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Native Plant Trust: Go Botany Discover thousands of New England plants

Questions and Answers

2022

  • Question
    I can’t identify this plant. Woody area. Central Maine
    Answer
    Dear allagash, you have photographed Polygaloides paucifolia (fringed false milkwort), a species formerly known by the name Polygala paucifolia (if you try to look it up in a wildflower book, it will be under the latter name in all likelihood). It is an infrequent (but not rare) native herb in the Maine. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, i'm trying to identify a shrub that i see all over the cape cod national Seashore around the ranger's station. I've also seen it in residential landscaping around Chatham ma. Any help identifying it would be greatly appreciated.
    Answer
    Ando1, good morning. This appears to be Cytisus scoparius (Scotch broom), a non-native shrub in the Fabaceae with green, angled branches. This species produces compound leaves with three leaflets and some simple leaves. It is most common in New England along the greater coastal plain. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I am from a little town in Massachusetts called North Brookfield. Since I was a young girl, I have been looking for a four leaf clover. I am now in my mid thirties and a mom of three young children anr barely have time to shower let alone scan for these lucky charms. I had the opportunity to spend a couple days outside recently and was excited to scan the grass. Astonished, I came across what I believe to be a four, five, six, and seven leaf clover. Can you help me?!
    Answer
    Dear Lyndsay, good morning. It does appear you have found an actual four-leaved clover. The +/- crescent marks on the leaves suggest this might be a species like Trifolium pratense (red clover). It is a common species that does grown on lawns and in fields. Wonderful find.
  • Question
    Located in MA. Just got a few Red Brandywine tomato plants that don’t look super healthy. Before I plant them in the raised beds, would like to know if there are any major diseases going on here. There are yellow leaves, a few leaves with some gray/black on them and one or more leaf that appears gradient dark then becoming more light towards the tip. They also appear puffy. I can include more photos if helpful. Thank you for any help you may be able to provide. Melissa
    Answer
    Dear melissaj312, good morning. I'm sorry that I cannot help. I am not a plant pathologist or horticulturalist. There are many things that can affect plant growth that I'm not familiar enough with to diagnose. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plant identification and conservation in New England. I hope you will be able to find the answer and keep your plant healthy.
  • Question
    I just have a question about Urishol. I see too many conflicting things online bout it. Does the plant have to be damaged to release the oil? If you do get it on you what is the best way to get it off everything? I use 91 percent alcohol and spray it on items I believe to have gotten in the oil even if I haven't touched it or know its there. . Are there any items out there that can be sprayed on that you know to work well. I need your help I am terrified to even go in the woods at this point.
    Answer
    Dear themooseinacanoe, good afternoon. The answer is: it really depends on your sensitivity to urishiol. For example, I can walk among the species of poison-ivy and even touch them lightly without issue. Others, that is too much contact and they develop dermatitis. No, you don't have to damage the plant if you are very sensitive. Soap works well, but you must remember that a large proporton of the urishiol has already absorbed within ten minutes. So, lawsone containing plants like touch-me-not (genus Impatiens) works well because the lawsone binds to the same receptor areas as urishiol but is both more aggressive and non-allergenic. The sap from Impatiens can be applied hours later and drastically reduce or even block any allergic reaction. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, Here is a closer pic
    Answer
    Dear ando1, good afternoon. Thank you for a closer image. The plant looks like Cytisus scoparius (Scotch broom), a non-native woody plant that is most common in the region along the greater coastal plain. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, i'm trying to identify a shrub that i see all over the cape cod national Seashore around the ranger's station. I've also seen it in residential landscaping around Chatham ma. Any help identifying it would be greatly appreciated.
    Answer
    Dear ando1, good morning. The image you've uploaded is simply too far away from the plant for me to see any details. Do you have an image taken closer to the plant so that I can see the leaves, stems, etc.? If so, please upload it so I can assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Small tree at the edge of wetlands, Lincoln, Massachusetts.
