesn't seem to quite match up with your Ipomoea (Morning-glory) suspects, though it seems to look most like I. purpurea. I note the dark stems, and the more triangular leaves. Are there other flowers that look like Morning-glories?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, you've photographed Calystegia sepium (hedge false bindweed), a member of the Convolvulaceae. Note the two large green bracts that conceal the sepals (this is an important characteristic that identifies the genus). There are four different subspecies in New England, three of them native (and likely the one you've photographed is a native). Best wishes.
  • Question
    hi! can i ask what kind of bamboo species is this?
    Answer
    jezzy, I'm sorry that I cannot help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern United States). We only have a couple of introduced species of bamboo so I do not possess much familiarity with this genus. If I knew where you were located in the world, I might be able to help you find a resource near you to help with identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, this grass was identified on a frozen beaver pond. Habitat was a freshwater emergent wetland with many red maples snags (due to beaver activity). I don't have too many measurements but the height was 2ft and the inflorescence was approximately 4 inches in length. Other species in the vicinity was Decodon verticillatus. The plant grew a loose colony. Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, this grass looks like Glyceria obtusa (Atlantic manna grass), a native wetland grass. The dense collection of spikelets is one of its defining characteristics within this genus.
  • Question
    Hello! this plant may require more information and another picture during the growing season. This was approximately 1.5 ft in height in a freshwater emergent wetland on a frozen pond. The grass appeared to grow in loose clumps. Inflorescence was present on branches on the main axis. The plant was located in Stonington Connecticut.
    Answer
    Deer eehrlich, unfortunately, the plant remnants in the photograph are a little too tattered for me to identify. I'm sorry I cannot help you. A growing season image will be needed (and I look forward to it if you are able to secure one). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I live in upstate NY/VT border & In the fall I saw a plant ready to bloom in my garden and took it inside, can u tell me what this ?
    Answer
    Dear Jgm1a1, good morning. I'm sorry that I can't help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeast. While we will entertain any plant-related questions, some cultivated species are not known to us. Again, I wish I could be of more help with your question.
  • Question
    Hi! I wonder if you could help with the ID of this mint. I find them vexing, as there are so many genera. Based mainly on flowers and leaves, I'm leaning toward Scutellaria, sp. Hoping to get it to species. Additionally, do you have any general tips for navigating this family, other than trying to follow the Dichotomous Key?
    Answer
    Dear chafeemonell, it looks like you have a species of Nepeta (catnip) in the Lamiaceae. The leaf shape and venation suggest this, along with the morphology of the corolla. If this were a Scutellaria, there would be a transverse ridge across the top of the calyx (sepals). I can't tell you which species for certain without additional images, such as straight on to the flower. Navigating family level taxonomy is difficult, but with practice you learn the features of these families. Of course, the multiple-access key on Go Botany can sometimes reduce things down to a family or two for you. Keep at it (and I'm happy to help whenever I can) and you will learn the plant families of the region.
  • Question
    Picture of this garden from July of 2016 in Onion Lake, Saskatchewan. The question I am about to ask does not involve this picture either but as I take a botany online course there is only pretty much question left on my paperwork that I am stuck on but everything is all good and done. Just 1 question which is on my paper but I always good times with my plants and garden. Why some plants have to be harder than others?
    Answer
    Dear Kool_planter9, good morning. I'm not sure I understand your question yet. When you ask about "harder than others", are you describing the difficulty of propagating them or some other feature of their life history? If you want to send an email to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I am happy to discuss your question further.
  • Question
    I revived this plant from a 1" stalk and now 6mos in this is what it looks like... I was just wondering if you knew what it was... Thx in advance.
    Answer
    Dear bdk28602014, the plant you have pictured is a species of Kalanchoe, commonly cultivated species from Africa and Madagascar. These belong to the stonecrop family (Crassulaceae). Enjoy the flowers.
  • Question
    I trust you or others in your group can help ID the plant in the attached picture. I hope this is of interest. It was found on Mount Ann trail in Gloucester MA.Thanks- BP
    Answer
    Dear brucepiper40, thanks for your question. Unfortunately, I won't be able to help because the "plant" in the image is a species of fungus. You will need to direct this question to a mycology group. I'm sorry I can't be of more help.
  • Question
    Hi -- Can you help identify this moss or lichen? I found a number of specimens on hardwood trees in Dalton in northern New Hampshire. Thanks!!
    Answer
    Daltonfarm, I believe you have photographed a liverwort species in the genus Frullania. It is a relatively large genus, at least some of which grown on the bark of trees. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi. I'm really interested in finding out the name of this beauty so that I can plant it in an appropriate spot. Thank you!! :-). Kinda looks like a juniper to me. But I'm no botanist. Just getting into gardening. What I'm holding in my hand shows what the stems look like before they turn into tiny looking pines. Any help would be extremely appreciated. Thanks again.