    Answer
    Dear jfc, good morning. I'm certain from the images you provided, but it looks like a sapling of Betula alleghaniensis. You can confirm the identification by seeking a wintergreen odor from the bruised branchlet. If this is not correct, email me and we can discuss further. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi There’s a large section of my wooded property where Rubus idaeus is spreading and thriving. My research has come up with conflicting information and I’m not sure if it is a native of my area. I am in the southwest part of Connecticut. Can you confirm that it is ok to let spread and that it is not invasive in my area? I have been fighting to keep barberry, garlic mustard and burning bush off my property and don’t want another invasive species to take their place. Thank you Danielle
    Answer
    Dear DanielleD, the question you have asked is a bit nuanced. Rubus idaeus is both a native and non-native shrub in New England. There are two subspecies: subsp. strigosus (native) and subsp. idaeus (non-native). They can be identified by the presence/absence of stipitate glands along the axis of the inflorescence and sometimes also on the young stems (present is the native, absent in the non-native). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi, my name is Chloe and I'm here to ask questions for my high school research project. The first question is what kind of work do you do as a botanist? The next is what do you like and dislike about your work? The last question is what is your advice for future botanists? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear chloev, good afternoon. I am a plant taxonomist, so I study plant identification and classification. As part of this work, I teach people how to identify plants and use that skill to locate and survey for rare species. I'm fortunate as there isn't much that I actually dislike about this work. Sometimes we have to work in difficult conditions (e.g., precipitation, heat, biting insects), but I don't mind these things. Future botanists should be aware that as apps and technology increases for identification help, people are losing their skill at identifying plants. With this comes a loss of detailed knowledge of plants and their morphology--which also impacts our ability to interact with plants in other ways (such as for food and medicine). Intimate knowledge of plants comes from many years of study--not the newest smartphone app. I hope this helps.
  • Question
    Dear Botanist, I have two Prunus americana in my back garden and am worried about how hard they will be to maintain and how large they will get (shooting sucker babies all over the place). Also, I was told that my plum tree needed a friend in order to make plums, which is why I got the second tree. Some website say Prunus americana self-pollinates, other say they cross pollinate, and others say they self-pollinate but will produce even more with a friend. Which is it? Thank you, NI
    Answer
    Dear nillsley, good morning. I too have seen contradictory information on the self-compatibility of Prunus americana. I cannot resolve this question for you, unfortunately. I do notice low fruit set when there is a single large clone of this species, suggesting it is primarily self-incompatible. I think have different genotypes around for pollination is a good practice. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Dear Botanist, Can you tell me what plant this is? I found it in the woods in Lincoln, RI near dogwood, wild geranium, hay scented fern, Christmas fern, and greenbriar. Thanks, Sherry D.
    Answer
    Dear sldz22, this is a species of Nabalus (rattlesnake-root; often called by the genus name Prenanthes in older works). The broken leaf with exude white latex from the wound, like in a dandelion (but not as copious). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi there, Woud it be possible for you to identify this sedge found throughout the woods in Lincoln, RI? Thanks so much! Sherry D.
    Answer
    Dear sldz22, good morning. I cannot identify this sedge from the images provided. It appears to be a member of the genus Carex, but beyond that, I would at least need images of the mature fruiting plants. There isn't enough to go on at the moment. If you can get images later in the growing season, I may be able to assist.
  • Question
    I bought this shrub like Eleagnus umbellata, and now it has bloomed for the first time and the flowers don't look like eleagnus and I can't identify the plant. If you enlarge the picture, you can see that it has a kind of thorns near the leaves. Thank you very much!
    Answer
    Dear eugenia, good morning. I'm not certain who your plant is. It appears to be something in the rose family (which includes a large number of woody plants like apple, cherry, plum, hawthorn, pearlbrush, etc.). Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. Plants that are cultivated can originate from all over the world and may be outside my region of expertise. I'm sorry I can't be of help this time.
  • Question
    Hi, Can you tell me if this is a color variation of Trillium erectum (alba?) Or something else? Seen in Southern Vt. amongst "other white and red Trillium". Thank you, Star
    Answer
    Dear starletta, good morning. You've found an extremely rare variation of this Trillium species. I've only seen images of this once. Would you be willing to send me a full size version of this image? If so, please email me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. Thank you.
  • Question
    Hi! I have an indoor lucky bamboo plant that has white bud like sprouts on the stems. Could you please tell me what are those? Do bamboo plants grow buds or flowers? I live in Alberta Canada. Thank you
    Answer
    Dear Sage0101, good morning. Dracaena braunii (lucky bamboo) do produce flowers, but they look very different from the small shoots being produced in your image. These look like new branches/leaves being formed. I don't know why they are white (presumably, they will become green in the near term). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Continues from my last post about possible elderberry. Flowers are off now. But when on were white and smelled amazing. Maybe poke berry ?
    Answer
    MadeleinRae, the plant in the images looks to be a small individual of Sambucus racemosus (red elderberry). The opposite, pinnately compound leaves and array of flowers that is taller than wide point to this species. Sambucus canadensis (black elderberry) has a flat-topped array of flowers, but not Sambucus racemosa. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello I’m sending some more pictures over. The blooms have gone. The bloom structure might be a little different than elderberry is it pokeweed maybe ?
    Answer
    Dear MadeleineRae, there are no images associated with your question. Without them, I won't be able to assist. If you are having trouble uploading images feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. I will try to assist you once I get your email.
  • Question
    Hello! Could you please help me to identify the plants that grow near my neighbor's house? Is it Japanese Knotweed? I live in Northern Massachusetts. Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear ttzh, good afternoon. Yes, this is a species of Winged-knotweed (genus Reynoutria), to which Japanese winged-knotweed belongs. However, the leaf blade shape suggests this is Bohemian winged-knotweed (Reynoutria x bohemica), which has Japanese winged-knotweed as one of its parents. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! This is on the forest ground next to my driveway in Epping NH. It looks similar to elderberry snd the flower smells amazing. I feel like the leaves are slightly different though. Can you help?!
    Answer
    Dear MadeleineRae, good afternoon. It is hard for me to be certain from the photograph without additional images to provide a view from different angles. The image is consistent with Sambucus racemosa (red elderberry), but, again, I would need other images to be confident. If you an upload more I can try to confirm this hypothesis.
  • Question
    Orleans, MA Seen in profusion in a grassy farmland (dry) field on May 8, 2022. Seems to fit the description of Myosotis discolor, especially the flowers with yellow centers but yellow or white petals turning blue. Leaves are basal and alternate on the stem, and clasping (about 1 cm. long at the base) and the edges have long bristly hairs. The distribution map only shows this species in central MA though. Are there other species that fit this description? (Sorry about the sideways photo!)
    Answer
    Dear d_hamilton, good morning. Yes, I do believe you have collected Myosotis discolor. However, to be certain, I would need a specimen. Is it possible for you to dry this plant and send it to me? If so, I can provide more directions. Please contact me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. This would a new county record and a very rare (non-native) plant in New England, so it would be good to document this population with a specimen. Thank you!
  • Question
    Seek id’ this as green-dragon/Arisaema dracontium. I’ve not seen it before this spring. My property abuts a large wooded conservation area & there is a decent patch spanning the property line. The area has a high water table, deep shade with oaks, white pine, black haw & a recent explosion in the # of low bush blueberries. Did Seek get it right?
    Answer
    Der Jessercat, the plant you have photographed is Lysimachia borealis (starflower; formerly known as Trientalis borealis). This is a common, native, forest understory herb in New England. The plant you were thinking of is found in rich, moist soils (such as high-terrace floodplain forests of moderate-sized to major rivers). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have several if these coming up in the yard. I picked Ranunculus pensylvanicus (Pennsylvania Buttercup). Agree?
    Answer
    Dear Chris, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist.
  • Question
    Found this plant in Middletown, CT. Partially wooded area, marshy wetlands nearby (~200 feet away). I’m wondering if this is Putty-Root or just something similar looking, I didn’t see a basal leaf but it was also next to a path, could’ve possibly broken off.
    Answer
    Dear amikolinski, hello! You've photographed, in all likelihood, Smilax herbacea (carrion-flower), which is a relative of the green briar, but lacks prickles on the stem. If you can visit this plant shortly, you will see it open up and will have leaf stems that climb/trail by stipular tendrils and spherical arrays of small, green flowers. Best wishes.