    Answer
    Dear Cloettesdaddy, it looks like you've found Juniperus virginiana (eastern red-cedar). It is species that can have dimporphic leaves, such as those you have photgraphed here (long awl-like leaves and short, overlapping, scale-like leaves). It is a species that most often occurs in dry soils of woodlands, ridges, clearings, and field edges.
  • Question
    Hello. I'm trying to get this shadbush to species. I'm leaning toward A. canadensis, as the flowers seem most similar. Can you correct or confirm?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, Beautiful images. This is not Amelanchier canadensis, a species that would have more congested arrays of flowers and leaves that were tightly folded and densely pubescent at flowering. I can't identify it with certainly without items such as petal lengths (in mm), but it may be A. intermedia. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I think the brown object beneath the berries on what I think is a Juniperus virginiana tree is some sort of gall. The location: in an abandoned quarry (now a town park) in Rocky Hill, CT, 41.671736,-72.636182 .
    Answer
    Dear David, it looks as though you have photographed the cedar-apple rust gall, a species that is known to occur on species of Juniperus. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello. I've been struggling with this one for some time, now. The petals are shaped somewhat like the Weigela we have on the property at Joppa Flats Education Center, Newburyport, but the leaves and anthers and stamens seem more akin to Prunus persica. I couldn't find a woody plant with flowers like in the Guide. Photographed in Early May.
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, I agree with you this appears to be a species of Prunus, but I can't tell you which one without additional images. I would need a side view so that I can view the sepals, and mature leaf images would be a must. I'm sorry I can't offer you more assistance.
  • Question
    Can anyone identify this plant found under the melting snow in souther Maine
    Answer
    Dear MichellePayne, I would like to help you, but unfortunately the images are not clear enough and many characteristics I need to examine are not able to be seen. It may be a species of Ribes (gooseberry, current) or some other plant, but I would need clear images. If you have additional photographs, feel free to email them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help you.
  • Question
    Greetings Looking to i.d this green briar/thorn plant. Photo from South Bristol Maine Sept 2017 thank you
    Answer
    Dear Glasswort, I'm sorry I cannot help you with your plant. Many parts of the image are out of focus and, therefore, I can't make out important details. As best I can tell, it appears to be a species of Rosa (rose). If you have any other images, please send them to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org and I will try to help further.
  • Question
    Hi, I am wondering if this tree is a Black Maple? It is located in Cohasset (coastal town south of Boston) in a forest next to a trail upland but near a stream. I have never heard of this species but couldn't find anything else that it might be. I have heard that there may be some in the Blue Hills too. thank you, Katie
    Answer
    Dear katieh, it is too difficult to tell for certain which species of maple you have, but it is most likely you have Acer saccharum (sugar maple). Black maple isn't currently known from eastern MA. I would need to better understand the morphology of you plants with good images of the lower leaf surface. Feel free to contact me to discuss further.
  • Question
    Hello there, I am writing about the Willow tree. It is in Massachusetts with wet feet. I have decided it is likely a Goat Willow or Great Sallow Willow. Thank you for your time! Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, thanks for the update. Great you were able to come to an answer. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, This Bryophyte is located in Massachusetts with many many small specimens floating across the surface of our swamp. Some rooted at the edge in the dirt. Thank you much, Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, this is a species of liverwort called Ricciocarpos natus (purple-fringed riccia). This liverwort is distributed nearly around the world and can grow on land and in water.
  • Question
    Hello again, This plant is located in Massachusetts and lives in our swamp that is on an island in Salem Sound. Thank you for your help. I don't recall seeing it before. Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, this is another one that I need a closer image of to help you. There are some species of grasses (such as Zizania and Glyceria) that have floating leaves such as this (Zizania--wild rice--does only for a portion of the year). Another genus, Sparganium (burr-reed) has some species that produce floating leaves as well. I can't tell you which of these three options it is without more details, but, hopefully knowing this will help you next year because you need only identify which of these choices it is. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello for the last time this year. I now better know what you need to help me and will be working harder next year! This aquatic plant grows in a swamp, on an island in Massachusetts. The plant I need help with is the one with the floating central rosettes. Thank you again! Sue L-B
    Answer
    Dear SueLB, we will keep working together and make sure we can get your future questions answered. There are two species of floating life in this image, one of which I recognize because it is a tracheophyte (higher vascular plant). The ones with small leaves that are rounded at the apex and organized into a floating rosette are water-starworts (genus Callitriche). There are native and non-native species. To identify to the species, we need details of the fruits. I hope this is helpful and keep the questions coming.