  • Question
    popped up in the garden in coastal ct
    Answer
    Dear thatonetreetho, good morning. There is no image associate with your question. Without one (or better, multiple images from different angles) I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images then attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist you.
  • Question
    Tiny plant growing on wet gravel/dirt path near old beaver pond, Jonesboro, Maine. There is Houstonia caerula nearby. I can't tell what is sepal and what is petal, or leaf. The plant photo might be upside down. Leaves/sepals/petals seem pubescent. seems pubescent. Stem is yellow-green as are the flowers (if those are flowers). Could it be Linum radiola (I've never seen that).
    Answer
    Dear Carol, good morning to you. You likely have photographed Chrysosplenium americanum (golden-saxifrage), a small, native herb of wetlands, seeps, and shorelines. It is like other saxifrages but has four sepals and petals (rather than five) and has opposite leaves (most other members of the family in the northeast have alternate or all basal leaves). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello ‌ Can you help me identify these two species?
    Answer
    Dear Sadegh, good morning. I'm sorry, I can't assist you. I do wish I could help with your question. Please be aware that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (United States). While I will entertain any plant-related question, some topics and regions are outside of my expertise. Good luck with your question and I hope you find an answer.
  • Question
    Found this plant in Berlin, CT - a wooded area with wetland close by (about 300ft away). Uploading a photo of the flowers and leaves for better ID. So far no apps have been able to match it. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear sarinabosco, The plant pictured in your images is Dicentra cucullaria (Dutchman's-breeches), a native member of the poppy family that flowers very early in the season. It is a spring ephemeral and will be largely gone from the forest floor within a 50 days or so, returning to dormancy via its underground storage organ. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I had a plant pop up in my flower bed last year that got to be 6ft tall with really large heart shaped leaves that were velvety. We identified it as a velvet leaf and the web said it was bad. It also said it was an annual. So why has it come back again this year. I live in north west Tennessee and I'm really confused because the web showed it having blooms and pods. This one didn't. Is possible that it's not a velvet leaf?
    Answer
    Dear Shirjean, good morning. Arbutilon theophrasti (velvetleaf) is a species of plant that can utilize human-disturbed habitats. It is frequent in areas of cultivation. It is able to store seeds in the seed bank, so removing a mature plant does not necessarily remove all of the seeds. Depending on how many are present, they could germinate for years to come. Without an image, I am not able to tell you what plant you observed. If more come, feel free to post an image so I can help you identify it. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello While walking at the Macdonald Conservation Area ( Readfield ME.) I think I spotted Huperzia Lucidula. Shining Firmoss. The area is woodland and was on the wet/damp side. Could you please confirm? It took me while to find a possible ID. Thanks
    Answer
    Dear efsilver65, good morning. You have photographed Spinulum annotinum (common interrupted-clubmoss). This species is sometimes confused with Huperzia species, but it will produce sessile spore cones at the summit of the upright shoots (rather than having spores borne in alternating zones along the shoot). The genus Spinulum doesn't produce gemmiphores (specialized branches with tiny, six-leaved bulbils), but Huperzia does. So, if this was a species of Huperzia, those branchlets and gemmae would have been present. I hope this is helpful.
  • Question
    Hello! Could you tell me if Rudbeckia nitida is a synonym for R. laciniata? Some sites seem to link them as one.
    Answer
    Dear laurie.r, good morning. Rudbeckia nitida (shiny coneflower) is a species of plant that is perennial native to the southeastern United States. It was described in 1834 and is not a synonym of Rudbeckia laciniata (but a different species in the same genus). Best wishes.
  • Question
    Verigated vine with tiny white flowers.
    Answer
    Dear ejackson.sykes, good morning. There are no images associated with your question. Without them, I won't be able to assist you. If you are having trouble uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist. Please be sure to include general location (state, province) and habitat information. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi so i recently found this growing in my yard, i’m not sure what it is but i love it. Kinda resembles some succulents if seen. It looks like it’s growing with the moss like covering a big area. It’s behind my pool deck, on the side of my house where i don’t get much sun and along the fence line. i’ve tried to put some ina pot and bring it inside cause i love the way it looks just want to know more about it if you knew anything ! I’m living in lincoln RI in the salesville area
    Answer
    Dear Stromyy, good morning again. I'm glad you were able to upload an image. It looks like you might have a species of stonecrop (genus Sedum). However, without flowers, I wouldn't be able to confirm the species. If it flowers, please try to get several images from different angles (including the leaves) and I will likely be able to help. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I'm on a mud season trip to Colorado and New Mexico, so I haven't seen these plants in question firsthand, but the Androscoggin Land Trust's stewardship director was checking out a possible property acquisition that includes part of Curtis Bog in Sabbatus and she found what looks like Epigea repens, but with blue flowers. I've only seen white or pinkish flowers. You ever seen blue? Or do we have something else here?
    Answer
    Dear rspeer566, good morning to you. Yes, I have seen Epigaea repens with a slight blue tinge. This isn't the common form that I observe by any means, but it is something I've observed in more than one location. So, you were correct with the identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi! so i found this growing in my yard this year i’ve never checked before but i have a small dog now so i always go out and make sure there’s no ways he could get out, i found these everywhere ! Bright green Looks like it grows like a moss cause it’s every where behind my pool deck and the line of the fence. i live in LINCOLN RI so it’s kinda a wet area.
    Answer
    Dear Stromyy, good morning. There is no image associated with your question. Without one, I can't assist you. If you are having difficulty uploading images, feel free to attach them to an email and send them to ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org and I will try to assist you. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Which microrhizae are used by Pyrola picta in Southwestern Washington.
    Answer
    Dear MarcR, good morning. I'm sorry, I can't help you. Micorrhizal associations in the Pacific Northwest are outside of my realm of expertise. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I hope you are able to find the answer you are seeking. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Which microrhizae are used bu Pyrola in germination
    Answer
    Dear MarcR, the question you have raised is interesting, but far too open to be able to provide an answer. We would need to know the species and region of the world you are interested in. Here are some links that might get your research stzarted: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33215330/; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28707027/; and https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321019115_Mycorrhiza_of_pyroloids_Pyrola_rotundifolia_P_media_and_Orthilia_secunda_Species_composition_of_symbionts_and_trophic_status_of_plants_in_Russian_Mikoriza_grusankovyh_Pyrola_rotundifolia_P_media_i_Ort. Good luck with your study.
  • Question
    Are any mail order nurseries offering any species of Pyrola or Chimaphyla?
    Answer
    Dear MarcR, good morning. I'm sorry I can't answer your question. My expertise is taxonomy and conservation of New England's plants. You might trying contacting the horticulture department at Native Plant Trust to identify if these are offered, but I do not believe they are shipped through the mail. Good luck with your search.
  • Question
    Hello! I have a question about the length of time it takes for fruit to ripen: do you know of any specie, anywhere, that takes longer than one year to go from flower to fruit? I've been looking for a direct answer to this, but haven't found one yet. Thanks!
    Answer
    Dear Jomog369, good morning. The answer is yes, there are some species that take longer than one year. Members of the black oak group have carpellate (ovule-bearing) flowers that are fertilized in the spring of one year and don't mature until the autumn of the next year. Therefore, they overwinter on the plant as very small, immature acorns. I hope this helps.
  • Question
    Hi, I had heard/experimented with inserting a big nail on a Papaya tree to bear fruits. This technique worked when we tested it in Central India (Madhya Pradesh). I also found that this technique works in other places as well. I would like to know the science behind this and how the plant internally reacts after the nail was insetred. Pls, explain in deatils. Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear abera@smu.edu, I have no experience using this method to produce fruit on papaya trees. However, there are places where you can read that others have done so and succeeded in producing fruit. It has been suggested that the trauma causes the tree to either change sex (from pollen-bearing to fruit-bearing) or invigorate production of fruit in fruit-bearing trees (essentially, if the tree senses trauma that could lead to the death of the plant, all resources go into producing fruit). Again, I have no experience, this is only what I've read. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi there, I have a rose of sharon question. I did a pretty heavy pruning this year and I noticed that after a few days, some of the freshly cut branches developed a dark, fuzzy substance on them. I was wondering if anyone knew what this could be/be caused by and what to do about it to ensure I have a happy, healthy plant. Any help would be great.
    Answer
    Dear Brian.D, good afternoon. I'm unable to answer your question because I am not a horticulturalist or plant pathologist. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I do hope you can find an answer to your question. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I need to know the synthesis of the white powder of the branches in the plant aloidendron dichotomun (Aloe dichotomun or quiver tree), or any other information related to the white powder composition. Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear Yerbi, good morning. The white powder you refer to on the branches of Aloidendron dichotomum is thought to serve the purpose of reflecting the sun to prevent desiccation. What the powder is made of I do not know. Sometimes, in other species of plants, the bloom on various organs is made of waxes that can also have the function of shedding water or making it difficult for insects to adhere to the surfaces. I'm sorry I can't assist you with your question, as this tree is far outside my geographic range of expertise.
  • Question
    Hello, Can you identify this plant, bush, tree? Thank you.
    Answer
    Dear Placo369, good morning. Sorry, the answer is no, I can't from the snippet of image provided. To help you further, I would need more images (leaves, open flowers, etc.) and I would need to know where the plant was growing. Location information is very important for identification. Best wishes.
  • Question
    My photo didnt attach so here is the question again. My great grandmother was given a cutting of this plant 30 years ago and never knew the species. She grew a full plant from it. She has since passed away and we would like to know the species. Searching it by image on Google yields a different result every time, as so a couple of 'plant identifying' apps. It seems the flowers and leaves are similar to lots of other plants. We are in Tasmania, the southern most state of Australia. Thankyou.
    Answer
    Dear jsdsgn, good afternoon. I'm glad to see you were able to post the image to Plant Share. However, as I suspected might be the case, I'm not able to suggest and identification for your plant. You are too far out of my region of expertise. I'm sorry for this and hope you can find a group closer to your home to assist.
  • Question
    Hello! The photos attached are all from the same willow plant found in a wetland on our property in Stowe, VT. The catkins have a rosy hue. Unfortunately, I do not have photos of the leaves as I just noticed the plant. Is there anyway to tell from the photos if this a native species, or even to identify the specific species? If not, what can I look for when this plant leafs out in order to ID? Thank you!
    Answer
    Dear laurie.r, good morning. It is too early in the development of the flowering aments to determine who the willow species is. If you can get some later specimens when they are in full flower with some measurements of the length of the catkins, I may be able to assist then. Best wishes.
  • Question
    In my region zone 8-9 we don't plant Quercus sober or Quercus ilex inside the lawn, so that the water from the sprinklers wont cause the tree to rot, but Im wondering if there is a way to plant inside the tree dripline with lawn grass?
    Answer
    Dear asafraini, good morning. I'm sorry I can't help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of northeastern North America. The species of oak you mention are not familiar to me. I wish I could assist and I hope you find answers to your questions.
  • Question
    My great grandmother was given a cutting of this plant 30 years ago and never knew the species. She grew a full plant from it. She has since passed away and we would like to know the species. Searching it by image on Google yields a different result every time, as so a couple of 'plant identifying' apps. It seems the flowers and leaves are similar to lots of other plants. We are in Tasmania, the southern most state of Australia. Thankyou.
    Answer
    Dear jsdsgn, good morning. There is no image associated with your question. Without one, I definitely can't assist you. That written, it may be difficult for me to offer help because cultivated plants are not my realm of expertise. I'm happy to examine the image and can pass it along to try and find someone who will recognize it. Best wishes and good luck.
  • Question
    I'm not sure this is a plant, it smells like a carcass, surrounded by flies, and appears out of nowhere. But it doesn't happen everyday so I don't know where else to ask. For your information, there is a female turtle living in our small garden so maybe it's a product of it, maybe from its eggs or else. However, it's still confusing about how an unfertilized egg grows from inside the soil. Please help clear our confusion, please. And sorry if this turns out to be not botanical. Thank you :)
    Answer
    Dear pascalitaaaaaaaa, while I can't help you with much confidence, it looks like a fungus to me. You might try asking your question in a fungi group and see what kind of answer you get. Good luck.
  • Question
    Trying to identify this plant that has popped up in various places in my yard. It has a crown like strawberries do, if that makes sense. I’m completely new to gardening/plants!
    Answer
    Dear marcell, good morning. I can't tell you which species you have observed. I would need flowers and your location to do so. Locality information is really important as it helps to narrow down the choices because many plants grow is specific parts of the world. As best I can tell, the leaves might belong to a Geranium (crane's-bill) or a member of the crane's-bill family. Good luck with your mystery.
  • Question
    How can I get some arabidopsis seeds?
    Answer
    Dear billc1023, good afternoon to you. I'm not certain, this is not a plant that I purchase seeds of. You might try using a web search and using terms like "Arabidospis", "seeds", and "price". I presume you are intending to purchase Arabidopsis thalliana, if this is correct, use the specific epithet in your searches as well. Good luck.
  • Question
    Good morning. Fotos from Franklin Co, MA. Any idea as to what plant(s) this is? Thanks.
    Answer
    Dear Redpoll, good afternoon. I do believe I can answer this question with a better image of the entire plant (it is too small for me to see on Plant Share). Can you email me the original images? My email is ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org, I should be able to assist. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi there! I was wondering if you had any insight on the American elm tree? Suppose I am trying to detangle the roots of the tree from an invasive plant (Japanese Knotweed), when would be the optimal time of year to do this? How long can elm tree roots be exposed? Is there a time constraint at all? I live in a 4 season climate.
    Answer
    Der monn7, good afternoon. The short answer to your question is I may not be able to assist you. There are too many variables that I would need to know. I do not know the size of the elm tree you are speaking about. In any case, if I were to attempt something as you state, I would try to do so on rainy/cloudy days to limit water stress and return the roots of the tree as quickly as possible to moistened soil. If the root mass is small enough, it can be dunked in a bucket of water or (otherwise) sprayed with a hose periodically to keep them moist. Good luck.
  • Question
    Could you help me identify this plant? It was found in a marshy area in North Bennington, Vermont. I originally thought that it was a Juncus, but I am unable to see tepals.
    Answer
    Dear doctornancy, good morning. You do indeed have a species of Juncus (rush), but I can't see enough of the plant clearly to tell you which species you have found. If you want to continue to correspond (assuming you still have the specimen) and send some additional images, we can probably figure it out. I'm available at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Do you know if Agalinis maritima var. grandiflora is a hemiparasitic plant? Where could I find more information about how a hemiparasitic plan functions?
    Answer
    Dear Aunti, as I undestand, species of Agalinis are hemiparasitic plants. You can learn more about these through a web search (use search terms like: hemiparasitism, Agalinis, Orobanchaceae) and you should find articles. Best wishes.
  • Question
    We bought a bamboo and have potted in a huge pot. Since that day it started to become dry and falling out. It’s also winter here. So there isnt enough sun light. We water once a week but still it doesn’t look good
    Answer
    Dear dinesh, good afternoon. I wish I could help you. However, Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. I am happy to entertain cultivation and horticulture questions; however, some of these questions are outside of my realm of expertise. I hope you are able to rescue your plant.
  • Question
    Hello, although this plant is in my yard, I am assuming it is wild as it has popped up last summer. Quickly spreading I attempted to identify it via google lens books etc. Last evening, whilst cleaning up branches from snowfall, I noticed this elusive plant peeking through the snow! It is still quite green! Naturally, I had to investigate & upon touching this clump, it came loose. Curiouser then ever, again trying to identify I found this site! I do hope someone can help. NE PENNA
    Answer
    Dear Ne Penna, good morning. I don't recognize this plant as a species that grows in northeastern North America. Please keep in mind that Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (USA). Though I'm happy to assist with any plant-related question if I can, plants growing outside of this area may not be within my realm of expertise. Best wishes.
  • Question
    I have a Ficus Elastica Tineke. I recently just brought it home from a local seller. She tells me she mixes 30-10-10 fertilizer with distilled water and waters her plant every Saturday. My first watering, I watered it once with tap water and no fertilizer. Now the leaves look like this. Pls help :(
    Answer
    Dear julie920, good morning. I do wish I could help. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England. As such, gardening and horticulture questions are outside of my expertise. I hope you are able to identify what is occurring and keep your plant alive. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello....Iam an undergraduate in Agriculture and Forestry University, Rampur, Nepal. I'm recently working on stinging neetle plant and found some species. I wanted to know it's taxonomy for further research and works. I also want to study its physiology, nutritional value and health benefits on human and other animal species....I need your help. Also, If you could give some guidance and some help ...
    Answer
    Dear sailendrakadel108, Here is a paper for its taxonomy: Henning, T., D. Quandt, B. Grosse-Veldmann, A. Monro, and M. Weigand. 2014. Weeding the Nettles II: A delimitation of “Urtica dioica L.” (Urticaceae) based on morphological and molecular data, including a rehabilitation of Urtica gracilis Ait. Phytotaxa 162: 61–83. Contact me at ahaines@nativeplanttrust.org for other questions you may have. Good luck with your study.
  • Question
    Hello I am a senior in high school and I'm currently working on a project that's about growing a non-native plant in an unfamiliar climate. I am trying to grow the Croton petra in my home and the project requires that I get an expert's opinion/advice to aid my research. Although this is not a New England plant, I was wondering if I was able to interview somebody via email to help give me the guidance I need to appease my teacher. This is a cute lil cite, your time is greatly appreciated!-Lauren
    Answer
    Dear Lauren, good morning. While I cannot offer you much expertise on growing a species of Croton (I'm a plant taxonomist, not a cultivator or horticulturalist), there is someone who may be able to assist. Our horticulturist is Uli Lorimer (ulorimer@nativeplanttrust.org). I cannot speak to his schedule and if he has time, but you might direct your question there for assistance. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I have a question about Sorbus aucuparia. In the Sorbus key it says it can be distinguished from other species by the fact that the adaxial surface of its leaves are villous, but then in the page https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/species/sorbus/aucuparia/ it says that the lower surface of the leaflets are hairy. I thought adaxial = upper surface of the leaf, so is there a mistake somewhere?
    Answer
    Dear SigFig, good morning. These two statements are not in contradiction. One speaks to the adaxial (upper) surface and the other speaks to the abaxial (lower) surface. The taxon page (the second resource you mention) simply provides a greater description (i.e., more characteristics) about the plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hello, I've been baffled by this yew for years. I originally dig it up in Plymouth MA in 2008 in a wild-ish situation, and am thinking it's either an English or a Japanese Yew (but Japanese is not on your range map). It's upright, not sprawling like canadensis. Also, re: the first bud pic on your cuspidata page really a flower bud, as indicated, or is it a leaf bud? Thanks for any clues.
    Answer
    Dear corylus, good morning. I am hesitant to identify species of Taxus from a couple of images due to the difficulty, this imposed by hybrid plants that have entered the horticulture trade. That written, I offer that your plant is similar to Taxus cuspidata in leaf phyllotaxis and blade shape, winter bud scale shape, and details of the petiole. Taxus cuspidata would be my first hypothesis for your plant. Best wishes.
  • Question
    Hi there, I'm trying to identify these showy plants that grow very tall along roads in VT. I appreciate your help!
    Answer
    Dear jebcas, good afternoon to you. These look like the flowering arrays of Phragmites (reed), most likely Phragmites australis(common reed). Without seeing the stem and leaf sheaths, I can't be certain of the species (we do have a native species, but it is much less common and not often roadside). Best wishes.
  • Question
    I found this vine recently on a boulder in upland woods in Woburn, MA. Is it Vaccinium vitis-idaea? Thanks, Tom
    Answer
    Dear TomW, good afternoon. The image is a little small, but it appears to be Mitchella repens (partridgeberry) that is growing down a small rock face. The opposite leaves support this (Vaccinium species have alternate leaves). Best wishes.